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Of Mice and Men: Analysis of Major Characters

Of Mice and Men: Analysis of Major Characters
Lennie Although Lennie is among the principal characters in Of Mice and Men, he is perhaps the least dynamic. He undergoes no significant changes, development, or growth throughout the story and remains exactly as the reader encounters him in the opening pages. Simply put, he loves to pet soft things, is blindly devoted to George and their vision of the farm, and possesses incredible physical strength. Nearly every scene in which Lennie appears confirms these and only these characteristics. Although Steinbeck’s insistent repetition of these characteristics makes Lennie a rather flat character, Lennie’s simplicity is central to Steinbeck’s conception of the novella. George Like Lennie, George can be defined by a few distinct characteristics. Unlike Lennie, however, George does change as the story progresses. Candy One of the book’s major themes and several of its dominant symbols revolve around Candy. Curley’s wife Of Mice and Men is not kind in its portrayal of women. Crooks

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The Great Depression - Facts & Summary Hoover, a Republican who had formerly served as U.S. secretary of commerce, believed that government should not directly intervene in the economy, and that it did not have the responsibility to create jobs or provide economic relief for its citizens. In 1932, however, with the country mired in the depths of the Great Depression and some 15 million people (more than 20 percent of the U.S. population at the time) unemployed, Democrat Franklin D. Roosevelt won an overwhelming victory in the presidential election. By Inauguration Day (March 4, 1933), every U.S. state had ordered all remaining banks to close at the end of the fourth wave of banking panics, and the U.S. Roosevelt took immediate action to address the country’s economic woes, first announcing a four-day “bank holiday” during which all banks would close so that Congress could pass reform legislation and reopen those banks determined to be sound.

Of Mice and Men: Themes, Motifs & Symbols Themes Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work. The Predatory Nature of Human Existence Of Mice and Men teaches a grim lesson about the nature of human existence. In scenes such as this one, Steinbeck records a profound human truth: oppression does not come only from the hands of the strong or the powerful. Fraternity and the Idealized Male Friendship One of the reasons that the tragic end of George and Lennie’s friendship has such a profound impact is that one senses that the friends have, by the end of the novella, lost a dream larger than themselves. Ultimately, however, the world is too harsh and predatory a place to sustain such relationships. The Impossibility of the American Dream Most of the characters in Of Mice and Men admit, at one point or another, to dreaming of a different life. Motifs Motifs are recurring structures, contrasts, and literary devices that can help to develop and inform the text’s major themes. The Corrupting Power of Women

Of Mice and Men: Plot Overview Two migrant workers, George and Lennie, have been let off a bus miles away from the California farm where they are due to start work. George is a small, dark man with “sharp, strong features.” Lennie, his companion, is his opposite, a giant of a man with a “shapeless” face. The next day, the men report to the nearby ranch. The next day, George confides in Slim that he and Lennie are not cousins, but have been friends since childhood. Slim goes to the barn to do some work, and Curley, who is maniacally searching for his wife, heads to the barn to accost Slim. The next night, most of the men go to the local brothel. Lennie flees back to a pool of the Salinas River that George had designated as a meeting place should either of them get into trouble. When the other men arrive, George lets them believe that Lennie had the gun, and George wrestled it away from him and shot him.

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck - review | Children's books Of Mice and Men is a well-known classic, and with valid reason. The book may seem rather boring (as many books about the Great Depression may seem) but it is actually a great tribute to literature. The book is about a man called George and his childlike, kind-hearted friend Lennie. The book is great because, not only the great use of description, but the characters because Steinbeck shows how children are, in some cases, better people than adults in the way that they do not judge people because they do not see people or things from that point of view (an example being childlike Lennie who has a mental disability though they didn't know that at the time the book is based). The great thing about that is that it shows some of the other characters' feelings about the situations they are being put in and shows how Steinbeck feels about racism and sexism. Want to tell the world about a book you've read?

John Steinbeck Biography :: National Steinbeck Center Early Years: Salinas to Stanford: 1902-1925 John Steinbeck was born on February 27, 1902 in Salinas, California, the third child of Olive Hamilton, former school teacher, and John Ernst Steinbeck, manager at Sperry Flour mill. He had two older sisters, Esther and Beth, and a younger sister, Mary. In the early twentieth century, Salinas was a prosperous farming community, the county seat of Monterey County, and a trading and shipping center for the lower Salinas Valley. From his birth until he went to Stanford University in 1919, Steinbeck enjoyed a comfortable childhood and youth in Salinas, although the family experienced setbacks when he was a teenager. When he was four, Steinbeck was given his own pony, Jill, an inspiration for his later series of stories, The Red Pony. Young Steinbeck was also a reader. In early adolescence, John Steinbeck showed a strong interest in writing. In 1919, Steinbeck enrolled at Stanford University, hoping to sharpen his writing skills.

