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World Dream Bank: PLANETOCOPIA

World Dream Bank: PLANETOCOPIA
World Dream Bank home - add a dream - newest - art gallery - sampler - dreams by title, subject, author, date, places, names by Chris Wayan, 2002-2010 Planetocopia is a group of model worlds supporting intelligent life. They fall into four series: Tilt! (Earth with different poles), Futures (set 1000 years from now), the Biosphere Variations (diverse experiments in planetology), and Caprices (whimsically altered Earths). Behind-the-scenes pages include the new Planetocopia interview, Carpentry Tips for World-Builders (how I make 'em), The Heart Hath Its Reasons (why I make 'em), Tech Corner (a chart comparing 'em), World-Builders (influences: others who make 'em). Set 1: TILT! Alternate Earths that evolved with our geography, only tilted. Set 2: Futures Three worlds on the same day 1000 years from now--all of them profoundly transformed: Set 3: The Biosphere Variations Worlds so unEarthlike that most exobiologists would write them off... prematurely. Biosphere Variations under construction:

http://www.worlddreambank.org/P/PLANETS.HTM

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Extrasolar Planets Are, Almost, Everywhere This article was originally published on The Conversation. The publication contributed this article to Space.com's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights. When Captain Cook sailed into Botany Bay in 1770, we did not know how many planets were in our solar system. We only knew about Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. Based on the orbits of these planets, 18th century European astronomers invented what is now called the Titius-Bode relation. It’s a simple empirical relation that describes the relative distances between the planets and the sun. 10 Steps to Creating Realistic Fantasy Animals by Ashley Lange Why do writers write? Because it isn't there. - Thomas Berger Arguably, the two most challenging aspects for fantasy/science fiction writers to conquer are originality and believability.

A Map of San Francisco, After a Catastrophic Rise in Sea Levels Far in the future, San Francisco's Divisadero Street is a cruise-ship harbor, taco trucks have become taco boats, and the Mission District is a beloved site for scuba diving. That's the waterlogged vision of cartographer Brian Stokle and Bay Area blog Burrito Justice, who've made a fantasy map of the city post-200 feet of sea-level rise. The map, though it's been around a while, is getting its wonky due in a new urban-cartography exhibit at local urban-planning think tank SPUR. (The show runs until February 6.) Regarding its inspiration, the entity behind Burrito Justice says via Twitter: "Brian made a topo map, I was joking around, wanted to know when Potrero & Bernal became islands. 200 feet is where things got interesting." There's a fake NIMBY group, the Submerged Historic San Francisco Preservation Association, that rails against high-rise development with the battle cry, "Old San Francisco is still alive in our hearts and minds, even if only the tops of the buildings can be seen!

A Multitude of Settings : A Typology of RPG Gameworlds To think that tens of millions of individuals over the world in the past thirty-five or so years have participated in improvised story telling in the fictional settings created by the roleplaying game hobby is, quite frankly, quite staggering and certainly one that will receive some small mention in cultural history of our time in the future. But how do these various published worlds stack up? There has been, by now, more than sufficient time to generate quite a variety of styles and thematic considerations which can be reviewed with the objective to tell whether there is any particular elements which provide lasting aid in the establishment of such settings. The overall orientation is, as always, constantly seeking improvement and further improvement for the RPG industry. As an attempt to derive a typology, a simple classification is used which illustrates the key features of a multitude of settings.

List of forms of government Government of any kind currently affects every human activity in many important ways. For this reason, political scientists generally argue that government should not be studied by itself; but should be studied along with anthropology, economics, history, philosophy, science, and sociology. Political science Etymology From Middle English government,[citation needed] from Old French government[citation needed] (French gouvernement), from Latin gubernatio ("management, government"). Government is a compound formed from the Ancient Greek κυβερνάω (kubernaō, "I steer, drive, guide, pilot") and the Latin -mente, ablative singular of mēns ("mind").

Themes & Things To Keep In Mind When Writing Fantasy Stories and Adventures » Daily Encounter This list is far from complete. It’s not even trying to be complete. It knows better than that. It just wants to be helpful and provide some inspiration here and there; you know, offer little suggestions that might lead to bigger ideas. A Sprawling Videogame City Filled With Buildings Made by Generative Algorithms Game designer Cedric Kerr developed an architectural engine that allows for the rapid creation of buildings to fill out virtual landscapes. Cedric Kerr Kerr only needs to draw an outline of a building and then can stretch it in any dimension while an algorithm populates the form with doors, windows, and other architectural details.

The Sliding Scale of Technology And Magic - Crit Confirm If you want to start a massive brawl all you have to do is find a room full of Pathfinder players and say the magical phrase, “I think the gunslinger class is really great!” Within seconds battle lines will be drawn and players will be hurling insults, promptly followed by game-books and chairs. One side will be firmly on the side of including Renaissance-era technology (and possibly sci-fi technology) that is supported in the game, and the other side will be digging “not in my fantasy game” trenches. Why do we do this?

Magical World Builder By, Stephanie Cottrell Bryant The Magical World Builder's Guide is a tool for creating a fantasy universe. Although there are several good guidebooks to creating a science fiction world, few deal with the quintessential elements of a fantasy realm. Dyson's Dodecahedron 3 Votes The Dyson MegaDelve is a dungeon map that I started in late 2014 and finished in early 2015. It started as a “small” megadungeon and gradually evolved into a 30-map monstrosity. Node Map (click to enlarge) That’s the full list of the maps involved and how they connect. Here’s the maps in question:

Göbekli Tepe By Charles C. Mann Photograph by Vincent J. Creating Fantasy Nations (World Building II) By this point you've got your map and the basics for one of your ideas. It's time to put people on these continents. If you haven't already, ask yourself the basics about each culture you want to generate. Taken from World Building I, those are: What are the needs of this culture? 2015 Dodecahedron Cartographic Review - ZERObarrier The 2015 Dodecahedron Cartographic Review is an 88-page curated collection of most of the maps and descriptions thereof that appeared on Dyson's Dodecahedron throughout 2015. Designed to be a letter-sized spiral bound book, this digital edition also includes a second version of the book where many of the maps have been resized (larger) to better fit the page once all the text has been removed. Unlike the maps of Dyson's Delves I and Dyson's Delves II, the maps I drew for the Dodecahedron in 2015 were predominantly drawn on letter-sized paper, so a different format of map book was needed for this review of the year's cartography. The PDF edition of these maps is provided as a convenience for readers of the blog and fans of RPG cartography and contains no exclusive content - everything in this PDF can be hunted down on the Dyson's Dodecahedron blog and downloaded at high resolution.

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