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An Evolutionary Architecture - John Frazer

An Evolutionary Architecture - John Frazer
Electronic version of An Evolutionary Architecture An Evolutionary Architecture was published in January 1995 to coincide with an exhibition of the same name at the Architectural Association. It concentrates on the work of Diploma Unit 11 run by John and Julia Frazer (with Pete Silver and Guy Westbrook) between 1989 and 1996, but includes formative work by the author dating back to his diploma prize-winning project at the AA in 1969 and related research work at Cambridge University. The book investigates the fundamental form-generating processes in architecture, considering architecture as a form of artificial life, and proposing a genetic representation in a form of DNA-like code-script, which can then be subject to developmental and evolutionary processes in response to the user and the environment. The aim of an evolutionary architecture is to achieve in the built environment the symbiotic behaviour and metabolic balance found in the natural environment.

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Introduction to Genetic Algorithm Introduction to Genetic Algorithms. Physics, Biology, Economy or Sociology often have to deal with the classical problem of optimization. Economy particularly has become specialist of that field1. Examining the Society of Mind To appear in the journal Computing and Informatics. Push Singh 28 October 2003 push@mit.edu Media Lab Massachusetts Institute of Technology 20 Ames Street Cambridge, MA 02139 United States I485/I585: Biologically Inspired Computing Biological organisms cope with the demands of their environments using solutions quite unlike the traditional human-engineered approaches to problem solving. Biological systems tend to be adaptive, reactive, and distributed. Bio-inspired computing is a field devoted to tackling complex problems using computational methods modeled after design principles encountered in nature. This course is strongly grounded on the foundations of complex systems and theoretical biology.

An Evolutionary Architecture - John Frazer Exhibition The exhibition accompanying the launch of the book was unique in not only having a virtual version available on the internet, but also in achieving the first ever online virtual interaction with the development of an evolving form in a remote exhibition. A model of the system, called the Interactivator, allowed both virtual and actual visitors to make selections or propose (via a bank of switches) genetic information to influence the evolution of the form. The development of specific instances of the form was also influenced by the physical environment of the exhibition space, as detected by data from sensors of temperature, humidity, noise, smoke level and so forth. The Interactivator could also reproduce itself by allowing the program of the model to be downloaded to remote sites. As it replicated itself each replication took on a divergent evolutionary path, the results of which could also be fed back to the central model to contribute to the gene pool.

Genetic Algorithm Tutorial Genetic Algorithms in Plain English Introduction The aim of this tutorial is to explain genetic algorithms sufficiently for you to be able to use them in your own projects. Main page - Introduction to Genetic Algorithms - Tutorial with Interactive Java Applets These pages introduce some fundamentals of genetic algorithms. Pages are intended to be used for learning about genetic algorithms without any previous knowledge from this area. Only some knowledge of computer programming is assumed. You can find here several interactive Java applets demonstrating work of genetic algorithms.

Neural Network Library project in C# home page Welcome to my Neural Network project home page. You can find here the first version of a .NET neural network library and it's API documentation. This library was developed in C# as a .NET class library. I've also written a graphical interface to design neural networks and a few demos. Randall D. Beer Dr. Paul Williams Research Interests My primary research interest is in understanding how coordinated behavior arises from the dynamical interaction of an animal's nervous system, its body and its environment. Toward this end, I work on the evolution and analysis of dynamical "nervous systems" for model agents, neuromechanical modeling of animals, biologically-inspired robotics, and dynamical systems approaches to behavior and cognition. More generally, I am interested in computational and theoretical biology, including models of metabolism, gene regulation and development.

Architecture in Formation Edited by Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa and Aaron Sprecher Featuring essays by Pablo Lorenzo-Eiroa, Aaron Sprecher, Georges Teyssot, Mario Carpo, Patrik Schumacher, Bernard Cache, Mark Linder, David Theodore, Evan Douglis, Ingeborg Rocker and Christian Lange, Antoine Picon, Michael Wen-Sen Su, Chris Perry, Alexis Meier, Achim Menges and Martin Bressani, and interviews with George Legendre, Alessandra Ponte, Karl Chu, CiroNajle, and Greg Lynn. Architecture in Formation is the first digital architecture manual that bridges multiple relationships between theory and practice, proposing a vital resource to structure the upcoming second digital revolution. Sixteen essays from practitioners, historians and theorists look at how information processing informs and is informed by architecture. Twenty-nine experimental projects propose radical means to inform the new upcoming digital architecture.

Robots evolve to exploit inadvertent cues Human interaction heavily depends on inadvertent cues: A competitor's sweaty handshake before a negotiation, a girl blushing when introducing herself, or the trace of a smile crossing the face of a poker player all convey important information. Sara Mitri and colleagues at the Laboratory of Intelligent Systems (disclaimer: my former lab) at the EPFL in Switzerland have now shown that it is not just humans who can develop, detect and use inadvertent cues to their advantage (PNAS: "Evolution of Information Suppression in Communicating Robots with Conflicting Interests"). The researchers set up a group of S-bots equipped with omnidirectional cameras and light-emitting rings around their body in a bio-inspired foraging task (see picture above).

An Introduction to Neural Networks Prof. Leslie Smith Centre for Cognitive and Computational Neuroscience Department of Computing and Mathematics University of Stirling. lss@cs.stir.ac.uk last major update: 25 October 1996: minor update 22 April 1998 and 12 Sept 2001: links updated (they were out of date) 12 Sept 2001; fix to math font (thanks Sietse Brouwer) 2 April 2003 This document is a roughly HTML-ised version of a talk given at the NSYN meeting in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 28 February 1996, then updated a few times in response to comments received. Inside Smartgeometry Inside Smartgeometry: Expanding the Architectural Possibilities of Computational Design Edited by Brady Peters and Terri Peters On behalf of the Smartgeometry group, we would like to invite you to the launch of "Inside Smartgeometry: Expanding the Architectural Possibilities of Computational Design" edited by Brady and Terri Peters and published by John Wiley & Sons. The richly illustrated, hard cover book features 24 original texts from members of the SG community.

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