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Learning Theories for the Digital Age

Learning Theories for the Digital Age
Related:  digital literacyAmerican TESOL Shelly Terrell & Ed Tech

Twitter Handbook for Teachers Week 1 - What Is Connectivism? ~ CCK11 You are not logged in. [] [] [Outline] [Week 2] Dates: January 17 - 24, 2011 Overview At its heart, connectivism is the thesis that knowledge is distributed across a network of connections, and therefore that learning consists of the ability to construct and traverse those networks. Readings SeminarsSeminars Wednesday: Live Session: Location: Elluminate (Click Here to Join). Activities A few simple activities for this week: 1. 2. 3. It is especially important to use this tag in del.icio.us and in Twitter. If you are using a blog, Flickr, or a discussion group, share the RSS feed.

#review: Technologically Mediated Embodiment This is the first post in a new Cyborgology series we call #review. #review Features links to, summaries of, and discussions around academic journal articles and books. This week, I’m reviewing: Goodings, Lewis and Ian Tucker. 2014. Goodings and Tucker work to understand the difficulties of embodiment in light of pervasive technological mediation, and in particular, Facebook’s Timeline. The authors refer to technologically mediated embodiment as that embodiment which exists in light of, and conjunction with, pervasive electronic and digital media. Goodings and Tucker address the first issue—blurring of network boundaries—utilizing Serres theory of communication. …[W]hen online bodies are fed back to us through Facebook there can be a sequence of unanticipated connections. I love the use of Serres, and in particular, the “noise” metaphor. The authors are astute in their analysis of the affordances/constraints of Timeline.

Peer Learning Handbook | Peeragogy.org Why Learning Through Social Networks Is The Future by Paul Moss, edmerger.com Students Need Professional Learning Networks, Too Learning to create, manage and promote a professional learning network (PLN) will soon become, if it’s not already, one of the most necessary and sought after skills for a global citizen, and as such, must become a prominent feature of any school curriculum. Few progressive educationalists would argue that a personal learning network (PLN) is not incredibly valuable and important. Passionate advocates including Murray, Whitby, and Sheninger lead with clarity in such discussions. The wealth of professional development that stems from such a network is quickly defining it as an essential tool for teachers, and will, I believe, replace organised costly professional development undertaken by organisations. However presently, few discussions and promotions of PLN’s venture further than lauding specific benefits for teachers. 1. To curate or not to curate – that is actually not the question. 2. 3.

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How Online Educators Benefitted by Walking-the-Talk with Collaborative Instructional Design This post examines how instructors teaching online can develop pedagogical and instructional skills by collaborating, communicating and building knowledge online with peers using technological tools and applications. A paper published recently in the Journal of Online Teaching and Learning (JOLT) highlights (perhaps unknowingly) one of the most effective methods for teaching faculty and instructors how to become skilled in online pedagogy and instruction—walking-the-talk. In the paper instructors did exactly what the students need to do to learn effectively and deeply online, by collaborating, contributing knowledge, sharing and creating an artifact [in this case two online courses] virtually. What’s significant is that collaboration and learning occurred via technological applications, i.e. In order for seamless collaboration, communication, etc. to occur users [students, instructors] need to be familiar with the technical tool—they need to know how it works. References: Like this:

The 23 Best Game-Based Education Resources for 2014 Edudemic has covered game-based learning and gamification in the classroom on numerous occasions in the past. When learning becomes a game, it’s an enjoyable, effective experience for students and teachers alike. We’ve curated 23 of the best game-based education resources for 2014. If your class hasn’t gotten its game on yet, then now is the time. Understanding Game-Based Education Image via Flickr The concept of game-based education is one that’s easily dismissed as being frivolous or time-wasting. The Institute of Play explains how games nurture the higher-order thinking skills kids will need in their futures, including the ability to analyze and solve problems using media resources. Resources for Getting Started Even if you’re sold on the idea of game-based learning, you might be at a loss on where to begin. Tools You Can Use Once you’ve developed an understanding of game-based learning and decided how to get started, it’s time to move forward with deciding on the games you want to use.

12 Principles for Responding to Negative Online Comments Due to convenience, the opportunity to receive a direct response and the potential to kick up a fuss when not treated as they expect, customers are turning to social media for customer service and other product and service-related support rather than dealing with call centres. Despite this, a recent study shows that the top Singaporean telecoms operators together receive an average 1,700 negative customer comments a day via social media. Such volume requires dedicated teams to pick through the debris and assess which complaints should be answered and how. Singtel’s Facebook page, for instance, is testament to customers’ frustrations with what they see as the company’s poor 3G coverage, high costs and inferior customer service, to the extent that even the most anodyne promotion is belted with a slew of unrelated moans. Yet very few of these complaints are responded to. Here are six basic principles for handling difficult questions and statements on the social web. Connect: Authored by:

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