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Online Journal Database

Online Journal Database

http://openj-gate.org/

Related:  Historical Information Plus ResourcesOa

What are Historical Sources? — Faculty of History A source is anything that has been left behind by the past. It might be a document, but it might alternatively be a building or a picture or a piece of ephemera – a train ticket perhaps or a plastic cup. They are called 'sources' because they provide us with information which can add to the sum of our knowledge of the past. Oxford Open Oxford Open OUP Supports Open Access Oxford University Press (OUP) is mission-driven to facilitate the widest possible dissemination of high-quality research. We embrace both green and gold open access (OA) publishing to support this mission.

Open Access The Case for Open Access Open Access (OA) stands for unrestricted access and unrestricted reuse. Here’s why that matters. Most publishers own the rights to the articles in their journals. Anyone who wants to read the articles must pay to access them. Anyone who wants to use the articles in any way must obtain permission from the publisher and is often required to pay an additional fee.

Why Study History? (1998) By Peter N. Stearns People live in the present. They plan for and worry about the future. History, however, is the study of the past. Given all the demands that press in from living in the present and anticipating what is yet to come, why bother with what has been? OAIster Access to OAIster A freely accessible site for searching only OAIster records is available at Additionally, OAIster records are fully accessible through WorldCat.org, and appear as WorldCat.org search results along with records from thousands of libraries worldwide. The OAIster database is searchable on the OCLC FirstSearch service, providing another valuable access point for this rich database and a complement to other FirstSearch databases. Contributing to OAIster The OAIster database is included in WorldCat and metadata harvesting goes through the WorldCat Digital Collection Gateway.

A Linguist Explains the Grammar of Shipping - The Toast Our resident linguist’s previous work for The Toast can be found here. Let’s talk about shipping. No, not the transportation of goods over the water, but that feeling when you want a couple fictional characters to smush their faces against each other and never let go. The word ship itself has an interesting enough grammar, not to mention its variants like OTP and broT3, but my favourite topic in the linguistics of shipping is one that has an actual academic paper written about it: The Fandom Pairing Name: Blends and the Phonology/Orthography Interface is a paper about ship names. You know, like Johnlock and Brittana and Dramione.* It was published in the Journal of Onomastics by Cara DiGirolamo, a linguist and also a friend.

The geography of academic knowledge Our team recently had the opportunity of working with some submission data from SAGE journals. Amongst other things, the data tell us where authors of articles come from, and primary discipline of the journal they are submitting to. We therefore decided to map out the geography of submissions for journals in five categories: Communication (n = 22), Clinical Medicine and Critical Care (51), Cultural Studies (7), Engineering and Computing (34), and Management and Organization Studies (28). A few broad patterns are apparent here. everything elearning. Learning Objects Overview Learning objects (or RLO - reusable learning object) have been the hype of the elearning industry since 2001. They have been hailed as the future reality of learning...and as idealistic, but unattainable view for education. Separating the hype from reality is still an ongoing activity.

Australia, we need to talk about the way we speak We must reclaim rhetoric as an important fixture of Australian culture, teach it to all students in our schools and raise our standards of communication. Photo: iStock Let's get things straight about the origins of the Australian accent. Aussie-speak developed in the early days of colonial settlement from a cocktail of English, Irish, Aboriginal and German – before another mystery influence was slipped into the mix. The Australian alphabet cocktail was spiked by alcohol.

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