background preloader

First-ever high-resolution images of a molecule as it breaks and reforms chemical bonds

When Felix Fischer of the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) set out to develop nanostructures made of graphene using a new, controlled approach to chemical reactions, the first result was a surprise: spectacular images of individual carbon atoms and the bonds between them. "We weren't thinking about making beautiful images; the reactions themselves were the goal," says Fischer, a staff scientist in Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division (MSD) and a professor of chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley. "But to really see what was happening at the single-atom level we had to use a uniquely sensitive atomic force microscope in Michael Crommie's laboratory." Crommie is an MSD scientist and a professor of physics at UC Berkeley. What the microscope showed the researchers, says Fischer, "was amazing." The researchers report their results in the June 7, 2013 edition of the journal Science , available in advance on Science Express .

http://phys.org/news/2013-05-first-ever-high-resolution-images-molecule-reforms.html

Related:  Fisica delle particelleMolecule PicturesChemistry

Amazingly, Actual Molecules Look Just Like High School Textbook Drawings Sciencexpress Those little hexagons you studied in high-school chemistry -- they are real things! Real, tiny, tiny things that make up the world around us, and that, with the help of an "atomic finger," we can actually see. Using a technique called noncontact atomic force microscopy, physicists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have managed to image a single molecule immediately before and after a complex organic reaction. The molecules are about a billionth of a meter wide. The mysterious case of the missing noble gas D. Waldorf/Getty Who took the xenon? Charge your mobile phone with formic acid? May 27, 2013 — Surprisingly the answer is yes. With the technology of today it is possible to use environmental friendly formic acid in fuel cell powering your mobile phone or laptop. Physicist Florian Nitze, Umeå University in Sweden, has in his thesis developed new catalysts to improve the capacity of these fuel cells. Fuel cells are different from batteries in that they require a constant source of fuel and oxygen to run.

Two collider research teams find evidence of new particle Zc(3900) (Phys.org) —Two research teams working independently at two different particle accelerators have found evidence of what appears to be a four-quark particle that has come to be called Zc(3900). Both teams are made up of a large number of researchers affiliated with institutions from around the world and both have published their findings in separate papers in the journal Physical Review Letters. The discovery of what appears to be a new particle has come about at the two sites (the Belle and BESIII experiments in Japan and China, respectively) as a result of research into Y(4260), a particle discovered in 2005.

Atom Inside Photographed - science Last updated 10:48 27/05/2013 ANETA STODOLNA/ FOM Institute Four-by-four-millimetre images showing the bull's eye-like rings of electron wave functions inside hydrogen atoms. Redder areas reflect a higher density of electrons than bluer areas. The two images represent hydrogen atoms that had been fired on by differently colored lasers, resulting in slightly different quantum wave functions. First-ever high-resolution images of a molecule as it breaks and reforms chemical bonds May 30, Nanotechnology/Nanophysics Almost as clearly as a textbook diagram, this image made by a noncontact atomic force microscope reveals the positions of individual atoms and bonds, in a molecule having 26 carbon atoms and 14 hydrogen atoms structured as three connected benzene rings. Credit: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California at Berkeley When Felix Fischer of the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) set out to develop nanostructures made of graphene using a new, controlled approach to chemical reactions, the first result was a surprise: spectacular images of individual carbon atoms and the bonds between them. "We weren't thinking about making beautiful images; the reactions themselves were the goal," says Fischer, a staff scientist in Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division (MSD) and a professor of chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley.

Infinite-capacity wireless vortex beams carry 2.5 terabits per second American and Israeli researchers have used twisted vortex beams to transmit data at 2.5 terabits per second. As far as we can discern, this is the fastest wireless network ever created — by some margin. This technique is likely to be used in the next few years to vastly increase the throughput of both wireless and fiber-optic networks. These twisted signals use orbital angular momentum (OAM) to cram much more data into a single stream. In current state-of-the-art transmission protocols (WiFi, LTE, COFDM), we only modulate the spin angular momentum (SAM) of radio waves, not the OAM. If you picture the Earth, SAM is our planet spinning on its axis, while OAM is our movement around the Sun. icists aim to make transition to quantum world visible Theoretical physicist Frank Wilhelm-Mauch and his research team at Saarland University have developed a mathematical model for a type of microscopic test lab that could provide new and deeper insight into the world of quantum particles. The new test system will enable the simultaneous study of one hundred light quanta (photons) and their complex quantum mechanical relationships ("quantum entanglement") – a far greater number than was previously possible. The researchers hope to gain new insights that will be of relevance to the development of quantum computers. They are the first group worldwide to undertake such studies using a so-called "metamaterial", a specially constructed lattice of nanostructures that is able to refract light more strongly than existing natural materials.

Related: