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Blackwater's Black Ops & Monsanto

Blackwater's Black Ops & Monsanto
Internal documents reveal the firm's clandestine work for multinationals and governments. Over the past several years, entities closely linked to the private security firm Blackwater have provided intelligence, training and security services to US and foreign governments as well as several multinational corporations, including Monsanto, Chevron, the Walt Disney Company, Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines and banking giants Deutsche Bank and Barclays, according to documents obtained by The Nation . Blackwater's work for corporations and government agencies was contracted using two companies owned by Blackwater's owner and founder, Erik Prince: Total Intelligence Solutions and the Terrorism Research Center (TRC). Prince is listed as the chairman of both companies in internal company documents, which show how the web of companies functions as a highly coordinated operation. About the Author Jeremy Scahill Also by the Author What relationship Prado's CCG has with the CIA is not known.

http://www.thenation.com/article/154739/blackwaters-black-ops#

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Terrorism Research Center The Current TRC Logo The Terrorism Research Center (TRC) is non-profit think tank focused on investigating and researching global terrorism issues through multi-disciplinary collaboration amongst a group of international experts. Terrorism Research Center (1996 to 2012)[edit] The Terrorism Research Center (TRC) was founded in 1996 by Matthew Devost, Brian Houghton, and Neal Pollard to establish an organization with a specific focus on terrorism and emerging international security issues like information warfare. It was purchased by Blackwater's Erik Prince in 2007. Over the course of 14 years, the TRC conducted research, analysis, and training on variety of counterterrorism and homeland security issues.

Nadhmi Auchi From WikiLeaks Nadhmi Auchi (Arabic: نظمي أوجي‎) is a British resident Iraqi billionaire and former Ba'ath party member who left Iraq in the early 1980s. He is the founder and chairman of the Luxembourg registered General Mediterranean Holding (GMH SA), a conglomerate of 120 companies worldwide. Nadhmi Auchi, seen here with the Governor of Illinois, Rob Blagojevich (right) in 2004 at, according to Auchi's website GMHSA.com, a Chicago dinner in Auchi's honor

Blackwater 3.0: Rebranded 'Academi' Wants Back in Iraq So much for naming your mercenary company after an obscure element from the periodic table. Say goodbye to Xe. The company formerly known as Blackwater — the world’s most infamous private security corporation — has jettisoned the name it chose in its 2009 rebrand. Now the “security solutions provider” wants to wash away the taint of the 2007 Nisour Square shootings by adopting the new name “Academi.” But the company is changing its name — not its core business. And it even wants back into the country where it ran its brand through the mud: Iraq. Hate Map The Geography of Hate is part of a larger project by Dr. Monica Stephens of Humboldt State University (HSU) identifying the geographic origins of online hate speech. Undergraduate students Amelia Egle, Matthew Eiben and Miles Ross, worked to produce the data and this map as part of Dr. Stephens' Advanced Cartography course at Humboldt State University. The data behind this map is based on every geocoded tweet in the United States from June 2012 - April 2013 containing one of the 'hate words'.

New Blackwater Iraq Scandal: Guns, Silencers and Dog Food A federal grand jury in North Carolina is investigating allegations the controversial private security firm Blackwater illegally shipped assault weapons and silencers to Iraq, hidden in large sacks of dog food, ABCNews.com has learned. Under State Department rules, Blackwater is prohibited from using certain assault weapons and silencers in Iraq because they are considered "offensive" weapons inappropriate for Blackwater's role as a private security firm protecting US diplomatic missions. "The only reason you need a silencer is if you want to assassinate someone," said former CIA intelligence officer John Kiriakou, an ABC News consultant.

PRISM (surveillance program) PRISM logo used in the slides PRISM is a clandestine mass electronic surveillance data mining program launched in 2007 by the National Security Agency (NSA), with participation from an unknown date by the British equivalent agency, GCHQ.[1][2][3] PRISM is a government code name for a data-collection effort known officially by the SIGAD US-984XN.[4][5] The Prism program collects stored Internet communications based on demands made to Internet companies such as Google Inc. under Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act of 2008 to turn over any data that match court-approved search terms.[6] The NSA can use these Prism requests to target communications that were encrypted when they traveled across the Internet backbone, to focus on stored data that telecommunication filtering systems discarded earlier,[7][8] and to get data that is easier to handle, among other things.[9] Slide showing that much of the world's communications flow through the U.S.

It’s Incredibly Rare For A Grand Jury To Do What Ferguson’s Just Did A St. Louis County grand jury on Monday decided not to indict Ferguson, Missouri, police officer Darren Wilson in the August killing of teenager Michael Brown. The decision wasn’t a surprise — leaks from the grand jury had led most observers to conclude an indictment was unlikely — but it was unusual. Grand juries nearly always decide to indict. Or at least, they nearly always do so in cases that don’t involve police officers. Former New York state Chief Judge Sol Wachtler famously remarked that a prosecutor could persuade a grand jury to “indict a ham sandwich.” Noam Chomsky Resources "As long as the Internet was under control of the Pentagon, it was free. People could use it freely [for] information sharing. That remained true when it stayed within the state sector of the National Science Foundation. As late as about 1994, people like say, Bill Gates, had no interest in the Internet. He wouldn't even go to conferences about it, because he didn't see a way to make a profit from it.

News Republic Show captions Showing image 1 of 1 Huffington Post Tuesday, February 11, 2014 8:48 AM GMT WASHINGTON -- Rep.

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