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5 Critical Mistakes Schools Make With iPads (And How To Correct Them)

5 Critical Mistakes Schools Make With iPads (And How To Correct Them)
Over the last few years K-12 schools and districts across the country have been investing heavily in iPads for classroom use . EdTechTeacher has been leading iPad professional development at many of these schools and we’ve seen firsthand how they approach iPad integration. While we’ve witnessed many effective approaches to incorporating iPads successfully in the classroom, we’re struck by the common mistakes many schools are making with iPads, mistakes that are in some cases crippling the success of these initiatives. We’re sharing these common challenges with you, so your school doesn’t have to make them. 1) Focusing on content apps The most common mistake teachers make with iPads is focusing on subject-specific apps. It simply didn’t occur to him use the VoiceThread app to record his students speaking Latin, or perhaps create a collaborative discussion of Cicero. And we don’t introduce a single subject app. 2) Lack of Teacher Preparation in Classroom Management of iPads It doesn’t.

http://www.edudemic.com/2012/09/5-critical-mistakes-schools-ipads-and-correct-them/

How to make iPad kids film better It’s about time I add another post about my actual teaching practice and how my kids use iPads. One set of iPad skills that interests all the kids and gives them something fun to do is professional film making tricks. This would work well with students from the age of 10 to 16. The lesson is divided in 2 : Sound (Sound effects / Dubbing / voiceovers)Camera work (Steady-cam / multi views per moment) The requirements in general are that at least one student in 4 has the iMovie app or equivalent (There are free movie editing apps but they sometimes limit to 30 seconds export – check the App store). What Sir Ken Got Wrong “We are educating people out of their creativity” Sir Ken Robinson Sir Ken Robinson’s ideas on education are not only impractical; they are undesirable. If you’re interested in education, at some point someone will have sent you a link to a video by Sir Ken Robinson, knighted for services to education in England in 2003.

Neil Gaiman: Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming It’s important for people to tell you what side they are on and why, and whether they might be biased. A declaration of members’ interests, of a sort. So, I am going to be talking to you about reading. Stop trying to figure out if screentime is good for students You may have read the recent New York Times story No Child Left Untableted. Like others before it (Seeing no progress, some schools drop laptops), these stories have the wrong focus. They narrow in on the tool itself, and draw apocalyptic conclusions -- Technology May Be Destroying Children! Say What? 5 Ways to Get Students to Listen Ah, listening, the neglected literacy skill. I know when I was a high school English teacher this was not necessarily a primary focus; I was too busy honing the more measurable literacy skills -- reading, writing, and speaking. But when we think about career and college readiness, listening skills are just as important. This is evidenced by the listening standards found in the Common Core and also the integral role listening plays in collaboration and communication, two of the four Cs of 21st century learning. So how do we help kids become better listeners?

The Difference Between Doing Projects Versus Learning Through Projects The Difference Between Doing Projects Versus Learning Through Projects by Terry Heick We’ve clarified the difference between projects and project-based learning before. Projects are about the product, while project-based learning is about the process.

Brainstorming: More Questions Than Answers There’s been a lot of confusion around brainstorming these days. First, there was the New Yorker article by Jonah Lehrer claiming that brainstorming doesn’t work. Scott Berkun wrote a rebuttal arguing Lehrer’s logic was flawed. Twitter exploded with comments. I’m going to try to make sense of it all.

The dumbest generation? No, Twitter is making kids smarter Part of an occasional series about the way digital culture affects the way we think, learn and live. Sara: Haha there was a weird comercial for computers that had flying sumo wrestlers John: Hahaha saweeeeet I’m still tryin to picture how that works Sarah: Haha yeah so am I this opening ceremony is so weird John: It must be Sarah K: Now there’s little kids doing karate A Very Academic Problem The Teachers vs The Greeks Teachers: Please stop using the word ‘academic’. You don’t know what it means. 5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students My first year teaching a literacy coach came to observe my classroom. After the students left, she commented on how I asked the whole class a question, would wait just a few seconds, and then answer it myself. "It's cute," she added. Um, I don't think she thought it was so cute.

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