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Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon
Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St. Alban,[a] QC (/ˈbeɪkən/; 22 January 1561 – 9 April 1626), was an English philosopher, statesman, scientist, jurist, orator, essayist, and author. He served both as Attorney General and Lord Chancellor of England. After his death, he remained extremely influential through his works, especially as philosophical advocate and practitioner of the scientific method during the scientific revolution. Bacon has been called the father of empiricism.[4] His works established and popularised inductive methodologies for scientific inquiry, often called the Baconian method, or simply the scientific method. His demand for a planned procedure of investigating all things natural marked a new turn in the rhetorical and theoretical framework for science, much of which still surrounds conceptions of proper methodology today. Bacon was knighted in 1603, and created Baron Verulam in 1618 and Viscount St. Biography[edit] Early life[edit] The 18-year-old Francis Bacon.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Bacon

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Garcia Hoz Victor - Educacion Personalizada En La Familia Upload Log In Sign up Browse Pardon Francis Bacon Petition Target: United Kingdom Petition Background (Preamble): As main organizer of this petition, I would like to add a brief note. The approach to this petition has been long and tedious; over two years striving continuously to seek for a higher lever of accountability and consistency of websites to host this project. Sir Francis Bacon, the Count of St. Germain, the Supernova of 1604 and the 800 Year Spiritual Cycle "But one thing is certain: he was highly visible in the royal courts—and invisible! He was seen to 'disappear' as he left the private quarters of the king and queen at Versailles.Without a doubt, his feats as the Count Saint Germain are exclamation ponts across the diaries of the eighteenth century greats. In the court memoir of Madame de Pompadour, Prince Karl of Hesse and Madame d'Adhémar, he is remembered as l'homme extrordinaire. Described as slim but well-proportioned, of medium height and with pleasant features, he had fascinating eyes which captivated the observing the chance to study them. He wore diamonds on every finger—and on his shoe buckles. Even after his remarkable conversation with the Countess de Georgy in 1767, he did not age.

Paracelsus Paracelsus (/ˌpærəˈsɛlsəs/; born Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim, 11 November or 17 December 1493 – 24 September 1541) was a Swiss German[3] Renaissance physician, botanist, alchemist, astrologer, and general occultist.[4] He founded the discipline of toxicology.[5] He is also known as a revolutionary for insisting upon using observations of nature, rather than looking to ancient texts, in open and radical defiance of medical practice of his day.[5] He is also credited for giving zinc its name, calling it zincum.[6][7] Modern psychology often also credits him for being the first to note that some diseases are rooted in psychological illness.[8] His personality was stubborn and independent. He grew progressively more frustrated and bitter as he became more embattled as a reformer.[9]

Stars Over Washington: Francis Bacon, Uranus/Neptune, and Pluto If you like to read about America's founding, Rosicrucianism, Freemasonry, and other such mystical topics, you may be interested in a discovery I've just made of a site that has so many links and articles to check out, I'm just getting started. But I want to be certain you knew about it, too, though much investigation is required to find out how much it contains concerning America. As you know, Sir Francis Bacon was an early activist within the 'New World', 'New Utopian' crowd and is thought to be the founder of English Freemasonry.

Meister Eckhart Eckhart came into prominence during the Avignon Papacy, at a time of increased tensions between monastic orders, diocesan clergy, the Franciscan Order, and Eckhart's Dominican Order of Preachers. In later life he was accused of heresy and brought up before the local Franciscan-led Inquisition, and tried as a heretic by Pope John XXII.[note 2] He seems to have died before his verdict was received.[citation needed][note 3] He was well known for his work with pious lay groups such as the Friends of God and was succeeded by his more circumspect disciples John Tauler and Henry Suso.[citation needed] Since the 19th century, he has received renewed attention.

Baconian theory of Shakespeare authorship The Baconian theory of Shakespearean authorship holds that Sir Francis Bacon, philosopher, essayist and scientist, wrote the plays, which were publicly attributed to William Shakespeare. Various explanations are offered for this alleged subterfuge, most commonly that, Bacon's rise to high office might have been hindered if it became known that he wrote plays for the public stage. Thus the plays were credited to Shakespeare, who was merely a front to shield the identity of Bacon. Bacon was the first alternative candidate suggested as the true author of Shakespeare's plays. The theory was first put forth in the mid-nineteenth century, based on perceived correspondences between the philosophical ideas found in Bacon’s writings and the works of Shakespeare. Legal and autobiographical allusions and cryptographic ciphers and codes were later found in the plays and poems to buttress the theory.

John of Ruysbroeck The Blessed John of Ruysbroeck (Dutch: Jan van Ruusbroec, Jan (or Johannes) van Ruysbroeck, pronounced [jɑn vɑn rœ.y̯zbruk, ry.zbruk]; 1293 or 1294 – 2 December 1381) was one of the Flemish mystics. Some of his main literary works include The Kingdom of the Divine Lovers, The Twelve Beguines, The Spiritual Espousals, A Mirror of Eternal Blessedness, The Little Book of Enlightenment and The Sparkling Stone. Ruysbroeck also wrote letters and short sayings from some of his oral talks have been recorded by certain of his disciples, such as Jan Van Leeuwan. He wrote in the Dutch vernacular, the language of the common people of the Low countries, rather than in Latin, the language of the Church liturgy and official texts, so as to reach a wider audience.

Bacon-Shakespeare Bacon-Shakespeare "Dramatical, or Representative Poetry, which brings the world upon the stage, is of excellent use… The care of the Ancients was that it should instruct the minds of men unto virtue. Nay, wise men and great philosophers have accounted it as the archet or musical bow of the mind." There is no real evidence that the actor Will Shakspere was the author of the Shakespeare works attributed to him. Roger Bacon Roger Bacon, OFM (/ˈbeɪkən/; c. 1214 – June 1292?; scholastic accolade Doctor Mirabilis, meaning "wonderful teacher"), was an English philosopher and Franciscan friar who placed considerable emphasis on the study of nature through empirical methods. He is sometimes credited (mainly since the nineteenth century) as one of the earliest European advocates of the modern scientific method inspired by Aristotle and later Arabic scholars such as the Muslim scientist Alhazen.[2] However, more recent re-evaluations emphasise that he was essentially a medieval thinker, with much of his "experimental" knowledge obtained from books, in the scholastic tradition.[3] A survey of how Bacon's work was received over the centuries found that it often reflected the concerns and controversies that were central to his readers.[4] Bacon studied at Oxford and may have been a disciple of Grosseteste. He became a master at Oxford, lecturing on Aristotle.

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