background preloader

How Does Writing Affect Your Brain?

How Does Writing Affect Your Brain?
Most of us write a little something everyday. It might be a grocery list, a poem, or a write-up on the infographic of the day. As we go through this daily ritual, however, we are probably not aware of the effects writing has on our brains. According to today’s infographic, writing can serve as a calming, meditative tool. Stream of conscious writing exercises, in particular, have been identified as helpful stress coping methods. It should also be noted that writing can hold a powerful influence over its readers. So, whether you’re trying to de-stress, or improve your writing, check out the infographic below for some helpful insight into the goings-on of your brain. Share This Infographic Get Free Infographics Delivered to your Inbox

Finding your voice - making your writing sound like YOU Finding your voice by Christopher Meeks Developing a voice in your writing is a notion that passes over me every now and then like the "thung" sound of an error message on my computer. "I should develop a voice," I think. To some people, the image of "voice" may be akin to a rotund person belting something out in Italian in front of a lot of penguin-suited people paying big bucks waiting for the crystal to shatter. Or, if that metaphor's a bit too extreme, think of "voice" as simply like your own voice. A voice on the Web: Strive to create a "text" voice that is as distinctive as your speaking voice.We can't all be Hemingway: Don't try to write like someone else; find your own voice and don't try to change your demeanor.Write like you talk: It really can be that simple.Let your passion be your guide: Follow the urge; follow the idea.Let me entertain you: All writing, even the most serious, is a form of entertainment. I can recognize voice in other people's work. How do we do that? Boom.

How Writing Things Down Can Change Your Life What do you write down? For most of us, writing consists of emails, task lists, and perhaps the odd work project. However, making time to write down certain things, such as our daily experiences, our goals, and our mental clutter can change the way we live our lives. Here are six different ways that writing things down can change your life, and what you can do to get the most out of each. 1. You can clear your mind by writing things down in two different ways. David Allen, productivity speaker and author of Getting Things Done, recommends doing what he calls a “core dump”. You can also use a technique called “morning pages”, which was pioneered by Julia Cameron, author of The Artist’s Way. 2. Writing down what’s on our mind is a great way to work through inner conflict or process your feelings around a particular situation. 3. If you keep a journal and regularly write down your thoughts and feelings, you’ll soon have a record of your experiences that you might otherwise have forgotten. 4.

5 unconventional ways to become a better writer (hint, it's about being a better reader) 1.3K Flares Filament.io 1.3K Flares × Can I be blunt on this subject? If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that. – Stephen King Even if you’re not a ‘writer’ per se, writing can be highly beneficial. It can be helpful for a number of things: Generally, there are two things that writers recommend to others who want to improve: more writing, and reading. Reading—the good and the bad—inspires you. Since reading is something we learn to do when we first start school, it’s easy to think we’ve got it sorted out and we don’t need to work on this skill anymore. Knowing how to read and not reading books is like owning skis and not skiing, owning a board and never riding a wave, or, well, having your favorite sandwich in your hand and not eating it. So let’s take a look at five unconventional ways to become better writers by changing the way we read. 1. Robert Estreitinho is a fan of this method: 2. Reading is meant to be a fun activity. 3. 4. 5.

6 Of The Best Pieces of Advice From Successful Writers 2.4K Flares Filament.io 2.4K Flares × I’ve been reading some advice from successful writers lately and exploring what their routines are like to see what I can learn about Here are six of the most common pieces of advice I came across that have helped me a lot improving my writing here at Buffer. It also features actionable tips for you on how to implement them in your own writing. 1. I write because it comes out — and then to get paid for it afterwards? Unlike Charles Bukowski, writing well doesn’t come so easily for a lot of us (including me). The pure effort of writing is hard enough, but coupled with the pain of putting your work out into the world and letting others judge it, this can be enough to stop you from getting started at all. The trick to overcoming this isn’t easy, but it’s surprisingly effective: give yourself permission to write badly, and just start. Anne Lamott, author of Bird by Bird wrote an excellent essay on why writers must start with horrible drafts: 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Online Etymology Dictionary WebElements Periodic Table of the Elements Chemistry News Study Paves the Way for New Photosensitive Materials Apr. 22, 2021 — Scientists are investigating the molecular dynamics of titania clusters. Such research is a basic step toward the development of more efficient ... Silver Ions Hurry Up, Then Wait as They Disperse Apr. 22, 2021 — Chemists quantify the release mechanism of silver ions from gold-silver nanoparticle alloys. The nanoparticles are being studied for use as catalyst in hydrogen evolution and other ... Understanding Interfaces of Hybrid Materials With Machine Learning Apr. 19, 2021 — Using machine learning methods, researchers can predict the structure formation of functionalized molecules at the interfaces of hybrid materials. Mapping Performance Variations to See How Lithium-Metal Batteries Fail Apr. 19, 2021 — Scientists have identified the primary cause of failure in a state-of-the-art lithium-metal battery, of interest for long-range electric vehicles: electrolyte ... Ultra-Fast Photo-Exfoliation

All Nobel Prizes in Chemistry The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2002 "for the development of methods for identification and structure analyses of biological macromolecules" John B. Fenn and Koichi Tanaka "for their development of soft desorption ionisation methods for mass spectrometric analyses of biological macromolecules" Kurt Wüthrich "for his development of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for determining the three-dimensional structure of biological macromolecules in solution" The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1993 "for contributions to the developments of methods within DNA-based chemistry" Kary B. "for his invention of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method" Michael Smith "for his fundamental contributions to the establishment of oligonucleotide-based, site-directed mutagenesis and its development for protein studies" The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1942 No Nobel Prize was awarded this year. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1941 The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1940 The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1933 Alfred Werner Victor Grignard

Related: