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How & Why Teach Kids to Code

How & Why Teach Kids to Code
I want to learn programming, in fact i've wanted to learn it every since i made BASIC show FART in ansi on the screen when in school in early 90s. The problem is, like lots of kids/adults i'm a hands on person. I can't sit reading a book or playing a simple game to learn to program. My brother is good at it, he took about a year to learn C and is making some apps for parents business. But he is a book person. Programming just does not click in my head, its not that I need it explained like a 5 year old, its just my brain does not understand the purpose.

http://lifehacker.com/how-and-why-to-teach-your-kids-to-code-510588878

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Computer Coding Game No Computer Needed Superhero Activity A computer coding game is a really fun way to introduce the basic concept of computer coding to young kids. Even better if you make it a superhero computer coding game! Plus you don’t actually have to have a computer, so it’s a cool tech-free idea. Making Distance Sensors: trigger the Touch Board with proximity Step 8 Spot the difference This code is basically the same as the Touch MP3 code that ships with the Touch Board. The only difference is that the threshold for detecting a touch has been decreased (along with the threshold for detecting a release, for balance). Cargo-Bot – iPad The first game programmed entirely on iPad® Be Logical. Play Cargo-Bot Presenting Cargo-Bot. The first game programmed entirely on iPad using Codea™ Get it for free on the App Store.

ding for kids is as easy as Pi In an effort to make school-based ICT more than a matter of "MS Word, clip art and web research" a central London primary school held a creative activity day at which 240 children aged five to 11 learnt to write computer code. On 28 September, in one of over 20 different creative activities, Pupils at Paddington's St Saviour's Primary School were provided with 30 Rasberry Pi's and Lego WeDo crocodiles, temporarily transforming their story corner into a programming corner. Using MIT's Scratch programming language, the pupils were first taught how to make "Scratch the Cat" move around their computer screens with simple coding commands. Then, with their newfound skills, they were able to program a motion sensing Lego WeDo crocodile to bite down on their finger when placed in the croc's mouth. Co-founder and project director of the day's activities -- the adorably titled "Little House of Fairy Tales" -- was Nick Corston, whose own sons attend the school.

Teaching Kids to Code Every era demands--and rewards--different skills. In different times and different places, we have taught our children to grow vegetables, build a house, forge a sword or blow a delicate glass, bake bread, create a soufflé, write a story or shoot hoops. Now we are teaching them to code. We are teaching them to code, however, not so much as an end in itself but because our world has morphed: so many of the things we once did with elements such as fire and iron, or tools such as pencil and paper, are now wrought in code. We are teaching coding to help our kids craft their future.

Code Maven from Crunchzilla <h2>Code Maven gets teens excited about programming. It is an interactive tutorial where anyone can experiment with learning to code. <p> Code Maven from Crunchzilla uses Javascript. Please enable Javascript if you want to play with Code Maven. Otherwise, Code Maven will not be able to play with you. </p><p></h2> CS Fundamentals for grades K-5 Code.org has developed an elementary school curriculum that allows even the youngest students to explore the limitless world of computing - at no cost for schools. The courses blend online, self-guided and self-paced tutorials with “unplugged” activities that require no computer at all. Each course consists of about 20 lessons that may be implemented as one unit or over the course of a semester. Even kindergarten-aged pre-readers can participate. Professional development workshops near you - at no cost (US only) Code.org is offering high-quality, zero-cost, 1-day workshops to prepare educators and content-area teachers (librarians, tech-ed specialists, etc.) to introduce computer science basics in a format that's fun and accessible to the youngest learners (grades K-5).

How to Pick the Right Programming Language Adron Hall is the lead developer of cloud solutions at New Relic. During the course of every coding project, a software developer must make dozens of decisions. Sometimes this involves solving a problem unique to a particular domain space or a particular architectural issue. Learn to Code, Code to Learn Is it important for all children to learn how to write? After all, very few children grow up to become journalists, novelists, or professional writers. So why should everyone learn to write?

12Blocks Products > 12Blocks 12Blocks is an intuitive, powerful environment for programming popular robots. It’s a visual language that makes programming as simple as drag-n-drop. Learn to Make Interactive Graphics with Updated Getting Started with Processing We started the Processing project in 2001 as a software sketchbook and to teach computer programming fundamentals within a visual context. Instead of printing “Hello World” to the console, people start by drawing a line to the screen. Since then, Processing has evolved many times over into what it is today — a powerful, minimal environment for learning, sketching, and producing professional work, with a dedicated community of contributors who extend the software with the ever-growing list of libraries (extensions).

Code.org CEO Hadi Partovi Podcast Interview with Kara Swisher It’s easy to mistake computer science for programming, and Code.org CEO Hadi Partovi says that even the kids who will never work for Google or Microsoft should be educated in digital literacy. Partovi joined Re/code Executive Editor Kara Swisher on the latest episode of “Re/code Decode,” where he argued that we should start imparting the basics of computer science to kids in elementary school. “We don’t teach biology or chemistry to kids because they’re going to become surgeons or chemists,” Partovi said. “We teach them about photosynthesis and that water is H2O, or how lightbulbs work, just to understand the world around us. You don’t use any of it, but you do on a day-to-day basis use public-key encryption, and the average American has absolutely no idea what that is.”

Girls Who Code joins forces with Twitter, Google, eBay It's no secret that there's a lack of women in the tech industry. But the former deputy public advocate of New York City, Reshma Saujani, wants to do something about it. Saujani launched a new initiative called Girls Who Code this month backed by tech heavyweights Twitter, eBay, Google, and General Electric. The program aims to encourage high school girls to study computer science and engineering. "Together with leading educators, engineers, and entrepreneurs, Girls Who Code has developed a new model for computer science education, pairing intensive instruction in robotics, web design, and mobile development with high-touch mentorship led by the industry's top female developers and entrepreneurs," the Girls Who Code Web site reads. According to Saujani, only 3.6 percent of Fortune 500 companies are women-led and less than 10 percent of venture capital-backed companies have female founders.

How to Teach Computing: An Introduction to Concepts, Tools and Resources for Secondary Teachers "Coding is like the new literacy!" Neelie Kroes, Vice President of the European Commission. Annoyed of students being distracted by their mobile phones?

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