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Ontologie est surfaite - Catégories, liens et tags

Ontologie est surfaite - Catégories, liens et tags
Ontology is Overrated: Categories, Links, and Tags This piece is based on two talks I gave in the spring of 2005 -- one at the O'Reilly ETech conference in March, entitled "Ontology Is Overrated", and one at the IMCExpo in April entitled "Folksonomies & Tags: The rise of user-developed classification." The written version is a heavily edited concatenation of those two talks. Today I want to talk about categorization, and I want to convince you that a lot of what we think we know about categorization is wrong. In particular, I want to convince you that many of the ways we're attempting to apply categorization to the electronic world are actually a bad fit, because we've adopted habits of mind that are left over from earlier strategies. I also want to convince you that what we're seeing when we see the Web is actually a radical break with previous categorization strategies, rather than an extension of them. PART I: Classification and Its Discontents # Q: What is Ontology? And yet. Domain

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Visualizing Del.icio.us Roundup I have been coming across many del.icio.us tools to visualize usage during my daily researching hours. So many, that I have decided to start making note of the ones I come across. From the span of about two weeks, I have been collecting as many as I could find. I will list each one along with a description. Enjoy! There’s a couple more that I have in mind, but they don’t seem to be working at the moment. Cogito » Blog Archive » The Ontology Myth For the past year, I have been observing a phenomenon in the US market, that of the spread of the ‘myth’ of ontology. Ontologies are important elements for understanding text through semantic analysis, but they are insufficient (and, often, not even necessary) to resolve the problem of how to handle unstructured knowledge. Nonetheless, according to this ‘idea,’ they say that if you have a complete ontology, you don’t need anything else. Instead, semantic technology should be able to do it all automatically (for example, the typical activities correlated to knowledge management activities such as automatic categorization and discovery of knowledge and relationships between data).

Ontology (information science) In computer science and information science, an ontology formally represents knowledge as a hierarchy of concepts within a domain, using a shared vocabulary to denote the types, properties and interrelationships of those concepts.[1][2] Ontologies are the structural frameworks for organizing information and are used in artificial intelligence, the Semantic Web, systems engineering, software engineering, biomedical informatics, library science, enterprise bookmarking, and information architecture as a form of knowledge representation about the world or some part of it. The creation of domain ontologies is also fundamental to the definition and use of an enterprise architecture framework. 19 of the Best Infographics from 2010 Research can sometimes be a bit of a chore, but when knowledge is wrapped up in charts, cartoons, or even some heart-holding robots, suddenly "information" isn't such a scary word. What do Facebook's 500 million users look like? Who's suing whom in the mobile world?

SPEAR Algorithm The SPEAR algorithm is a tool for ranking users in social networks by their expertise and influence within the community. In 2009, my co-worker Ching-man Au Yeung from University of Southampton and I presented the SPEAR ranking algorithm in our joint paper Telling Experts from Spammers: Expertise Ranking in Folksonomies at the ACM SIGIR 2009 Conference in Boston, USA. The graph-based SPEAR ranking algorithm (Spamming-resistant Expertise Analysis and Ranking) is a new technique to measure the expertise of users by analyzing their activities. The focus is on the ability of users to find new, high quality information in the Internet. Tag (metadata) Tagging was popularized by websites associated with Web 2.0 and is an important feature of many Web 2.0 services. It is now also part of some desktop software. A Description of the Equator and Some Otherlands, collaborative hypercinema portal, produced by documenta X, 1997. User upload page associating user contributed media with the term Tag.

How JavaScript & HTML5 Are Remaking the Web The Future Web Series is supported by Elsevier's SciVerse Application Marketplace and Developer Network. The SciVerse applications platform enables developers to build apps based on trusted scientific content. Learn more. HTML5 is no longer just a buzz word. It — along with JavaScript and CSS3 — is quickly helping reshape perceptions of what a web browser and web standards can achieve. With browsers implementing more HTML5 features across platforms and devices, developers are starting to integrate many of the new features and frameworks into their web apps, websites and web designs.

Introduction au Web sémantique The Semantic Web (more technically known as a "Web of data") allows the machines to understand the semantics, the significance of the information on the Web. It extends the network of links between Web pages classic by a network of link between structured data thus allowing agents automated to more intelligently access different sources of data on the Web and, in this way, tasks (research, learning, etc.) more accurate for users. The term was coined by Tim Berners-Lee, co-inventor of the Web and W3C Director, who oversees the development of Semantic Web standards proposals. Most of the time, when we pronounce the end of Semantic Web, we're talking different technologies that hide behind. The best-known examples are RDF (Resource Description Framework) which corresponds to a model of information, and the exchange of data in RDF formats for communicating between different applications (RDF/XML, RDF/JSON, N3, Turtle, N-Triples and others). Quote from:

The complex dynamics of collaborative tagging The debate within the Web community over the optimal means by which to organize information often pits formalized classifications against distributed collaborative tagging systems. A number of questions remain unanswered, however, regarding the nature of collaborative tagging systems including whether coherent categorization schemes can emerge from unsupervised tagging by users. This paper uses data from the social bookmarking site delicio. us to examine the dynamics of collaborative tagging systems. In particular, we examine whether the distribution of the frequency of use of tags for "popular" sites with a long history (many tags and many users) can be described by a power law distribution, often characteristic of what are considered complex systems. We produce a generative model of collaborative tagging in order to understand the basic dynamics behind tagging, including how a power law distribution of tags could arise.

Responsive Web Design The English architect Christopher Wren once quipped that his chosen field “aims for Eternity,” and there’s something appealing about that formula: Unlike the web, which often feels like aiming for next week, architecture is a discipline very much defined by its permanence. Article Continues Below A building’s foundation defines its footprint, which defines its frame, which shapes the facade. Each phase of the architectural process is more immutable, more unchanging than the last. Semantic Web The Semantic Web is a collaborative movement led by international standards body the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).[1] The standard promotes common data formats on the World Wide Web. By encouraging the inclusion of semantic content in web pages, the Semantic Web aims at converting the current web, dominated by unstructured and semi-structured documents into a "web of data". The Semantic Web stack builds on the W3C's Resource Description Framework (RDF).[2] According to the W3C, "The Semantic Web provides a common framework that allows data to be shared and reused across application, enterprise, and community boundaries".[2] The term was coined by Tim Berners-Lee for a web of data that can be processed by machines.[3]

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