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Teaching Students to Dig Deeper

Teaching Students to Dig Deeper
Image credit: iStockphoto A backwoodsman went to a home improvement store and purchased a chainsaw to replace an old, worn-out saw. After a month, the backwoodsman returned the saw to the store, complaining, "It doesn't work worth a darn! I could hardly cut half the wood I normally do." The salesman, looking at the chainsaw and seeing nothing wrong with it, pulled the cord. The chainsaw started easily with a roar. Sometimes this happens when we try to help students to think deeper. Going Deep I am including an excerpt from my new book, Teaching Students to Dig Deeper: The Common Core in Action, that explains the differences in cognitive activities we commonly call higher-order thinking: Analytical thinking, and critical thinking are often lumped together with that other higher-order thinking skill (HOTS) known as problem-solving. Let me clarify. Analysis Vs. Suggested Strategies

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/teaching-students-dig-deeper-ben-johnson

Related:  Inquiry learning

Questioning Toolkit Essential Questions These are questions which touch our hearts and souls. They are central to our lives. They help to define what it means to be human. Most important thought during our lives will center on such essential questions. The Knowledge Gear Twenty-first century science offers a new way of looking at and understanding the workings of the human brain. We now know, for example, which areas of the brain activate when we decipher a written word, that a genetic variation might be at the root of dyslexia, and that the recycling of neural networks in our brains may be what allows us the uniquely human abilities of reading and writing. Neuroscientist Stanislas Dehaene (2009) refers to this new way of looking at reading and learning as the "neurocultural approach." Although these theories and understandings are just now materializing, there have long been five basic principles with implications not only for the learner but also for the content-area teacher who wants to plan instruction that helps students improve both their reading comprehension and their content learning. Revisiting the Five Basic Premises of Teaching Reading

Updated Padagogy Wheel Tackles The Problem Of Motivation In Education One of the biggest problems at the core of education is motivation. That’s according to the newest iteration of the popular Padagogy Wheel (pad for iPad instead of ‘ped’agogy) we showcased a couple weeks ago. Allan Carrington spent what must be counless hours thinking, revising, and refining the wheel you see below which is now at version 3.0. Be sure to click here to view version 2.0 of the wheel and click here to view version 1.0. What’s New In The Padagogy Wheel Version 3.0 Interactive Graphic Organizer Holt Interactive Graphic Organizers "Graphic organizers are tools that help your brain think." - Kylene Beers Graphic organizers are an illustration of your thoughts on paper. They can help you brainstorm, organize, and visualize your ideas. Click on a graphic organizer to download a PDF of it.

Recommended Resources www.stenhouse.com/fiae (For study guides for Fair Isn’t Always Equal, videos, responses to questions, articles, teacher testimonials, and much more) www.debbiesilver.com Differentiation Central (Carol Ann Tomlinson’s wonderful Website on Differentiation) Research that Supports Differentiated Instruction (From Differentiation Central) Putting Points and Percentages into the Past (Wonderful Prezi presentation on standards-based grading) Transforming Assessment (Great Website on assessment from the Education Ministry of British Columbia, Canada) social networking with students After being in full time tech integration for nearly seven years, I’ve had the privilege to return to the classroom at such a pivotal time in education. With the use of wonderful Web 2.0 tools and the ability to easily collaborate across the globe, students have opportunities today that weren’t even envisioned three years ago. One of those opportunities involves creating a professional learning community through Edmodo, a teacher moderated social network where students can share ideas, publish their work, and learn how to communicate effectively online.

Mentoring Minds As we venture into the 21st century, we as a society, are faced with more innovation and challenge than ever before. We now live in an interconnected world, where the Internet and global communications are simultaneously uniting and isolating us as a society. How do we raise critical thinkers to best face the challenges that face our modern society? What changes in education methods should be implemented to create a better learning environment for these budding minds? Check out this great infographic by Mentoring Minds to find out! Click here to download an 11X17 version of the "Developing 21st-Century Critical Thinkers" infographic.

Common Core Standards Make a Mockery of Novels' Complexity Here’s a pop quiz: according to the measurements used in the new Common Core Standards, which of these books would be complex enough for a ninth grader? a. Huckleberry Finn b. To Kill a Mockingbird c. lessons-at-home-homework-at-school-1.1538928# INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPERSCurrently teachers do not have the capacity to implement the laptop project because they have not been trained and the government has not developed a curriculum for the project. Picture: Matthew Jordaan Washington - When April Burton explains the intricacies of French grammar to her American classroom, the students are at home, in front of their computer or smartphone. As for the homework, they will do it the following day, at school, thanks to the “flipped” classrooms approach made possible thanks to new technologies that are transforming education. Burton, who teaches at Francis Howell Central High School in Cottleville, Missouri, decided last year to use the approach made popular in the United States since the Khan Academy began offering thousands of lessons and exercises online. “We really have to change the way things used to be done,” said Burton, a Southeast Missouri State University graduate in French education who has 14 years of teaching experience.

blooms taxonomy Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy is indeed a good tool to structure, to organize and to reflect on lessons as well as to facilitate deeper understanding. After reading Bloom’s and ICT Tools I found a very nice guideline on Storybird: Bloom’s Taxonomy in the Classroom which is an overview of actions, questions and activities for teaching practices. Plan 1: I share this with my colleagues and use this guideline for planning and reflecting my lessons more often. I would have never thought that there are so many more adjustments and adaptions of Bloom’s taxonomy. Several search keys in Google later I found Bloom’s Taxonomy for the iPads which interest me the most at the moment. Here are two examples:

A Day in the Life of a Close Reader We are almost at the end of our 7-week blog-a-thon on #closereading! We invite YOU to join in! Find more on how-to here. Several selected posts have already been linked to on the Contributors page and we are looking forward to your addition. Let’s closely read the practice of close reading together! About Are you looking for new ways to teach kids about math and science? Do you want activities that meet you where you live, whether your “classroom” is an active volcano, the shark tank at the local aquarium, or your own kitchen table? You’ve come to the right place. Howtosmile.org is collecting the best educational materials on the web and creating learning activities, tools, and services – all designed especially for those who teach school-aged kids in non-classroom settings.

Apps to Support Bloom's Taxonomy - Android, Google, iPad and Web 2.0 I had seen two great charts Kathy Schrock had made about Apps to Support Bloom's taxonomy. I have seen, and used, the ones for Android and Google. I just found two more on her site: iPad and Web 2.0 Apps.

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