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Digital Storytelling Activities - Richard Byrne

Digital Storytelling Activities - Richard Byrne
Video-base Activities -Beginner Activity: 1. Register for Animoto.com (select education version to gain access to advanced features for free) 2. Select a video theme from Animoto. 3. 3a. 4. 5. 5a. 6. -Intermediate Activity: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. -Advanced Activity: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. -Highly Advanced Activity: 1. 2. 3. Image-Based Activities 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Using Google Maps and Google Earth to Tell a Story -Click here for full directions on using Google Maps and Google Earth.

https://sites.google.com/site/richardbyrnepdsite/digital-storytelling/digital-storytelling-challenge-activities

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BoomWriter - Schools BoomWriter lets you easily incorporate and experience the benefits of technology as your students are engaged in the following (or similar) standards-based learning activities: Grade 3 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.3 - Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. Using BoomWriter’s feature allowing teachers to create their own story start, students collaboratively create imagined multi-paragraph personal narratives using a teacher generated prompt (e.g. “When I woke up on Saturday morning, I had no idea I was in for the craziest day of my entire life…”). Grade 5

Story Sticks This past weekend we had absolutely no plans, so I decided to make Saturday a project day, inspired by a couple projects I saw on Pinterest. The first project was inspired by this: It's a cute little jar filled with painted popsicle sticks with date night ideas. Super cute. But I wanted to do something with the kiddo, so I came up with this alternative.

9 Web 2.0 Sites to Publish Student Work Written by Mark Brumley Publish and Share Student Work Publishing educational technology enhanced content online, in eye-catching formats, is easier than ever. And, students love to publish their projects online and share with their family and friends. DigitalStorytelling “I know only one thing about the technologies that awaits us in the future:We will find ways to tell stories with them.” Jason Ohlar Presentation brought to you by American TESOL!

10 Life Lessons Worth Teaching Next Year What should you be teaching? Every class has standards and curricula to attend to, but we have so many options for teaching our materials. Creative instruction is important to maximizing learning for students and enjoying our classroom time as educators. What happens when we teach from a slightly different angle–when we layer our teaching with elements of social and emotional learning, empathy, creativity, analysis, and the arts, and consciously access the different learning styles? Can we use our content areas as a vehicles to teach skills and add in the other areas?

30 Ideas for Teaching Writing Summary: Few sources available today offer writing teachers such succinct, practice-based help—which is one reason why 30 Ideas for Teaching Writing was the winner of the Association of Education Publishers 2005 Distinguished Achievement Award for Instructional Materials. The National Writing Project's 30 Ideas for Teaching Writing offers successful strategies contributed by experienced Writing Project teachers. Since NWP does not promote a single approach to teaching writing, readers will benefit from a variety of eclectic, classroom-tested techniques. These ideas originated as full-length articles in NWP publications (a link to the full article accompanies each idea below). Table of Contents: 30 Ideas for Teaching Writing 1.

8 Steps To Great Digital Storytelling Stories bring us together, encourage us to understand and empathize, and help us to communicate. Long before paper and books were common and affordable, information passed from generation to generation through this oral tradition of storytelling. Consider Digital Storytelling as the 21st Century version of the age-old art of storytelling with a twist: digital tools now make it possible for anyone to create a story and share it with the world. WHY Digital Storytelling? Digital stories push students to become creators of content, rather than just consumers. Weaving together images, music, text, and voice, digital stories can be created in all content areas and at all grade levels while incorporating the 21st century skills of creating, communicating, and collaborating.

Institute for Writing and Rhetoric Though the connection between reading and writing seems to be a "given," reading was not always a dominant force in writing classrooms. In the nineteenth century, students did not typically write analyses of what they read, but instead wrote themes on prescribed topics, such as Vanity, Democracy, Ethics, and so on. Reading and writing became curricularly linked at the turn of the century, when Harvard and other universities decided that reading literature was essential to learning to write. The reasons for this curricular link are the same today as they were one hundred years ago. Those who argue in favor of reading in the writing classroom claim that reading inspires students, introducing them to great ideas and improving their ability to think critically and analytically.

Help Students Tell Stories Human beings are storytellers by nature. Children especially love to hear stories, but aren’t always so keen on telling their own. Partly because they’re kids. Telling stories is more about the imagination and the curiosity and even the tall tales, and less about articulating a narrative to a specific audience through innovative tools.

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