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Eight Ways of Looking at Intelligence

Eight Ways of Looking at Intelligence
Big Ideas In “Thirteen Ways of Looking At A Blackbird,” poet Wallace Stevens takes something familiar—an ordinary black bird—and by looking at it from many different perspectives, makes us think about it in new ways. With apologies to Stevens, we’re going to take the same premise, but change the subject by considering eight ways of looking at intelligence—eight perspectives provided by the science of learning. A few words about that term: The science of learning is a relatively new discipline born of an agglomeration of fields: cognitive science, psychology, philosophy, neuroscience. Its project is to apply the methods of science to human endeavors—teaching and learning—that have for centuries been mostly treated as an art. As with anything to do with our idiosyncratic and unpredictable species, there is still a lot of art involved in teaching and learning. 1. Situations can be internal or external. On one level this is obvious, but on another it is quite radical. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/06/eight-ways-of-looking-at-intelligence/

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The Physics Of Productivity: Newton’s Laws Of Getting Stuff Done In 1687, Sir Isaac Newton published his groundbreaking book, Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy, which described his three laws of motion. In the process, Newton laid the foundation for classical mechanics and redefined the way the world looked at physics and science. What most people don’t know, however, is that Newton’s three laws of motion can be used as an interesting analogy for increasing your productivity, simplifying your work, and improving your life.

Bill Gates: ‘It would be great if our education stuff worked but…’ Bill Gates (Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images) “It would be great if our education stuff worked, but that we won’t know for probably a decade.” That’s what Bill Gates said on Sept. 21 (see video below) about the billions of dollars his foundation has plowed into education reform during a nearly hour-long interview he gave at Harvard University. He repeated the “we don’t know if it will work” refrain about his reform efforts a few days later during a panel discussion at the Clinton Global Initiative. Hmmm. Teachers around the country are saddled every single year with teacher evaluation systems that his foundation has funded, based on no record of success and highly questionable “research.”

25 Critical Thinking Strategies For The Modern Learner Critical thinking is the engine of learning. Within this complex process or so many other relevant themes that contribute to learning: creativity, analysis, evaluation, innovation, application, and scores of other verbs from various learning taxonomies. So the following infographic from Mentoring Minds is immediately relevant to all educators, and students as well. It’s a bit of a mash of Habits of Mind, various 21st century learning frameworks, and the aforementioned learning taxonomies, promoting collaboration, problem-solving, and real-world connections (standard “critical thinking fare” with Habits of Mind-sounding phrases such as “Open-Mindedness”). At the bottom, it pushes a bit further, however, offering 25 critical thinking strategies to help support progressive learning. While a few are a bit vague (#12 says to “Think critically daily,” and #17 is simply “Well-informed”), overall the graphic does pool together several important themes into a single image.

4 Essential Rules Of 21st Century Learning 4 Essential Rules Of 21st Century Learning by Jennifer Rita Nichols The term “21st century” has become an integral part of educational thinking and planning for the future. Educators and administrators are actively searching for ways to prepare students for the future, and the educational system has been evolving faster than ever before. Various studies have shown us that rote memorization is not an effective learning strategy, and that teacher-centered classrooms may not be the most efficiently structured ones for student engagement. However, despite learning about the skills that students will need to develop to become successful in the 21st century, as well as what beliefs about education may be worth hanging onto or throwing away, schools and teachers are left trying to figure out what their role needs to be in the education of their 21st century students.

How to Implement Deep Learning Characteristics in the Classroom Deep learning is the foundation on which I instruct my students; whether it is through the use of practical thinking skills, human dimension activities, and/or data gathering. There are other deep learning characteristics I implement daily, but these are most commonly used in my classroom. These strategies help to... Deep learning is the foundation on which I instruct my students; whether it is through the use of practical thinking skills, human dimension activities, and/or data gathering. There are other deep learning characteristics I implement daily, but these are most commonly used in my classroom. These strategies help to keep me focused on one common goal for all my students: to promote better learning outcomes for all students-ones that are transformational.

How To Stop Being Lazy And Get More Done - 5 Expert Tips Some days the to-do list seems bottomless. Just looking at it is exhausting. We all want to know how to stop being lazy and get more done. Connectivism must abandon its ideas? Two Catalan authors see Three problems with the connectivist conception of learning and challenge its core ideas (p. 8): “the idea that knowledge is distributed in the network”, “the idea of learning and knowing as individual, interpretative recognition of connective patterns”, and “the idea of learning as the association of subsymbolic entities (neurons)”. I am not convinced. I recall: Knowledge of a society lies in connections between people or resources; knowledge of an individual lies in connections between neurons. Survey: Learning '21st-Century Skills' Linked to Work Success - Teaching Now A study released today by the polling firm Gallup Inc. finds that students' exposure to so-called 21st-century skills in school correlates positively with "perceived quality of work" later in life . For the study, which was commissioned by Microsoft Partners in Learning and the Pearson Foundation, Gallup asked 1,014 individuals aged 18 to 35 how much experience they had with certain advanced learning skills during their last year of school, including college or graduate school, if applicable. (Cognitive testing conducted by Gallup prior to the survey determined that individuals at the upper end of the age range would have comparable recall of their last school year.) The skills in question—often dubbed 21st-century skills because of their reputed connection to present-day workplace demands—included collaboration, knowledge construction, global awareness, use of technology for learning, real-world problem solving, and skilled communication.

3 Knowledge Domains For The 21st Century Student Thinking in the 21st century is just different. That doesn’t mean we’re all suddenly omnipotent cyborgs, nor does it mean we’ve all become mindless social media addicts that spend our cognitive might tapping, swiping, and drooling on our smartphone and tablet screens. But just as the 19th century presented unique challenges to information processing than the 18th or 20th, the 21st century is different than the one before, or that the one that will come after. punyamishra.com recently released the following graphic that I thought was interesting, mainly in that it identified knowledge types for modern learning, settling on Foundational, Humanistic, and Meta Knowledge. 3 Knowledge Domains For The 21st Century Student 1.

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