Of Mice and Men: Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men | Book Summary & Study Guide | CliffsNotes John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men is a parable about what it means to be human. Steinbeck's story of George and Lennie's ambition of owning their own ranch, and the obstacles that stand in the way of that ambition, reveal the nature of dreams, dignity, loneliness, and sacrifice. Ultimately, Lennie, the mentally handicapped giant who makes George's dream of owning his own ranch worthwhile, ironically becomes the greatest obstacle to achieving that dream. Written by: John Steinbeck Type of Work: novel Genres: parable; Great Depression First Published: 1937 Setting: a ranch Main Characters: George Milton; Lennie Small; Candy; Curley; Curley's wife; Slim; Crooks Major Thematic Topics: nature of dreams; barriers; powerlessness; fate; Christian influences; classical influences; natural influences; loss of paradise; my brother's keeper; ephemeral nature of life Motifs: nature; loneliness; animalism versus humanity Major Symbols: characters; locations; animal imagery; George's card game; hands

GCSE Bitesize: The Depression Of Mice and Men: Context John Steinbeck was born in 1902 in Salinas, California, a region that became the setting for much of his fiction, including Of Mice and Men. As a teenager, he spent his summers working as a hired hand on neighboring ranches, where his experiences of rural California and its people impressed him deeply. In 1919, he enrolled at Stanford University, where he studied intermittently for the next six years before finally leaving without having earned a degree. For the next five years, he worked as a reporter and then as caretaker for a Lake Tahoe estate while he completed his first novel, an adventure story called Cup of Gold, which was published in 1929. In his acceptance speech for the 1962 Nobel Prize in literature, Steinbeck said: . . . the writer is delegated to declare and to celebrate man’s proven capacity for greatness of heart and spirit—for gallantry in defeat, for courage, compassion and love. Critical opinions of Steinbeck’s work have always been mixed.

15 Things You Might Not Know About 'Of Mice and Men' You probably spent some time as a teenager reading John Steinbeck’s novella Of Mice and Men. Even if you know about Lennie and George’s heartbreaking pursuit of life, liberty, and a hutch full of rabbits, there are a few things you might have missed about the iconic story during English class. Although he was a Stanford University graduate and had published five books by the time he wrote Of Mice and Men, Steinbeck had more in common with his itinerant main characters than readers might have expected. In the same New York Times article, Steinbeck recalled a fellow laborer on whom Lennie Small’s arc was based: “Lennie was a real person. The stage intrigued Steinbeck as much as prose did, and the book shares similarities with both media. Around eight months after its initial publication, Of Mice and Men made its way to the stage, opening in New York in November of 1937. Of Mice and Men proves that with such prevalence comes backlash.

Of Mice and Men: Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men | Book Summary & Study Guide | CliffsNotes The novel opens with two men, George Milton and Lennie Small, walking to a nearby ranch where harvesting jobs are available. George, the smaller man, leads the way and makes the decisions for Lennie, a mentally handicapped giant. They stop at a stream for the evening, deciding to go to the ranch in the morning. Lennie, who loves to pet anything soft, has a dead mouse in his pocket. George takes the mouse away from Lennie and reminds him of the trouble Lennie got into in the last town they were in — he touched a girl's soft dress. George then reminds Lennie not to speak to anyone in the morning when they get to the ranch and cautions Lennie to return to this place by the river if anything bad happens at the ranch. When he has to take the dead mouse away from Lennie a second time, George chafes at the hardship of taking care of Lennie. The next morning at the ranch, the boss becomes suspicious when George answers all the questions and Lennie does not talk.

Of Mice and Men: Key Facts full title · Of Mice and Men author · John Steinbeck type of work · Novella genre · Fiction; tragedy language · English time and place written · Mid-1930s; Pacific Grove and Los Gatos ranch, California date of first publication · 1937 publisher · Covici, Friede, Inc. narrator · Third-person omniscient climax · Lennie accidentally kills Curley’s wife in the barn protagonists · George and Lennie antagonists · Curley; society; the cruel, predatory nature of human life setting (time) · 1930s setting (place) · South of Soledad, California point of view · The story is told from the point of view of a third-person omniscient narrator, who can access the point of view of any character as required by the narrative. falling action · Lennie runs away from the barn; the men return and find Curley’s wife dead; Curley leads a mob of men to search for and kill Lennie; George finds Lennie in the clearing and, while retelling the story of life on their farm, shoots him in the back of the head.

Of Mice and Men Of Mice and Men is a novella[1][2] written by Nobel Prize-winning author John Steinbeck. Published in 1937, it tells the story of George Milton and Lennie Small, two displaced migrant ranch workers, who move from place to place in search of new job opportunities during the Great Depression in California, United States. Based on Steinbeck's own experiences as a bindlestiff in the 1920s (before the arrival of the Okies he would vividly describe in The Grapes of Wrath), the title is taken from Robert Burns' poem "To a Mouse", which read: "The best laid schemes o' mice an' men / Gang aft agley." (The best laid schemes of mice and men / Often go awry.) Required reading in many schools,[3] Of Mice and Men has been a frequent target of censors for vulgarity and what some consider offensive and racist language; consequently, it appears on the American Library Association's list of the Most Challenged Books of 21st Century.[4] Plot summary Lennie accidentally kills his puppy while stroking it.

Race During the Great Depression - American Memory Timeline- Classroom Presentation The problems of the Great Depression affected virtually every group of Americans. No group was harder hit than African Americans, however. By 1932, approximately half of black Americans were out of work. In some Northern cities, whites called for blacks to be fired from any jobs as long as there were whites out of work. Racial violence again became more common, especially in the South. Lynchings, which had declined to eight in 1932, surged to 28 in 1933. Although most African Americans traditionally voted Republican, the election of President Franklin Roosevelt began to change voting patterns. Still, discrimination occurred in New Deal housing and employment projects, and President Roosevelt, for political reasons, did not back all of the legislation favored by such groups as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

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