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Judith Butler Explained with Cats

Judith Butler Explained with Cats
Following hot on the heels of Foucault Explained with Hipsters, here’s JB’s Gender Trouble explained in Socratic dialogue style. With cats. All page references from Butler, J. (1990 [2008: 1999]). Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. New York; London: Routledge. Got any more ideas for philosophy/sociology/gender theory you’d like to see explained in comic form? Like this: Like Loading...

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A Narcissist’s Love Letter When I say I’m in love with you, I mean I love the way I feel when I’m with you. I love myself through you. I love seeing myself through your eyes. I love seeing myself through my eyes imagining how I look through your eyes. I love having someone new to tell my stories to, to express my opinions, and to share my profound theories and beliefs about the important things in life. Black Feminism LIVES! What: This is a weekend retreat to practice and celebrate the technology of black feminist breathing. We will use breathing, mantras and poetry rooted in short wise sayings from black feminist teachers and writers as a resource for mindfulness, sustainability and connection to legacy and purpose.

Joker's next move will shock Bat-fans "Batman" #17, due out Wednesday, February 13, wraps up "Death of the Family," a months-long story arc in all of the "Batman"-related comic books, in which The Joker has gone after Batman by threatening and capturing his friends and allies, members of his Bat-"family." Writer Scott Snyder unleashes a climactic bombshell, a final confrontation between The Joker and the Dark Knight. (DC Comics is owned by Time Warner, which owns CNN.) The title of the story echoes 1988's "A Death in the Family," which told the story of The Joker's brutal murder of the second Robin, Jason Todd.

15 Black Women Visual Artists You Should Know Visual Artists rarely get enough credit and recognition, but black female visual artists are a group that seems to be left out of the spotlight completely. Growing up as a young black female visual artist, there seemed to be no one who looked like me to look up to. But black female visual artists do exist, and they are creating some of the best art out today. Here are some of our favorites: "Kara Walker (American, b. 1969) is best known for her room-size tableaux of black cut-paper silhouettes that examine the underbelly of America's racial and gender tensions. Her works often address such highly charged themes as power, repression,history, race, and sexuality.

The Myth Of Misandry If you're a feminist with access to the Internet, you've almost certainly stumbled upon the term misandry—i.e. contempt for men—offered as the societal counterpoint to misogyny. It's become so obnoxiously ubiquitous that I'm surprised Time didn't include it on their dubious list of words to ban in 2014. Twitter is chock full of dudes popping up out of their sad little man-holes crying “oppression!” any time someone breathes the words male privilege, and there are huge swathes of Reddit devoted to proving that misandry is nothing short of a rampant plague destroying the moral fabric of our society. Maybe you've even encountered it personally; perhaps you've been accused of it because of your villainous, man-hating ways.

Aerial Photos of Giant Google-Funded Solar Farm Caught in Green Energy Debate One big problem with renewable energy projects is that they have to go somewhere. They have to occupy a part of the very environment that their proponents are often trying to save. Photographer Jamey Stillings beautifully captures this tension in his images of the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (ISEGS). Located in Southern California’s Mojave Desert, the plant aims to eventually be the largest solar thermal power plant in the world – making enough electricity to run 140,000 homes all by focusing the sun’s energy to create steam. It's Amazing How Much The 'Perfect Body' Has Changed In 100 Years A woman with a "perfect body" in 1930 would barely get a second look from Hollywood producers or model casting agents today. Addiction and eating disorder recovery site Rehabs.com worked with digital marketing agency Fractl on a project looking at the origins of Body Mass Index (BMI) measurements, and how the bodies of ideal women have compared to national averages over time. And their findings show that models and movie stars are getting smaller than the average American woman at unprecedented rates. Though BMI measurements don't distinguish between fat and muscle, and are thus fairly inaccurate in determining whether someone is obese or not, BMI data from the past makes for interesting comparisons. According to the Center for Disease Control, the BMI of the average American women has steadily increased over the past half a century, from 24.9 in 1960 to 26.5 in the present day.

I Like Your Flaws I like how you mispronounce words sometimes, how you fumble and stammer and stutter looking for the right ones to say and the right ways to say them. I appreciate that you find language challenging, because it is, because everything manmade is challenging. Including man, including you. When you sleep on your side, I like to map the constellations between your beauty marks freckles pimples, the minuscule mountains that sprinkle your back. I like the tufts of hair you forgot to shave and the way you smell when you haven’t showered in a while; I like the sleep left in your eyes.

Women's History Month: 10 Things to Thank Feminists for By joslyngray | Bringing a trumpet to a protest totally makes it a party! Oh, those wacky feminists. Always burning their bras and eating granola and asking for equality ‘n’ stuff. Like, you know, the right to vote, control your own money, and leave a man who beats the crap out of you. Crazy stuff like that. iF design award 2012 - hansgrohe prize winners may 31, 2012 iF concept design award 2012 hansgrohe prize winners ‘washit’ by ahmet burak aktas, salih berk ilhan, adem onalan, burak soylemez of turkey grand prize winner the theme for this year’s hansgrohe prize focused on the topic of making the act of showering a more pleasurable and ‘greener’ experience. held in connection with the international iF concept design award for young talent, out of the vast number of entries submitted 150 shortlisted projects were evaluated by a jury; andreas haug, phonex design, stuttgart; jan heisterhagen and dr. carsten tessmer, both of hansgrohe SE, schiltach who awarded the following prizes to six international teams: top entry, ‘iWashit’ designed by ahmet burak aktas, salih berk ilhan, adem onalan, burak soylemez of turkey is a shower / washing machine combination. greywater from a shower is collected, cleaned and filtered to be used for doing a load of laundry. ‘shower calendar by matthias laschke second runner-up

Syllabus Collection The Consortium’s Syllabus Collection provides easy access to a wide range of courses taught about topics related to gender, armed conflict, peacemaking and postwar reconstruction, as well as feminist perspectives on global politics. The collection is intended to support the expansion and strengthening of education in this field by acting as a resource for teachers who want to design new courses or to update existing ones. Researchers, as well as readers new to the field, may also find it useful to explore these syllabi, as they represent a distillation of the readings that professors have found most useful in teaching about their areas of expertise.

Why No One Can Design a Better Speculum The gynecological device may have an ethically fraught history, but it's hard to improve on the design. Morphart Creation/Shutterstock/The Atlantic Few women enjoy pelvic exams: the crinkly paper dress, the awkward questions, the stirrups, the vague fear that can comes with doctors’s visits of any kind (what if they find something abnormal, something bad, something cancerous?).

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