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13 Medicinal Plants Worth Planting

13 Medicinal Plants Worth Planting
Aloe Vera The aloe vera grows only under the sun with well drained dry or moist soil. Although the plant tastes like turd, it’s still edible. The sap from aloe vera is extremely useful to speed up the healing and reducing the risk of infections for : woundscutsburnseczemareducing inflammation Apart from its external use on the skin, aloe vera is also taken internally in the treatment of : ulcerative colitis (drinking aloe vera juice)chronic constipationpoor appetitedigestive problemsMarsh Mallow The plant of which marshmallows are made of. inflammations and irritations of the urinary and respiratory mucus membranescounter excess stomach acidpeptic ulcerationgastritis Externally, the root is applied to : bruisessprainsaching musclesinsect bitesskin inflammationssplinters The leaves are very edible, unlike the aloe vera. Great Burdock It requires moist soil and can grow shadeless. boilsrashesburnsbruisesherpeseczemaacneimpetigoringwormbites Pot Marigold Gotu Kola Globe Artichoke ulcersboilsabscesses Related:  Edible Garden - Flowers and HerbsHerbs, Fugus, Ect

Les pieds dans l’eau utre plante qui vit les pieds dans l’eau, mais plus discrète : l’ache-faux-cresson (apium nodiflorum). Elle doit son nom à deux points communs qu’elle a avec le cresson (nasturtium officinale). Le premier, c’est la forme de ses feuilles. Sans être 100% identiques, il y a tout de même une forte similitude. Le second, c’est le milieu dans lequel elle pousse : les eaux peu profondes. Pourtant, cette proche cousine du céleri (apium graveolens) n’a rien à voir avec le cresson. Ache faux cresson (apium nodiflorum) avec une ombelle très caractéristique.Photo prise en juin dernier Car l’ache-faux-cresson est une ombellifère (apiacée). Comme avec le cresson, il vaut mieux éviter de la consommer crue afin d’éviter une contamination à la douve du foie, pouvant provoquer des troubles très graves. Soupe des bords du ruisseau Ingrédients (pour 4) : Préparation :

Adventures in Field Botany / Illustrated-Glossary Leaf Morphology: Phyllode/ Cladode: modifyed stems that act as leaves. Ensiform: leaves sharp edges, taper into a slender point (fern) Stellate: hairs come up like fingers. Looks like cluster of hair. Peltate: "petiole joins to the center" in leaves. Glossary of Terms: WHORLED - more than two (2) opposite leaves. OPPOSITE - leaf nodes are on opposite sides of twig. ALTERNATE - leaf nodes alternate in pattern along branch. DECUSSATE - Arranged on a stem in opposite pairs at right angles to those above or below, resulting in vertical rows of leaves. PALMATE - consisting of leaflets or lobes radiating from the base of the leaf. CAPSULE - a hollow dry fruit with 3+ locules (chambers) Dehiscent = splits open to release the seed. Indehiscent: remaining closed, do not split open at maturity. Capsule Types- Dehiscent: Capsule breaks to release fruit Indehiscent: This is a drupe, no hard capsule that is made to split open A walnut is a drupe fruit. OVATE (ovoid) OBOVATE (obovoid) ELLIPTICAL Root Index

Granny Woman Ozark Herbs Edible and Medicinal Plants The information on this page is presented in an older format. We have vastly expanded our edible plants information with far more information, and far more plants. You can find this information at our new site Wildcrafting.net Abal Calligonum comosum Description: The abal is one of the few shrubby plants that exists in the shady deserts. Habitat and Distribution: This plant is found in desert scrub and waste in any climatic zone. Edible Parts: This plant's general appearance would not indicate its usefulness to the survivor, but while this plant is flowering in the spring, its fresh flowers can be eaten. Acacia Acacia farnesiana Description: Acacia is a spreading, usually short tree with spines and alternate compound leaves. Habitat and Distribution: Acacia grows in open, sunny areas. Note: There are about 500 species of acacia. Edible Parts: Its young leaves, flowers, and pods are edible raw or cooked. Agave Agave species Habitat and Distribution: Agaves prefer dry, open areas.

Edible Flowers Chart Edible Flowers This chart is a collaborative research project by Amy Barclay de Tolly and Home Cooking Guide Peggy Trowbridge. The links will take you to full color photos of the specific flowers to help with identification, but please don't depend solely on these photos. Be sure you know exactly what you choose to consume. • Poisonous Plants and Flowers Chart • Edible Flowers Information and Recipes • Herb Information • Spice Information • A to Z Recipes and Food Disclaimer: The author and Home Cooking Guide have thoroughly researched all the aforementioned edible flowers. • Edible Flowers Chart • Edible Flowers Information and Recipes • Herb Information • Spice Information • A to Z Recipes and Food More Herb RecipesReturn to Recipe Index A to Z Recipes and Food | Articles by Topic

Why Eat Wild Herbs and Edible Plants? The Benefits of Wild Edible Plants For hundreds of years people took advantage of the medicine cabinet at their doorstep. Before the advent of processed foods and modern convenience stores, wild plants were a common dietary supplement. They were the ultimate natural multivitamin! Often the plants we call weeds have therapeutic value. Why eat wild herbs? They are power packed with phyto-nutrients, hundreds of times the vitamin and mineral density of a supermarket lettuce. What if you live in the city? Not everyone lives in the countryside these days, with healthy spray free wild herbs at their doorstep. Drink herbal teas made from wild herbs, like nettle . If you do live rurally, how do you spot the good ones? People ask us, "how do you avoid the poisonous ones?” What to do with wild herbs and dark leafy greens? Wild herbs can be juiced (the forerunner to wheat grass juice!) What are some of our favourite wild herbs? Nettle - see the article on nettles -makes a nice quiche! Hi Anna, Kind regards

