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100 Words Every Expert Author Should Know

100 Words Every Expert Author Should Know
Please note: Read this post first. We clarified our position. A Great Vocabulary Makes Compelling Reading! The EzineArticles Editors have compiled a list of 100 words they recommend every Expert Author should know to be more concise, descriptive, and engaging. Show you’re a master of the English language by spicing up your writing with the following words and feel free to share this graphic. Simply click on the graphic below to view in a new window and then click the image or select Ctrl (on your keyboard) and then + or – to zoom in or out. By no means is this an exhaustive list. Want to share this image?

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The Rhetorical Triangle - Communication Skills from MindTools Making Your Writing Credible, Appealing, and Logical © iStockphoto/alexsl Does your heart sink a little when you are asked to prepare a written document or present information to an audience? 45 ways to avoid using the word 'very' Three Telling Quotes About ‘Very’ Substitute ‘damn’ every time you’re inclined to write ‘very;’ your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be. ~Mark Twain‘Very’ is the most useless word in the English language and can always come out. More than useless, it is treacherous because it invariably weakens what it is intended to strengthen. ~Florence KingSo avoid using the word ‘very’ because it’s lazy. A man is not very tired, he is exhausted.

Animal Adjectives Animal Adjectives While there are other forms of adjectives for animals, by far the greater majority of such words end in -ine; thus the following list deals excusively with this type. The -ine suffix comes from the Latin -inus and forms terms meaning 'of or relating to' or 'of the nature of'. Some of these words are sometimes even used in reference to people: how often have you heard of a woman moving with feline grace, for instance? Note that some animals share the same adjective, for example, badgers, ermines, ferrets, etc. are all musteline, while other animals can be descibed by more than one adjective. Characteristics of A Poem.. One of the most definable characteristics of the poetry is economy of language. Poets are miserly and unrelentingly critical in the way they dole out words to a page. Carefully selecting words for conciseness and clarity is standard, even for writers of prose, but poets go well beyond this, considering a word’s emotive qualities, its musical value, its spacing, and yes, even its spacial relationship to the page.The ‘paragraph’ in a poem is called a stanza or a verse. Poetry does not necessarily have to have ordered/regular standards.Poetry is evocative.

10 Words That Don't Mean What You May Think They Do by Mark Nichol As English evolves, word meanings shift and turn, sometimes reversing themselves altogether. These ten words have shifted their senses over the years. In some cases, we are wise to likewise be flexible; in others, we relax our vocabulary at the expense of useful distinctions: 100 Exquisite Adjectives By Mark Nichol Adjectives — descriptive words that modify nouns — often come under fire for their cluttering quality, but often it’s quality, not quantity, that is the issue. Plenty of tired adjectives are available to spoil a good sentence, but when you find just the right word for the job, enrichment ensues. Practice precision when you select words. Here’s a list of adjectives: Subscribe to Receive our Articles and Exercises via Email

Rhythm and Meter in English Poetry Rhythm and Meter in English Poetry English poetry employs five basic rhythms of varying stressed (/) and unstressed (x) syllables. The meters are iambs, trochees, spondees, anapests and dactyls. In this document the stressed syllables are marked in boldface type rather than the tradition al "/" and "x." 13 Wonderful Old English Words We Should Still Be Using Today As the years pass, language evolves. Since the days of Chaucer and Shakespeare, we can all agree English has become less flowery. Some fantastic vocabulary just dropped out of everyday conversation. Author Mark Forsyth writes about the words we’ve lost. Using Social Media to Land New Writing Gigs By Shawndra Russell, @ShawndraRussell Social media opens up a world of opportunity for us writers. You can create a private Notice-Me List on Twitter filled with publications you want to write for and editors you want to work with, so you can be sure to interact with them frequently.

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