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Lester Dent Pulp Paper Master Fiction Plot

Lester Dent Pulp Paper Master Fiction Plot
This is a formula, a master plot, for any 6000 word pulp story. It has worked on adventure, detective, western and war-air. It tells exactly where to put everything. It shows definitely just what must happen in each successive thousand words. No yarn of mine written to the formula has yet failed to sell. The business of building stories seems not much different from the business of building anything else. Here's how it starts: One of these DIFFERENT things would be nice, two better, three swell. A different murder method could be--different. If the victims are killed by ordinary methods, but found under strange and identical circumstances each time, it might serve, the reader of course not knowing until the end, that the method of murder is ordinary. Scribes who have their villain's victims found with butterflies, spiders or bats stamped on them could conceivably be flirting with this gag. Probably it won't do a lot of good to be too odd, fanciful or grotesque with murder methods.

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