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Teaching Kids to Code

Teaching Kids to Code
Every era demands--and rewards--different skills. In different times and different places, we have taught our children to grow vegetables, build a house, forge a sword or blow a delicate glass, bake bread, create a soufflé, write a story or shoot hoops. Now we are teaching them to code. We are teaching them to code, however, not so much as an end in itself but because our world has morphed: so many of the things we once did with elements such as fire and iron, or tools such as pencil and paper, are now wrought in code. We are teaching coding to help our kids craft their future. In this collection we share many different perspectives on coding, from a university professor's vantage point (MIT's Mitch Resnick describes why learning to code is like learning to learn) to an entrepreneur's reflections from his cross-country roadtrip to bring coding--and his stuffed dog--to classrooms across the U.S. We should always teach children to bake bread, feed the goats and wield a hammer.

Gamestar Mechanic Cargo-Bot – iPad The first game programmed entirely on iPad® Be Logical. Play Cargo-Bot Presenting Cargo-Bot. Get it for free on the App Store. Cargo-Bot is a puzzle game where you teach a robot how to move crates. It features 36 fiendishly clever puzzles, haunting music and stunning retina graphics. Built with Codea Cargo-Bot is the first game on the App Store developed using Codea, an iPad app for rapidly creating games and simulations. Get Codea on the App Store. Cargo-Bot was developed by Rui Viana using Codea. Fred Bogg coded the entire music engine using Codea's sound API, as well as composing the Cargo-Bot score. Teach Your Kids to Code: 6 Beginner's Resources for Parents Introducing computer programming to your kids can be a challenge, especially for those who aren’t familiar with the nuances of code. Fortunately, in the last few years, a number of apps, software, and guides have been produced that make the often-complex subject of computer coding easy to grasp for young learners. So where to begin? These are a few resources that parents can share with their kids to help them start learning about programming. Programming Tutorials From Made With Code by Google: Google's Made With Code project has a mission of encouraging girls to pursue careers in computer science. Inspiring Articles About Kids Learning to Code Still looking for some ideas? Coding Organizations for Kids For the non-coding parents, it can be difficult to know where to begin.

Give Your Kids a Most Excellent Summer Coding Adventure | EdSurge Guides For a new generation of students growing up in a digitally-connected century, all roads lead to code. Coding is the new literacy. It will not replace foreign languages, but it will be the global vernacular for understanding how technologies work. Unlike the Trix cereal, coding and computer science aren't just for kids. We all read to our children from a young age and encourage them to write. Not every coding job involves working in a blue chip tech company or Silicon Valley startup. And contrary to public perception, learning to code doesn't necessarily require hammering away at a keyboard, eyes affixed on some text editor. In this collection of articles below we share different perspectives on coding movement. It's summertime...and the coding’s easy.

SNAP! (Build Your Own Blocks) Learn To Code, Code To Learn Is it important for all children to learn how to write? After all, very few children grow up to become journalists, novelists, or professional writers. So why should everyone learn to write? Of course, such questions seem silly. I see coding (computer programming) as an extension of writing. The recent surge of interest in learning to code, reflected in sites like codecademy.com and code.org, has focused especially on job and career opportunities. But I see much deeper and broader reasons for learning to code. Six years ago, my research group at the MIT Media Lab launched the Scratch programming language and online community in an effort to make coding accessible and appealing to everyone. We’ve been amazed with the diversity and creativity of the projects. As an example, let me describe some of the projects created by a young Scratcher who I’ll call BlueSaturn. As she worked on the Christmas card, BlueSaturn realized that what she enjoyed most was creating animated characters.

Game Design 2015 Hi! We are from Tower Hill and we are the Digital Game Design (CodeMasters) class of 2014-2015! This year we worked on projects involving different code languages, primarily Javascript and HTML (which this website is using). Some projects include the making of Java based Tic-Tac toe game to a fully functioning clicker game. Please check out our webpage and our projects (please see warning and liability below) Scratch Games Khan Games You can visit our first semester projects at... Ratbait Studios

7 Apps for Teaching Children Coding Skills It's hard to imagine a single career that doesn't have a need for someone who can code. Everything that "just works" has some type of code that makes it run. Coding (a.k.a. programming) is all around us. That's why all the cool kids are coding . . . or should be. Programming is not just the province of pale twenty-somethings in skinny jeans, hunched over three monitors, swigging Red Bull. Not any more! If you're concerned that that a) elementary school students don't have the ability to code, b) there's no room in the curriculum, and c) you don't possess coding chops to teach programming skills, throw out those worries. In no particular order, we have listed all the coding apps that are appropriate for young learners. GameStar Mechanic Platform: WebCost: $2 per student GameStar Mechanic teaches kids, ages 7-14, to design their own video games. Scratch Platform: WebCost: Free! Tynker Platform: WebCost: Free! Move the Turtle Hopscotch Platform: iPadCost: Free! Daisy the Dinosaur Cargo-Bot

Teaching Coding: Where Do You Start? EdSurge Newsletters Receive weekly emails on edtech products, companies, and events that matter. Soon after I wrote my last article on Edsurge “Where Does Tech-ed Belong in Edtech?,” advocating for the need for computer science education, there was a surprising amount of activity in this area--from President Obama’s interview to the much talked about Code.org video. Now that we are warming up to the idea that we must teach computer science or programming or “coding” in our schools, the next question is “Where do you start?” The advocacy channels and computer science organizations (CSTA, NCWIT, CSEdWeek, Code.org) give a number of helpful links to curriculum guides, tools, online programming courses and much more. I decided to look for a starting point based on what I have seen work again and again in my programming classes. While searching for this answer, I realized that it was actually obvious. So to answer the question ‘Where do you start?’ Go on...go type: forward 50 Did the turtle move?

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