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Terrafugia

The Transition® is the transportation of the future today. A street-legal airplane that converts between flying and driving modes in under a minute, the Transition® brings a new level of freedom, flexibility, and fun to personal aviation. It gives the pilot the option to land and drive in bad weather, provides integrated ground transportation on both ends of the flight, and fits in a standard single car garage at home. The Transition® can fly in and out of over 5,000 public airports in the U.S. and is legal to drive on public roads and highways. It is the only light aircraft designed to meet Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards, and it is also equipped with a full-vehicle parachute for additional safety. Terrafugia is in the advanced stages of testing the Transition® in preparation for early production.

http://www.terrafugia.com/welcome

Related:  science fiction and future

May 2010 Image Copyright Marvel Entertainment, LLC, 2010 Director: Jon Favreau Production Designer: Michael Riva To late?? Ok, this time it's really been a while. Fear the Zippy Zapping Robo-Chopper It’s a bird, it’s a plane … it’s a fast-flying stun-gunning robocopter? You better believe it. The Shadowhawk is the latest development in automated grenade flinging – a remote controlled toy-sized helicopter that can record footage as easily as it can shoot a stun baton. 75 film spacecraft Continued from PART 5 10: Slave 1 - Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back (1980)| RETURN TO INDEX There must be some street-lamps in America with designs very unfamiliar to me, given how many people have commented that bounty hunter Boba Fett's bizarre spaceship looks like a street-lamp. In Star Wars: The Annotated Screenplays by Laurent Bouzereau, Slave 1 designer Nilo Rodis-Jamero sets the record straight: "Joe Johnston showed me some of the ideas he has for Boba Fett, and I remember asking myself what his spaceship would look like. I remember seeing a radar dish and stopping to sketch it very quickly to see if I could get something out of it.

Home - iCar 101 - The ultimate roadable aircraft Skip to main content iCar 101 PoP Exclusive preview of iCar 101 PoP on Facebook Read all news That Time US Congress Considered Building Cities In Space Forget the flying cars and robot maids, we’re just a few precious generations away from ditching this hunk of space rock called Earth and living among the stars. The dream of off-world living is thanks, in large part, to a single Princeton physics professor who not only envisioned a new path for humanity but nearly convinced Congress to go along with it. Piers Biznoy explains just how close we came to building orbital habitats in the 1980s in his new book New Space Frontiers. Today it is hard to imagine a time when US Senators listened in rapt attention while a charismatic lecturer argued for the construction of giant orbiting habitats as a way of easing environmental pressures on Earth.

A Brief Rant on the Future of Interaction Design So, here's a Vision Of The Future that's popular right now. It's a lot of this sort of thing. As it happens, designing Future Interfaces For The Future used to be my line of work. I had the opportunity to design with real working prototypes, not green screens and After Effects, so there certainly are some interactions in the video which I'm a little skeptical of, given that I've actually tried them and the animators presumably haven't. But that's not my problem with the video. My problem is the opposite, really — this vision, from an interaction perspective, is not visionary.

Fermi paradox A graphical representation of the Arecibo message – Humanity's first attempt to use radio waves to actively communicate its existence to alien civilizations The Fermi paradox (or Fermi's paradox) is the apparent contradiction between high estimates of the probability of the existence of extraterrestrial civilization and humanity's lack of contact with, or evidence for, such civilizations.[1] The basic points of the argument, made by physicists Enrico Fermi and Michael H. Hart, are: The Sun is a young star. There are billions of stars in the galaxy that are billions of years older;some of these stars probably have Earth-like planets[2] which, if the Earth is typical, may develop intelligent life;presumably, some of these civilizations will develop interstellar travel, a technology Earth is investigating even now, such as that used in the proposed 100 Year Starship;at any practical pace of interstellar travel, the galaxy can be completely colonized in a few tens of millions of years.

Superhydrophobic spray means no more washing clothes – among others Ross Technology Corp, a company that focuses on steel products has created a new product based on the spray known as NeverWet – which aside from being useful, is also pretty cool. Now, this might not seem particularly interesting, but it has a myriad of applications; it is built from nanoparticles and it is hydrophobic – not only that it stops water from wetting it, but it shoots water right of from the surface on which it was applied. Even if at first they wanted to apply this technology to steel, they quickly realized the enormous list of applications this can have, from shoes and clothes that wouldn’t require washing any more, to your phone that could become waterproof, or just on stuff that you don’t want bacteria to get on.

Why Aren't Aliens Calling Earth? This article was originally published on The Conversation. The publication contributed this article to Space.com's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights. We’ve been conditioned by television and movies to accept the likelihood of intelligent life elsewhere in the universe. “Of course there’s intelligent life out there; I saw it last week on Star Trek.”

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