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Build A Solar Heating Panel With Soda Cans

Build A Solar Heating Panel With Soda Cans
If you’ve got good sun exposure on one side of your house, you can take advantage of free heat from the sun with this DIY solar heating panel, which uses old soda cans to collect and transfer the sun’s energy into your house. Sometimes, low-tech solar devices are much better than high-tech ones for home use, as they not only tend to be cheaper to make, but will also last much longer before any repairs or maintenance are necessary. And even better, they can be built in part from repurposed or recycled components, which is something you don’t see very often in new solar devices. This solar space heater design uses old soda cans to increase the surface area for heat transfer inside of it, and in its most basic design, uses no external power to move the air. Double-glazed glass or polycarbonate panels make up the front of the device, allowing the sun’s rays to enter it while restricting heat loss to the outside air, and the box is also insulated for more efficiency. Source: Blackle Mag Related:

http://www.whydontyoutrythis.com/2013/05/build-a-solar-heating-panel-with-soda-cans.html

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DIY Solar Heater Made Of Cans For Home Heating At the end, the solar absorber is painted black and placed in the diy solar panels casing. The casing is covered with plexiglass that we attach to the frame and thoroughly corked with silicone. Polycarbonate / plexiglass is slightly convex in order to gain greater strength. You can see installed solar absorber without plexiglass in picture 18. DIY Solar panels - air heaters made of pop cans It is really simple and cheap to build DIY solar panels for supplemental home heating, and it heats the air directly. The most interesting is the fact that collector is almost entirely constructed out of empty aluminum cans! Housing for solar collector is made of wood (plywood 15mm), while its front is 3 mm (0.12 inches) Plexiglas/polycarbonate (you can use tempered glass as well).

Set Up a Geeky Media Center that Non-Geeks Can Actually Use You need Win7 MC, 7MC, if you want to record ClearQAM TV. The previous MC versions don't do it out of the box without complex hacks. I started trying to build a TV recorder in 2000. DIY Solar Air Heater From Old Downspouts And Scraps Image Credit: Regulator We all know you can make these from pop or beer cans but did you know to get more air flow and thus better heating you can use downspouts? I found this picture heavy article on how to make one and man, I need to get on this, I think this winter is going to be cold here in Nebraska, so I might as well save some $$ on my heating bills. DIY Coke Can Solar Heating Panel Upcycling is a way of life here, but that is only one reason I love our new Coke Can Solar Heating Panel. The best part is all that lovely heat in our old house. Before we installed the panel, we often saw winter temperatures warmer OUTSIDE than inside. Admittedly, the winters in Northland aren’t known for being punishing, but going outside to get warmer isn’t something I like to do.

New Car Engine Sends Shock Waves Through Auto Industry Despite shifting into higher gear within the consumer's green conscience, hybrid vehicles are still tethered to the gas pump via a fuel-thirsty 100-year-old invention: the internal combustion engine. However, researchers at Michigan State University have built a prototype gasoline engine that requires no transmission, crankshaft, pistons, valves, fuel compression, cooling systems or fluids. Their so-called Wave Disk Generator could greatly improve the efficiency of gas-electric hybrid automobiles and potentially decrease auto emissions up to 90 percent when compared with conventional combustion engines. The engine has a rotor that's equipped with wave-like channels that trap and mix oxygen and fuel as the rotor spins. These central inlets are blocked off, building pressure within the chamber, causing a shock wave that ignites the compressed air and fuel to transmit energy. The Wave Disk Generator uses 60 percent of its fuel for propulsion; standard car engines use just 15 percent.

Solar Room Heater Do you have some south facing windows? (North facing if you are in the Southern Hemisphere), If so you might want to consider some free solar heat. Don't expect this to eliminate all heating costs but it will reduce your expenses. The more windows you can place one of these solar heaters in the more you will see a reduction in your heating costs. The main components of this solar heater design are sheets of heavy-duty foam insulation, one or more sheets of window glass, a tube of "RTV" (bathtub sealant), a box or two of aluminum foil, and a roll of duct tape. Exact sizes and angles to cut will vary, depending on the height of your window from the ground, it's width, and the winter sun angle at your latitude.

I Wanna Deliver A Dolphin... synthetic biology project by Ai Hasegawa This synthetic biology project by designer Ai Hasegawa imagines that a woman could gestate and give birth to a baby from another species, in this case a dolphin, before eating it (+ movie). I Wanna Deliver a Dolphin... was developed by Ai Hasegawa to tackle food shortages and satisfy maternal instincts as the human population burgeons by giving women the option to become surrogates for endangered animals hunted for food. Hasegawa proposes synthesising a placenta that could support an animal in a human womb. "This project approaches the problem of human reproduction in an age of overcrowding, overdevelopment and environmental crisis," Hasegawa said. "With potential food shortages and a population of nearly seven billion people, would a woman consider incubating and giving birth to an endangered species such as a shark, tuna or dolphin?"

Soda Can Solar Heater, v2, Completed I’ve had plenty of people asking me lately what’s going on with Project HMX, and unfortunately, progress on it has stalled for a number of reasons. Chief among them are the other projects that have taken time away or quite literally blocked me from getting to the HMX. Over the weekend, I got one of those projects out of the way. Ever since I built my first soda can solar heater three years ago, I’ve received plenty of input on how to improve the design for better heat output. For that reason, I never hooked up the first one – in fact, I gave it away to a friend – and set about building a bigger, better version, suffering through three cold winters in the garage. I started out by looking for a sliding glass door, which I found locally for free, then took all my measurements from that.

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