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Mr Corbett's maths page

Mr Corbett's maths page

http://corbettmaths.com/

Related:  MathematicsTeaching MathsMaths Blogs

Math The Mathematics area of study is designed to build a strong foundation in mathematical understanding and procedural skills, as well as to prepare students to meet the standards for 21st Century critical thinking and problem solving. The Mathematics curriculum includes the areas of ratios and proportional relationships, the number system, expressions and equations, geometry, and statistics and probability. The courses are aligned with the Common Core State Standards and designed to cover the equivalent of a year-long, traditional school curriculum. The main goals of the Common Core State Standards are to establish the knowledge and skills necessary for college and career readiness among high school graduates, and to continually develop these skill sets at each grade level.

Feature: What is the Mastery Model of Teaching Maths? Education minister Elizabeth Truss explained some of the background to the government’s current proposals for teaching maths in a recent speech. This article was originally published on The Conversation. By Steve Chinn, University of Derby She mentioned the term “mastery” and enthusiastically welcomed Singapore Maths, a series of textbooks following the “mastery model” by Marshall Cavendish Education, that will be published in the UK from 2015 by Oxford University Press. One might be tempted to assume Singapore Maths might have something to do with the Ministry of Education in Singapore.

Mr Mathematics Blog Teaching the calculation of\relationships between interior and exterior angles of polygons has been a favourite topic of mine since I became a teacher. I enjoy the range of interconnected relationships just waiting to be discovered and explained, once the sum of exterior angles is understood. For years I had sought how to best teach this so the students too could appreciate such geometrical beauty. My enthusiasm for this topic stemmed from the sense of achievement that came with discovering these interconnected relationships for myself. How can we meet the needs of all pupils without differentiation of lesson content? How can we record progress without levels? Thoughts on topical issues of mathematics education from the NCETM’s Director, Charlie Stripp I believe that if we are to adopt a teaching for mastery approach to maths teaching, consistent with the new National Curriculum, we must answer these questions. Many primary teachers have asked my NCETM colleagues and me these questions, and this blog explains our current thinking.

Questimate! - the estimation game where *you* make the questions How many giraffes would be as tall as Mt. Everest? How fast is the world’s fastest train? How many jelly beans would fill up a soccer ball? In what year was the cell phone invented? Why Do Buses Come in Threes? Some people have a fear of mathematics, possibly because of the abstract teaching methods that were in use in my schooldays. I get the impression that things have changed somewhat since then, but in any case this book provides an easy to understand some of the things that happen in everyday life. The first chapter begins with numbers that occur frequently in plants, explaining why four-leafed clovers are rare. Depending on the species, plants tend to have three leaves like clovers, or five leaves like buttercups, pansies and primroses, rather than four.

Secondary Maths Teaching Inspiration If I had £1 for every time I heard ‘I don’t get it!’, I could probably buy a new (modestly sized) car. That phrase is banned in my classroom. What does ‘get’ mean? What is ‘it’? 21 Common Core-Aligned Math Apps for High School Students From edshelf by edshelf: Reviews & recommendations of tools for education If your high school has adopted Common Core Standards and provides students with iPads (either 1:1 or via an iPad cart), you will need to find apps that map to these standards. And if you teach math, you are in luck. Math and engineering teacher Chris Beyerle from South Carolina curates this collection of math apps. These map to the eight Standards for Mathematical Practice. That’s CCSS.Math.Practice.MP1 to CCSS.Math.Practice.MP8.

Practical tips for a (newly) qualified maths teacher Student teachers, NQTs and experienced teachers have one thing in common - they haven't got it all figured out yet. I certainly haven't - every year I try to use my time more effectively and teach maths more effectively. Here's my top ten tips for newbies. 1. Plans At my school we used to have 4.5 periods a week to teach A level. That was reduced to 4 periods a week due to budget cuts - a loss of around 15 teaching hours. Musings of a mathematical magpie If you’ve had a look through this blog before, you might have read the “about me” section at the side where I explain that I did a history degree before going on to become a maths teacher. This information mildly interests some people, worries others, and sends a select bunch into a heightened state of moral outrage. This last group – the righteously indignant - are of course the most entertaining, and I’ve learned to develop a thick skin when they air their short-sighted opinions. Upon hearing the news that I had a history degree, one man abruptly stopped the perfectly pleasant conversation we were having and started spluttering “I wouldn’t let you anywhere near children” before walking off. Another person reacted by saying that I could never be taken seriously as a professional and surely I should be teaching primary school children. So I’m taking the opportunity to answer these two questions about myself.

Mathalicious The World Is an Interesting Place. Math Class Should Be, Too. At Mathalicious, we think the world is an interesting place full of interesting questions. Do people with small feet pay too much for shoes? Do taller Olympic sprinters have an unfair advantage? Loving your subject “To explain something to someone is first of all to show him he cannot understand it by himself.”Jacques Ranciere The previous post in this series looked at developing a love of Mathematics itself, and how an appreciation of the history and impact of Mathematics makes a difference to your team’s practice in the classroom. This time around, I’ll be talking about how an appreciation of pedagogy, the philosophy of Mathematics education and what engaging students in the subject really means (spoiler: it doesn’t mean ‘fun’ tasks for their own sake). So let’s begin.

More than a maths teacher In his book Purple Cow: Transform Your Business by Being Remarkable, Seth Godin, a marketing expert, argues that advertising is less effective than it used to be because we are bombarded by adverts – which we tend to ignore. His solution is to have an amazing product – a purple cow in a field of black and white cows, so that it stands out and really captures the imagination. In his presentation at TM Bett 14, Julian Wood suggested that something similar could be done in our classrooms. That got me thinking. Which of my lessons stand out and grab the students attention? Here are some activities that fit that description: seven purple cows, some maths activities with a bit of wow.

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