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Seven stages of writing assignments

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mshesso:Grammar AA = Avoid Anthropomorphism Do not assign uniquely human qualities to inanimate objects. For instance, results do not think and the literature does not believe. Inanimate objects or concepts can perform actions, such as supporting theories, demonstrating effects, and so forth, but they cannot engage in strictly human activities such as thinking and believing. See Section 3.09 (Precision and Clarity - Attribution), p. 69 of the APA Publication Manual for further details. Return to the Table of Contents. AWO = Awkward Word Order Clear writing depends on a logical word order; placing words in an awkward order can obscure the meaning entirely or confuse the reader. , may have been used to suggest an alternative word order. The APA Publication Manual does not provide further details. BL = Biased Language It is very important to make sure that our language is unbiased and to avoid subtle forms of unintential bias. Describe at the appropriate level of specificity. Be sensitive to labels. See also S/H.

An Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments A reader recently wrote in asking if I could share a bit about the process of putting the book together and talk about how the project started. Certainly. I go on two solitary walks every day. There is a small park off the Embarcadero that is tucked away in a quiet spot. It was on a day in October of last year when, during one of those quiet moments on that bench, I recalled my college years and how outspoken I happened to be during them, an observation only made interesting by the fact that I have since turned into the quietest of beings. A realization that coincided with that nostalgic whiff was that a sizable amount of the discourse nowadays continues to be plagued with bad reasoning. Hence, the idea that finally shook me into soberness was one that had been fermenting for a while. Once I had a draft version of the book ready, I sent it to one of my life-long idols, Marvin Minsky, co-founder of the MIT Artificial Intelligence Lab and author of The Society of Mind.

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Fiction University STANDARD OUTLINE FOR  RESEARCH P Not only will this outline help you write, it will help you skim college-level reading. Note: In a group project, each individual’s paper—like chapters-- may follow IV-VII. Later, write I, II, III &, VII-VIII to frame all of the individual sections coherently. This is a guideline, not a Bible!!! Content determines format; write to affect an audience. caster09 I. II. III. IV. V. Exploratory: Differences exist between Mt. Argument: Because of the implications of Mt. VI. · compare/contrast (cultures, genders, nations, ethnicities, etc. produce multiple viewpts. to compare) · cause/effect (or correlation) · problem/solution VII. VIII. IX. · It is hard to do all this credibly in less than 10 pages + References + Abstract + Title Page. · You may choose to use subtitles for your sections. · Remember: if what you are saying is complex and would be more easily understood in a graph or other visual, include one!!! · Be very careful with your tone and analyze tone in others' writing.

Commonly misspelled English words Commonly misspelled English words[1] (UK: misspelt words) are words that are often unintentionally misspelled in general writing. A selected list of common words is presented below, under Documented list of common misspellings. Although the word common is subjective depending on the situation, the focus is on general writing, rather than in a specific field. Accepted spellings also vary by country or region, with some rejecting the American or British variants as incorrect for the region.[1][2][3] Within a particular field of study, such as computer graphics, other words might be more common for misspelling, such as "pixel" misspelled as "pixle" (or variants "cesium" and "caesium"). Unlimited misspellings[edit] Documented list of common misspellings[edit] The following list, of about 350 words, is based on documented lists[4][10] of the top 100, 200, or 400[3] most commonly misspelled words in all variants of the English language, rather than listing every conceivable misspelled word.

Methods of communication - Getting the message across - the importance of good communications - HMRC | HMRC case studies and information The best communication methods succeed in putting across the right message in a clear, unambiguous way that gets noticed by the target audience, whilst also saving on time and cost. Good communicators succeed in choosing the best medium of communication for the particular purpose in mind. For external communications, the Inland Revenue typically uses: Written communications dispatched by mail e.g. statements detailing tax liabilities and payment schedules. The Inland Revenue uses similar methods for internal communications e.g. Written communications - internal memos, staff magazines, notices or posters on staff notice boards.Oral communications - phone conversations between employees.Face-to-face - team briefings, meetings and presentations.Online - internal e-mails and intranet. Face-to-face conversations and oral communications make possible more detailed discussions to clarify issues.

Creative Writing Help & Inspiration “Can you recommend a good book on writing?” I am often asked to recommend a ‘good book on writing’. A simple enough question, but one that is surprisingly hard to answer. In my attempts to do so, I feel a bit like a sommelier, responding to the question with a few of my own: Are you having the fish or the lamb? Do you tend to like full-bodied reds? That is, it’s hard to recommend a book without knowing what sort of writing project you are doing and what sort of support you are likely to perceive as valuable. This list includes some of the books that I find helpful, allowing you to see what might be beneficial to you. Needless to say, some of you will gravitate more naturally to online resources for writing. Note: I’ve included U of T library links for those of you who are local. Jacques Barzun, Simple and Direct: A Rhetoric for Writers, Fourth Edition (New York: Quill, 2001). Howard S. Wayne C. Claire Kehrwald Cook, Line by Line: How to Edit Your Own Writing (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1985). Patricia T. John M. Joseph M.

15 Common College Grammar and Spelling Mistakes As midterms approach, many students are preparing for their first essays of the semester. By college, you should be able to write an effective essay, but we often make the same grammatical and spelling mistakes over and over again. I have no doubt you can use two/too/to and there/they’re/their correctly by now, but here are some more advanced common grammatical and spelling errors that make you look silly, both in your writing and speaking. Note: All of these definitions are my re-wordings of dictionaries and grammars. Then/Than: Although a common error in writing, this is a very grammar problem to solve. As midterms approach, many students are preparing for their first essays of the semester. Note: All of these definitions are my re-wordings of dictionaries and grammars. Then/Than: Although a common error in writing, this is a very grammar problem to solve.

Daily Rituals: A Guided Tour of Writers’ and Artists’ Creative Habits by Maria Popova Hemingway wrote standing, Nabokov on index cards, Twain while puffing cigars, and Sitwell in an open coffin. “We are spinning our own fates, good or evil, and never to be undone,” the William James’s famous words on habit echo. “Every smallest stroke of virtue or of vice leaves its never so little scar.” Given this omnibus of the daily routines of famous writers was not only one of my favorite articles to research but also the most-read and -shared one in the entire history of Brain Pickings, imagine my delight at the release of Daily Rituals: How Artists Work (public library) by Mason Currey, based on his blog of the same title. The notion that if only we could replicate the routines of great minds, we’d be able to reverse-engineer their genius is, of course, an absurd one — yet an alluring one nonetheless. Mark Twain — master of epistolary snark, unsuspected poet, cheeky adviser of little girls — followed a simple but rigorous routine: Photograph courtesy BBC

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