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Design: design in motion

Design: design in motion
Welcome to a new era of design-led innovation. IBM Design engages and inspires forward-thinking individuals everywhere to impact humanity in ways that matter and endure. We’re looking for designers who will conceive, articulate and lead the future of IBM’s entire product portfolio. If you are passionate about solving critical and complex problems, interacting directly with end users, working with powerful technology, and ultimately delivering exceptional experiences through great design — we look forward to hearing from you. Industry professionals and upcoming or recent college graduates are welcome to apply. Full-time and internship positions are available to start immediately.

http://www.ibm.com/design/

CSS Animation for Beginners The human brain is hardwired to pay attention to moving objects. Because of this natural reflex to notice movement, adding animation to your website or app is a powerful way to draw users attention to important areas of your product and add interest to your interface. When done well, animations can add valuable interaction and feedback, as well as enhance the emotional experience, bring delight, and add personality to your interface. In fact, to animate means to bring to life. XpVelocity extreme programming · project planning · estimation tags: Velocity is a notion from ExtremeProgramming that helps calibrate a plan, tying broad statements of effort into elapsed time. Velocity is a statement of how much stuff a team (or a person if it's personal velocity) gets done in a time period. You should usually determine velocity by measuring how much got done in past periods, following the principle of YesterdaysWeather. A typical approach is to average the velocity the past three time periods to determine velocity for future time periods.

Fact vs. Fiction: What Usability is Not A close friend asked me a few days ago – “You’ve covered decent ground on the science, dimensions, characteristics, design aspects, process and pervasiveness of usability considerations. How about doing a reverse bit? What usability is not about? Or the myths of usability?” UX and Agile: Tying the knot "Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue, and a silver thruppence in her shoe."—classic wedding tradition In the modern software development environment, UX and agile practitioners are becoming part of a growing culture defining the way online products and services are being delivered. The modern UX team is much more multi-disciplinary and organic than ever before, and it's no surprise that hybrid processes and methodologies are being employed to ensure better management of personnel and project deliverables. Although UX and agile both address key pitfalls that exist in traditional software development to deliver a better solution for the end-user, sometimes UX and agile approaches seem to work against each other when people focus too much on the processes and procedures. Here are some factors and advice for a happy marriage between the two.

Passive magic, design of delightful experience Why is Google Maps on a mobile device so amazing and delightful? Why does Word Lens feel so mind-blowing? Why does a Prius feel so good when you get in and go? Why does it feel satisfying to look down at the lighted keyboard on the Mac? It is noteworthy when the design of an experience is so compelling that you feel wonder and delight. So Agile Together: How designers and programmers can join forces to create great experiences Earlier this year, I attended a UX meetup that featured a panel discussing whether or not integrating UX designers into the agile software practice works. I noticed during the discussion that the panelists made strong distinctions between "developers" and UX designers. While this is commonplace, it stood out to me because I’m primarily working on the development side as a programmer, but I have an interest and background in user experience. I realize the need in larger organizations to hire for specific positions, but I think that as long as we maintain these distinctions, UX designers will not be able to effectively work within the agile software process. I also think the skill sets and aptitude for programmers and UX designers have significant overlap.

Redefining Hick's Law Advertisement Hick’s Law has always been a popular reference point for designers. You’ll find it cited in the endless lists of basic laws and principles that all designers should be familiar with. Given our assumed comfort level with this design cornerstone, I am surprised to see so many people getting it wrong. What we think we understand about Hick’s Law as it pertains to Web design is oversimplified and incomplete. We need to more deeply investigate what Hick’s Law can do for Web design.

7 Agile Best Practices that You Don’t Need to Follow There are many good ideas and practices in Agile development, ideas and practices that definitely work: breaking projects into Small Releases to manage risk and accelerate feedback; time-boxing to limit WIP and keep everyone focused; relying only on working software as the measure of progress; simple estimating and using velocity to forecast team performance; working closely and constantly with the customer; and Continuous Integration – and Continuous Delivery – to ensure that code is always working and stable. But there are other commonly accepted ideas and best practices that aren’t important: if you don’t follow them, nothing bad will happen to you and your project will still succeed. And there are a couple that you are better off not following at all. Test-Driven Development Teams that need to move quickly need to depend on a fast, efficient testing safety net. TDD is not only a way of ensuring that developers test their code.

Dieter Rams / Selector for 25/25 - Celebrating 25 Years of Design Dieter Rams Industrial Designer (1932-) Selector for 25/25 - Celebrating 25 Years of Design 29 March - 22 June 2007 As head of design at Braun, the German consumer electronics manufacturer, DIETER RAMS (1932-) emerged as one of the most influential industrial designers of the late 20th century by defining an elegant, legible, yet rigorous visual language for its products. Good design is innovative. Good design makes a product useful. Good design is aesthetic.

Given-When-Then Given-When-Then is a style of representing tests - or as its advocates would say - specifying a system's behavior using SpecificationByExample. It's an approach developed by Dan North and Chris Matts as part of Behavior-Driven Development (BDD). [1] It appears as a structuring approach for many testing frameworks such as Cucumber. You can also look at it as a reformulation of the Four-Phase Test pattern. The essential idea is to break down writing a scenario (or test) into three sections: Why We Need Storytellers at the Heart of Product Development There's an interesting question on Quora right now: If you had to pick between an amazing product designer or an amazing engineer to build a new company around, which would you pick and why? This question reflects a painful problem that is common at both small startups and large corporate organizations.

Pair Programming Interviews September 11, 2013 About Me My name is Parth Upadhyay and I'm a rising senior at the University of Texas at Austin, majoring in Computer Science. This summer, I interned at Square on the Register team. Five Indispensable Skills for UX Mastery By Jared M. Spool Originally published: Aug 03, 2010 For practicing User Experience Designers, one of the most important laws isn't Fitts's Law, which helps us understand how to design interactive elements. Nor is it Hick's Law, which describes how long people take to make decisions. It's Sturgeon's Law, which tells us that 99% of everything is crap.

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