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Cube

Cube
Time Series Data Collection & Analysis Cube is a system for collecting timestamped events and deriving metrics. By collecting events rather than metrics, Cube lets you compute aggregate statistics post hoc. It also enables richer analysis, such as quantiles and histograms of arbitrary event sets. Cube is built on MongoDB and available under the Apache License on GitHub. Collecting Data An event in Cube is simply a JSON object with a type, time, and arbitrary data. Cube’s collector receives events and saves them to MongoDB. Querying Events Cube defines a simple language for querying events. You can intersect filters and customize which event fields are returned. request(browser).gt(duration, 250).lt(duration, 500) Cube supports both HTTP GET and WebSockets for retrieving events. Querying Metrics You can also use Cube to group events by time, map to derived values, and reduce to aggregate metrics. The first few results of which appear as: sum(request.eq(path, "/search")) sum(request(duration))

http://square.github.io/cube/

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