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Inquiry-Questions - home

Inquiry-Questions - home
Related:  risullyinquiryInquiry learning

A New Programming Language That Can Shape Our DNA Scientists have studied the behavior of complex biological molecules such as DNA for decades. Now they are moving to being able to control that behavior in test tubes and inside cells. Last month, a team led at the University of Washington announced they had devised and successfully tested a programming language that can guide the assembly of synthetic DNA molecules into a circuit that can perform a task, just as a software developer would write code to send commands to a computer. Chemists have always used mathematical models to study how molecules behave in mixtures. “Instead of thinking of this as a descriptive language that allows you to understand the chemistry, we said, we’re going to create a prescriptive language that allows you to program something,” says Georg Seelig, an assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the school. A lot of work remains, but the broader field of synthetic biology is growing.

Visible Thinking Purpose and Goals Visible Thinking is a flexible and systematic research-based approach to integrating the development of students' thinking with content learning across subject matters. An extensive and adaptable collection of practices, Visible Thinking has a double goal: on the one hand, to cultivate students' thinking skills and dispositions, and, on the other, to deepen content learning. By thinking dispositions, we mean curiosity, concern for truth and understanding, a creative mindset, not just being skilled but also alert to thinking and learning opportunities and eager to take them Who is it for? Key Features and Practices At the core of Visible Thinking are practices that help make thinking visible: Thinking Routines loosely guide learners' thought processes and encourage active processing. A key feature of the Visible Thinking approach is the Teacher Study Group as described in the School-Wide Culture of Thinking section. License

4 Phases of Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guide For Teachers According to Indiana University Bloomington, Inquiry-based learning is an “instructional model that centers learning on a solving a particular problem or answering a central question. There are several different inquiry-based learning models, but most have several general elements in common: Learning focuses around a meaningful, ill-structured problem that demands consideration of diverse perspectivesAcademic content-learning occurs as a natural part of the process as students work towards finding solutionsLearners, working collaboratively, assume an active role in the learning processTeachers provide learners with learning supports and rich multiple media sources of information to assist students in successfully finding solutionsLearners share and defend solutions publicly in some manner” The process itself can be broken down into stages, or phases, that help teachers frame instruction. 4 Phases of Inquiry-Based Learning: A Guide For Teachers 1. Student-to-material. 2. 3. 4.

A chimp-pig hybrid origin for humans? (Phys.org) —These days, getting a Ph.D. is probably the last thing you want to do if you are out to revolutionize the world. If, however, what you propose is an idea, rather than a technology, it can still be a valuable asset to have. Dr. Eugene McCarthy is a Ph.D. geneticist who has made a career out of studying hybridization in animals. Generally speaking, interspecies hybrids—like mules, ligers (lion-tiger hybrids), or zedonks (zebra-donkey hybrids)—are less fertile than the parents that produced them. This latter possibility may not sound so far-fetched after you read the riveting details suggesting that the origin of the gorilla may be best explained by hybridization with the equally massive forest hog. It is not yet clear if or when genetic data might support, or refute, our hybrid origins. McCarthy has done extensive research into the broader issues, and shortcomings, of our currently incomplete theory of evolution. Share Video undefined

Science: Rocks and Minerals Global rating average: 1.0 out of 51.01.01.01.01.0 These sites describe various rocks and minerals. Learn about igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks and some of the more common minerals. Grades Links ThinkQuest: A Wonderful World of Minerals Click on "Minerals" to learn about them. Education Standards Request State Standards David Didau: The Learning Spy | Brain food for the thinking teacher Scientist Proves DNA Can Be Reprogrammed by Words and Frequencies © Adam Scott Miller We came across this article today and thought that it would be a great read for our viewers. It’s awesome information showing the true nature of our reality and how science is changing everyday, opening up to the possibilities of this reality. “Scientist Prove DNA Can Be Reprogrammed by Words and Frequencies By Grazyna Fosar and Franz Bludorf THE HUMAN DNA IS A BIOLOGICAL INTERNET and superior in many aspects to the artificial one. Only 10% of our DNA is being used for building proteins. The Russian biophysicist and molecular biologist Pjotr Garjajev and his colleagues also explored the vibrational behavior of the DNA. One can simply use words and sentences of the human language! This finally and scientifically explains why affirmations, autogenous training, hypnosis and the like can have such strong effects on humans and their bodies. Garjajev’s research group succeeded in proving that with this method chromosomes damaged by x-rays for example can be repaired.

Introduction 1. Students learn isolated skills and knowledge, starting with the simple building blocks of a particular topic and then building to more complex ideas. While this appeals to common sense (think of the efficiency of a automobile assembly line), the problem with this approach is the removal of any context to the learning, making deep understanding of the content less likely. Perkins calls this approach elementitis, where learning is structured exclusively around disconnected skills and fragmented pieces of information. 2. The solution that Perkins offers to the typical classroom experience is what he calls learning by wholes, structuring learning around opportunities to experience or engage in the topic as it would exist outside of school. An example of ‘learning by wholes’ can be found in my own Cigar Box Project, a year-long, grade 7 study where students explored 5 themes in Canadian history. Inquiry as “Play” Structuring Inquiry with Liberating Constraints Moving From Theory to Practice

The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know - TeachThought The Neuroscience Of Learning: 41 Terms Every Teacher Should Know by Judy Willis M.D., M.Ed., radteach.com As education continues to evolve, adding in new trends, technologies, standards, and 21st century thinking habits, there is one constant that doesn’t change. The human brain. But neuroscience isn’t exactly accessible to most educators, rarely published, and when it is, it’s often full of odd phrasing and intimidating jargon. Worse, there seems to be a disconnect between the dry science of neurology, and the need teachers have for relevant tools, resources, and strategies in the classroom. As for the jargon, Judy Willis, teacher, neuroscientist, and consultant has put together an A-Z glossary of relevant neuroscience terms for teachers and administrators to help clarify the jargon. The best approach with a list like this is to bookmark and share the page, and comeback to it intermittently. Baby steps. 41 Neuroscience Terms Every Teacher Should Know Affective filter Amygdala Axon Cerebellum

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