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Kierkegaard on Anxiety & Creativity

Kierkegaard on Anxiety & Creativity
by Maria Popova “Because it is possible to create — creating one’s self, willing to be one’s self… — one has anxiety. One would have no anxiety if there were no possibility whatever.” “Anxiety is love’s greatest killer,” Anaïs Nin famously wrote. But what, exactly, is anxiety, that pervasive affliction the nature of which remains as drowning yet as elusive as the substance of a shadow? In his 1844 treatise The Concept of Anxiety (public library), Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard (1813–1855) explains anxiety as the dizzying effect of freedom, of paralyzing possibility, of the boundlessness of one’s own existence — a kind existential paradox of choice. Anxiety is a qualification of dreaming spirit, and as such it has its place in psychology. He captures the invariable acuteness of anxiety’s varied expressions: Anxiety can just as well express itself by muteness as by a scream. Donating = Loving Bringing you (ad-free) Brain Pickings takes hundreds of hours each month. Share on Tumblr

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Mark McGuinness Mark Mark McGuinness I’m a poet, coach and creative entrepreneur, living in London, UK and coaching creatives worldwide via the magic of the internet. Why creativity? I’ve always loved creating. 6 Steps To Set Good Boundaries In the past two months, I have learned more about the importance of boundaries than I have in my entire adult life. I used to keep adjusting my boundaries to fit each relationship. Now I understand that boundaries are about your relationship with yourself and your own values, and that they shouldn't be so fluid. Today, I want to share what I have learned and break it down for you in five incredibly simple steps. I have gained so much understanding about this topic from the book Boundaries by Dr.

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WITTGENSTEIN AND DECONSTRUCTION Nicholas F. Gier, Professor Emeritus Department of Philosophy, University of Idaho Presented at the Northwest Conference on Philosophy Lewis & Clark College, November, 1989 published in Review of Contemporary Philosophy 6 (2007) "You could say of my work that it is phenomenology." --Wittgenstein to M.

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