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Punk rock

Punk rock
Punk rock (or simply punk) is a rock music genre that developed between 1974 and 1976 in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. Rooted in garage rock and other forms of what is now known as protopunk music, punk rock bands eschewed perceived excesses of mainstream 1970s rock. Punk bands typically use short or fast-paced songs, with hard-edged melodies and singing styles, stripped-down instrumentation, and often political, anti-establishment lyrics. Punk embraces a DIY ethic; many bands self-produced recordings and distributed them through informal channels. Characteristics Philosophy Technical accessibility and a DIY spirit are prized in punk rock. The issue of authenticity is important in the punk subculture—the pejorative term "poseur" is applied to those who associate with punk and adopt its stylistic attributes but are deemed not to share or understand the underlying values and philosophy. Musical and lyrical elements Johnny Rotten and Steve Jones of the Sex Pistols Protopunk

Related:  Youth subculture in Jamaika, UK and continental Europe 60's-80's

Oi! Oi! is a subgenre of punk rock that originated in the United Kingdom in the late 1970s.[1] The music and its associated subculture had the goal of bringing together punks, skinheads and other working-class youth. [2][3] History[edit] The prevalent ideology of the original Oi! Protopunk Proto-punk is the music from the mid-1960s to mid-1970s that influenced punk rock. Typically, proto-punk artists were not themselves considered punk and proto-punk is not a distinct musical genre as it includes a wide range of musical backgrounds and styles. History[edit] Origins[edit] Development in the US[edit]

Punk Rock (play) In the library of a grammar school, seven sixth-formers are preparing for their mock-A Levels and nearing the end of their school lives. There are various sub-plots detailing the various love lines or triangles that emerge through the play. Some critics have criticised Stephens for unoriginality, however. For example, Leo Benedictus, writing for the guardian in 2009, said "The critics spot various possible influences such as The History Boys, Another Country, Lord of the Flies, Elephant, If…, Skins, and The Catcher in the Rye."[10] Punk rock subgenres A number of overlapping punk rock subgenres have developed since the emergence of punk rock (often shortened to punk) in the mid-1970s. Even though punk genres at times are difficult to segregate, they usually show differing characteristics in overall structures, instrumental and vocal styles, and tempo. However, sometimes a particular trait is common in several genres, and thus punk genres are normally grouped by a combination of traits. Anarcho punk[edit] Main article: Anarcho-punk

Ska Etymology[edit] There are different theories about the origins of the word ska. Ernest Ranglin claimed that the term was coined by musicians to refer to the "skat! skat! Garage Rock Garage rock is a raw form of rock and roll that was first popular in the United States and Canada from about 1963 to 1967. Its name derives from the perception that many often rehearsed in a family garage. In the early 1970s, some critics referred to the style as punk rock, the first form of music to bear this description; although it is sometimes called garage punk, protopunk, or 1960s punk, the style has predominantly been referred to as garage rock. Characteristics[edit] The term garage rock comes from the perception that many such performers were young and amateurish, and often rehearsed in a family garage.[1] Some bands were made up of middle-class teenagers from the suburbs, but some were from rural or urban areas, while others were composed of professional musicians in their twenties.[2] History[edit]

Punk Rock at Birmingham Repertory Theatre William Carlisle. The world at his feet. Its weight on his shoulders. Intelligent. Articulate. Timeline of punk rock This is a timeline of punk rock, from its beginnings in the early 1960s to the present time. Bands or albums listed before 1974 are of diverse genres and are retrospectively called "protopunk". Over the years 1974 and 1975, the scene emerged that developed into punk, and it had acquired this name by the start of 1976. Protopunk[edit] 1960s[edit] 1960[edit]

The Clash The Clash's politicised lyrics, musical experimentation, promotion of DIY ethics and rebellious attitude had a far-reaching influence on rock, alternative rock in particular.[2] They became widely referred to as "The Only Band That Matters", originally a promotional slogan introduced by the group's record label, CBS. In January 2003, the band—including original drummer Terry Chimes—were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked the Clash number 28 on their list of the 100 greatest artists of all time.[3] History[edit] Origins: 1974–76[edit] Beat Music Use of the term[edit] The exact origins of the terms Beat music and Merseybeat are uncertain. Beat music seems to have had little to do with the Beat Generation literary movement of the 1950s, and more to do with driving rhythms, which the bands had adopted from their rock and roll, rhythm and blues and soul music influences. As the initial wave of rock and roll declined in the later 1950s "big beat" music, later shortened to "beat", became a live dance alternative to the balladeers like Tommy Steele, Marty Wilde and Cliff Richard who were dominating the charts.[1] Characteristics[edit] "the chord playing of the rhythm guitar was broken up into a series of separate strokes, often one to the bar, with the regular plodding of the bass guitar and crisp drumming behind it.

Simon Stephens Simon Stephens (born Manchester, 6 February 1971) is an award-winning English playwright. Having taught on the Young Writers' Programme at the Royal Court Theatre for many years, he is now an Artistic Associate at the Lyric Hammersmith. His writing is characterised as part of the in-yer-face generation and is widely performed not only in the UK but also throughout Europe, with several of his plays being premiered abroad. Along with Dennis Kelly, he is one of the most performed English-language writers in Germany. Life[edit] Sex Pistols The Sex Pistols were an English punk rock band that formed in London in 1975. They were responsible for initiating the punk movement in the United Kingdom and inspiring many later punk and alternative rock musicians. Although their original career lasted just two-and-a-half years and produced only four singles and one studio album, Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols, they are regarded as one of the most influential acts in the history of popular music.[1][2] In January 1978, at the end of a turbulent tour of the United States, Rotten left the Sex Pistols and announced its break-up. Over the next several months, the three other band members recorded songs for McLaren's film version of the Sex Pistols' story, The Great Rock 'n' Roll Swindle.

Hardcore Punk Hardcore sprouted underground scenes across the United States in the early 1980s particularly in Washington, D.C., California, New York, New Jersey, and Boston—as well as in Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom. Musical characteristics[edit] Politics[edit] Punk fans burning a United States flag in the 1980s. Hardcore dancing[edit] Clothing style[edit]