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David Lynch Teaches You to Cook His Quinoa Recipe in a Weird, Surrealist Video A staple of Andean diets for thousands of years, quinoa (KEEN-wah) has been touted as a superfood recently for its high protein content and potential to solve hunger crises. It’s represented by the usual celebrities: Kate Moss, Gwyneth Paltrow, Jennifer Aniston … and David Lynch. Oh yes, have you not tried David Lynch’s quinoa recipe? Well, you must. If you’ve remained unswayed by the glitterati, perhaps this very Lynchian of pitches will turn you on to the grain. By Part Two of Lynch’s video recipe, we are fully immersed in a place seemingly far away from quinoa, a place of the portentous topography of David Lynch’s inner life. Yield: 1 bowl Cooking Time: 17 minutes Ingredients: 1/2 cup quinoa 1 1/2 cups organic broccoli (chilled, from bag) 1 cube vegetable bullion Braggs Liquid Aminos Extra virgin olive oil Sea salt Preparation: * Fill medium saucepan with about an inch of fresh water. * Set pan on stove, light a nice hot flame add several dashes of sea salt. * Look at the quinoa.

Lucid Dreaming Techniques: A Guide To Lucid Dream Induction Here are my top lucid dreaming techniques for beginners. They range from simple memory exercises (like Reality Checks and Mnemonic Induction of Lucid Dreams) to specialized meditation (like Wake Induced Lucid Dreams). Lucid Dreaming Tutorials For step-by-step tutorials and audio tools for lucid dream induction and exploration, check out my Lucid Dreaming Fast Track study program for beginners and beyond. 52 Ways to Have Lucid Dreams A complete list of 52 ways to have lucid dreams - based on visualization, memory, supplements, sleep cycles and more methods than you can shake a stick at. How to Have Lucid Dreams A summary of my favorite lucid dreaming techniques, from improving dream recall, to programming your dreams, to meditation and self-hypnosis. How to Remember Your Dreams To lucid dream, you must first remember your dreams. Keeping a Dream Journal How to Perform Reality Checks How to Improve Your Self Awareness Lucid Dreams and Prospective Memory Dream Induced Lucid Dreams (DILDs)

Researchers Find Out How a New Concept Makes Its Way into the Brain Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) scientists have documented the formation of a newly learned concept inside the brain and found that it occurs in the same brain areas for everyone. In other words, brain's "filing system" is same for everyone. To prove this, leading neuroscientist Marcel Just pointed to the Smithsonian Institute's 2013 announcement about the olinguito, a newly identified carnivore species that mainly eats fruits and lives by itself in the treetops of rainforests. Millions of people read the information about the olinguito and in doing so permanently changed their own brains. "When people learned that the olinguito eats mainly fruit instead of meat, a region of their left inferior frontal gyrus - as well as several other areas - in the brain stored the new information according to its own code," said Just, the D.O Hebb University professor of cognitive neuroscience at CMU. The research appeared in the journal Human Brain Mapping. Source: IANS

Ultimate test « Let ε < 0. In honor of the end of the semester, I present the following in-class exam. I’ve been told you can find this in William Nivak’s “The Big Book of New American Humor.” INSTRUCTIONS Read each of the following fifteen problems carefully. Answer all parts to each problem. Time limit: 4 hours. Begin immediately. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

8 Great Stuffed Pork Recipes for Easy & Elegant Dinners - Dinner Tonight - Cooking We love stuffed pork chops as much as we love, well, every other great recipe that calls for stuffing pork. And that’s what we’re concentrating on here — wonderful stuffings and ways to cook pork tenderloin and pork roasts. We even found a pork sandwich that calls for stuffing, which sounds kind of weird at first because a sandwich is already something that is stuffed. Isn’t It? Never mind. The recipes we’ve chosen are beautiful and often unusual; we found one for rolled loins stuffed with grapes and another dish that’s filled with wonderful of-the-season apples. The big point we’re trying to make is that fall is the time for pork, no matter how you cook it. What we mean is: The next time you feel like pigging out, maybe you should pork out instead. Stuffed Pork Loin Here’s the easy way to kick things off — with a classic roast stuffed with spinach, dried cherries, and nuts. Herb-Stuffed Pork Tenderloin Stuffed Pork Roast with Herb Seasoned Artichoke and Mushroom Stuffing

Lucid Dreaming Frequently Asked Questions Answered by The Lucidity Institute Version 2.4 © Lucidity Institute (contact us) This FAQ is a brief introduction to lucid dreaming: what it is, how to do it, and what can be done with it. There are several excellent sources of information on lucid dreaming, the most reliable and extensive of which is the Lucidity Institute website ( Other sources are listed below. Stephen LaBerge presents workshops, and training programs for learning lucid dreaming. "I first heard of lucid dreaming in April of 1982, when I took a course from Dr. 3.4 WHAT TECHNOLOGY IS AVAILABLE TO ASSIST LUCID DREAMING TRAINING? How language can affect the way we think Keith Chen (TED Talk: Could your language affect your ability to save money?) might be an economist, but he wants to talk about language. For instance, he points out, in Chinese, saying “this is my uncle” is not as straightforward as you might think. In Chinese, you have no choice but to encode more information about said uncle. The language requires that you denote the side the uncle is on, whether he’s related by marriage or birth and, if it’s your father’s brother, whether he’s older or younger. “All of this information is obligatory. This got Chen wondering: Is there a connection between language and how we think and behave? While “futured languages,” like English, distinguish between the past, present and future, “futureless languages” like Chinese use the same phrasing to describe the events of yesterday, today and tomorrow. But that’s only the beginning. Featured illustration via iStock.

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