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A Diagram Of 21st Century Pedagogy -

A Diagram Of 21st Century Pedagogy -
The modern learner has to sift through a lot of information. That means higher level thinking skills like analysis and evaluation are necessary just to reduce all the noise and establish the credibility of information. There is also the matter of utility. Evaluating information depends as much on context and circumstance as it does the nature of the data itself. The essay full of fluff may distill quite nicely down to a 140 character tweet. A trivial fact about governments may appear useless in a research paper on the 3 branches of government, but could find utility in a project-based learning artifact on the evolution of government systems worldwide. Context matters, and the diagram from edorigami below captures this, though not from the perspective of the student and content knowledge, but the teacher and various pedagogical components themselves, including Higher-Order Thinking Skills, Peer Collaboration, and Media Fluency.

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6 Principles Of Genius Hour In The Classroom Genius Hour In The Classroom: 6 Principles Of Genius Hour by Terry Heick Update: We did a t-shirt campaign of this graphic last year and it sold decently (if 13 t-shirts can be considered ‘decent.’). It’s still available if you wanted a t-shirt with a kind of learning model on it. You know. 27 Simple Ways To Get Students Excited About Innovation Recently, our neighbors introduced us to a couple of their friends who are from Spain. They are both professors here and have a kid who will be entering college in the US this fall. We were chatting about where we’ve lived and where we’d like to, and the topic of taxes came up. Top 100 Influential Education Blogs UPDATE: You can see an updated list here. Over the last 5 years there was a sharp increase in the number of education blogs in various areas such as art education, technology, creative writing, mathematics, or drama, from primary school level to lifelong learning approaches. Despite this surge in education blogs, there haven't been many attempts at classifying the blogs according to their authority.

Yes, You Can Teach and Assess Creativity! A recent blog by Grant Wiggins affirmed what I have long believed about creativity: it is a 21st-century skill we can teach and assess. Creativity fosters deeper learning, builds confidence and creates a student ready for college and career. However, many teachers don't know how to implement the teaching and assessment of creativity in their classrooms. While we may have the tools to teach and assess content, creativity is another matter, especially if we want to be intentional about teaching it as a 21st-century skill. In a PBL project, some teachers focus on just one skill, while others focus on many.

Using the E-Portfolio to Validate Student Learning February 12, 2013 By: Ken Scott, EdD in Instructional Design, Teaching with Technology Too often our students consider their work in the classroom as required assignments—not work that has anything to do with what they will be doing in the real world. A Quick Guide To Questioning In The Classroom A Guide to Questioning in the Classroom by TeachThought Staff This post was promoted by Noet Scholarly Tools who are offering TeachThought readers 20% off their entire order at Noet.com with coupon code TEACHTHOUGHT (enter the coupon code after you’ve signed in)! Get started with their Harvard Fiction Classics or introductory packages on Greek and Latin classics. Noet asked us to write about inquiry because they believe it’s important, and relates to their free research app for the classics. This is part 1 of a 2-part series on questioning in the classroom.

10 Resources For Helping Students Take Initiative There are so many movements and initiatives in education. The vocabulary changes from time to time, and it’s important to keep current. There’s always something new. We try new things, read new things, and emulate successes in other people’s classroom. Step by Step: Designing Personalized Learning Experiences For Students The phrase “personalized learning” gets tossed around a lot in education circles. Sometimes it’s used in the context of educational technology tools that offer lessons keyed to the academic level of individual students. Other times it’s referring to the personal touch of a teacher getting to know a student, learning about their interests and tailoring lessons to meet both their needs and their passion areas. As with most education jargon, the phrase isn’t fixed, but it usually connects to the idea that not all students need the same thing at the same time. It implies choice, multiple pathways to learning, many ways to demonstrate competency and resists the notion that all students learn the same way. Educator Mia MacMeekin has put together a clear infographic highlighting some of the ways teachers design “personalized” curriculum.

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