Edible Flowers, How to choose Edible Flowers, Eatable Flowers, Edible Flower Chart, List of Edible Flowers, Incredible Edible Flowers Edible flowers are the new rage in haute cuisine Photo of edible flowers picked in Linda's garden in July (lavender, thyme, dill, cilantro, day lily, squash blossom, Nasturtiums, chives, and basil). After falling out of favor for many years, cooking and garnishing with flowers is back in vogue once again. Flower cookery has been traced back to Roman times, and to the Chinese, Middle Eastern, and Indian cultures. Today, many restaurant chefs and innovative home cooks garnish their entrees with flower blossoms for a touch of elegance. One very important thing that you need to remember is that not every flower is edible. In fact, sampling some flowers can make you very, very sick. You also should NEVER use pesticides or other chemicals on any part of any plant that produces blossoms you plan to eat. Never harvest flowers growing by the roadside. Identify the flower exactly and eat only edible flowers and edible parts of those flowers. How To Choose Edible Flowers - Edible Flower Chart:

Top 5 Herbs To Grow For Cooking & Medicinal Use If you're new here, you may want to sign up for FREE weekly updates delivered to your inbox featuring Real Food recipes, nutrition & health articles, and special discounts or promotions. P.S. This post may contain affiliate links to products or services I use, enjoy, or recommend. The following is a guest-post by Brenda Scott of The Well-Fed Homestead. So you want to grow herbs for cooking and for medicinal use, but you’ve got a small space to grow them in. Sage Medicinal Uses of Sage Use sage internally to treat fevers, bronchitis, headaches, canker sores, sinus congestion, sore throats and bad breath. More information about Sage’s healing properties: Recipes That Use Sage Brown Butter Sage from Learning and Yearning Lemon-Sage Garlic Chicken from Food Loves Writing Turkey with CranApple Sage Stuffing from Real Food University Rosemary and Sage Zucchini Pickles from Small Footprint Family Peppermint Medicinal Uses of Peppermint More information about Peppermint’s healing properties: Dill Fennel

Harvesting and Drying Calendula Mrs. Homegrown here: Okay, so in a previous post I talked about growing Calendula. This post I’m going to talk about harvesting and drying it. When to harvest: Start harvesting your Calendula as soon as the first flush of flowers is in full bloom. The ideal time to harvest is in the morning, before it gets warm, but after the dew dries. A side note regarding seeds: If you don’t harvest the heads, they die back on their own, and then they’ll go to seed fast. What parts to harvest: I harvest the flower heads only, though I understand that the foliage has much the same properties as the flowers. To harvest, I either pinch off the heads or cut off the heads with scissors. How to dry: Bring the flower heads indoors, into an area out of direct sunlight. Spread the heads out face down on a dishtowel or a sheet or newspaper or for fancy, an old window screen stretched between two chairs. Of course, if you have a dehydrator you could use one of those. When are they dry enough? Yes. Storage:

10 Mosquitoes Controlling Plants for Home Mosquitoes are among the biggest nuisance of monsoon that ruins the outdoor fun. Bites of mosquitoes are extremely itchy as well as spread diseases such as malaria. People use mosquito coils, mosquito repellent creams, electronic mosquito repellents and herbal mosquito lotions to keep mosquitoes at a bay. Some people are allergic to these things and get nasal cavity, skin and throat problems. People also use chemicals to control mosquitoes which cause bad effect to health and environment. If you want to control mosquitoes through natural way then plant some mosquito repellent plants in your yard. Mosquito Repellent Plants 1) Rosemary Rosemary herb contains oil which acts as a natural mosquito repellent. 2) Citronella Grass Citronella grass is excellent for controlling mosquitoes. 3) Marigold Marigolds have peculiar odor that many insects, humans and animals dislike. 4) Catnip Catnip is an herb which is connected to mint family. 5) Ageratum Ageratum plant is another mosquito repellent plant.

How to make a Calendula oil infusion So finally I get around to finishing off this mini series on Calendula (pot marigold). This post will be on infusing oil, and next week we’ll have the one on salves. We’ve already covered the growing and drying Calendula: Oil infusion is as simple as can be. The resulting oil is medicinal. But lets step backwards a bit and talk about materials. Materials Your herb–Calendula or anything else– should be dry when you start this. Now, to be sure, I know folks who infuse fresh herbs in oil, and they’re not all dropping dead. Regarding Calendula specifically, you can soak either the petals alone, or the whole flower heads. Your oil doesn’t have to be super high grade. It doesn’t have to be olive oil, either, but it should be something good for the skin, like jojoba oil or grapeseed oil. The Soaking All you have to do is fill a very clean jar with a good lid about half way full of dried herb, then top it off with oil. This not an exact science, so don’t get worked up about exact quantities. Harvest

Top 10 Herbs For Memory Share Many people associate memory loss with aging. But whether it’s occasional forgetfulness or loss of short-term memory, one must be aware that there are specific factors that can cause it even at a young age instead of simply attributing memory loss to a natural decline in cognitive functioning. These causes include alcohol, drug or tobacco abuse, certain medications, sleeplessness, stress and depression, nutritional deficiency, head injury, stroke and dementia. Whether to prevent or treat memory loss, these natural herbs have served as timeless aids: Gingko Biloba There is a reason why gingko biloba supplements are one of the most popular herbal medications in Europe and America. The mechanism behind gingko leaves is due to the presence of two types of chemicals, flavonoids and terpenoids, which contain antioxidants to combat free radicals that contribute to health disorders like Alzheimer’s and dementia. Ginseng Rosemary This herb is more than just an aromatic spice. Sage Green tea

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