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U News, Videos, Reviews and Gossip - Lifehacker

U News, Videos, Reviews and Gossip - Lifehacker

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Battushig Myanganbayar aced an edX MOOC, then gave lessons to MIT. Courtesy of Jeffrey R. Young This article is part of Future Tense, which is a partnership of Slate, the New America Foundation, and Arizona State University. Physicists Seek To Lose The Lecture As Teaching Tool The lecture is one of the oldest forms of education there is. "Before printing someone would read the books to everybody who would copy them down," says Joe Redish, a physics professor at the University of Maryland. But lecturing has never been an effective teaching technique and now that information is everywhere, some say it's a waste of time. Indeed, physicists have the data to prove it. When Eric Mazur began teaching physics at Harvard, he started out teaching the same way he had been taught. xPugetSound - Dream Out Loud: Transform Ideas into Action About this event This year's theme was built upon the foundation of the 2009 TEDxPugetSound. Last year's theme was about reconnecting business owners with the passion that inspired them to start their businesses. This year's TEDxPugetSound is about the critical importance of innovating to stay competitive and fresh and moving forward. Our theme was inspired by this quote by Anais Nin: "Dreams pass into the reality of action.

The Best Places to Get a Top Grade Education For Free We all want a good education. We want to learn, become better informed and be at the top of our “A Game.” However, one of the most common complaints that arise from getting a great education always circles back to costs. Whether it’s a community college, digital school, university or night class, school costs money. Not just pennies, top dollars. Enough to break the bank. BrainTrain - Changing the Way People Think Insurance coverage varies according to insurance company and state, but all major carriers now cover Cognitive Rehabilitation. It is billed in 15 minute units with fees paid at $35 to $55 per unit, depending on the region of the country. A treatment plan is required and progress must be documented. In addition, the patient needs to be qualified to show that he or she can possibly benefit from this form of treatment. Currently, neurological disorders, strokes, cancer treatment (medicines used to treat cancer are toxic to the brain) and traumatic brain injuries are covered. Alzheimer's is usually not covered.

Take college and university courses online completely free In recent years massive open online courses (MOOCs) have become a trend in online education. The term was coined in 2008 by David Cormier, manager of web communications and innovations at the University of Prince Edward Island. The first MOOC was created the previous year, at Utah State University. Today, there are hundreds of thousands of courses available online at no cost. You can study anything from business to zoology in your own home at no cost. Brainfuck Brainfuck is an esoteric programming language noted for its extreme minimalism. The language consists of only eight simple commands and an instruction pointer. Nevertheless, it was shown to be Turing-complete. It is designed to challenge and amuse programmers, and was not made to be suitable for practical use. It was created in 1993 by Urban Müller. The language's name is a reference to the vulgar term "brain fuck", which refers to things so complicated or unusual that they exceed the limits of one's understanding.

Gestures tell us much Gestures Offer Insight By Ipke Wachsmuth October 2006 Hand and arm movements do much more than accent words; they provide context for understanding Our body movements always convey something about us to other people. The body "speaks" whether we are sitting or standing, talking or just listening. On a blind date, how the two individuals position themselves tells a great deal about how the evening will unfold: Is she leaning in to him or away? Dunning–Kruger effect The Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias in which low-ability individuals suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly assessing their ability as much higher than it really is. Psychologists David Dunning and Justin Kruger attributed this bias to a metacognitive incapacity, on the part of those with low ability, to recognize their ineptitude and evaluate their competence accurately. Their research also suggests corollaries: high-ability individuals may underestimate their relative competence and may erroneously assume that tasks which are easy for them are also easy for others.[1] Dunning and Kruger have postulated that the effect is the result of internal illusion in those of low ability and external misperception in those of high ability: "The miscalibration of the incompetent stems from an error about the self, whereas the miscalibration of the highly competent stems from an error about others.

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