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30 Tools to Flip Your Classroom From edshelf

30 Tools to Flip Your Classroom From edshelf
by edshelf: Reviews & recommendations of tools for education Jake Duncan is technology integration specialist at Region 6 Education Service Center and actively curates tools for educators on edshelf. He also blogs regularly on technology and education. Here are a set of websites, mobile apps, and desktop applications that can be used to create a flipped classroom environment. It includes standbys like Camtasia and Jing, two desktop apps for creating videos, as well as newcomers like Educreations, ShowMe, and Knowmia Teach to help you create instructional videos on iPads. Jake also suggests other helpful nuggets, including the screen-sharer ScreenChomp, remote desktop controller Doceri, SMS messenger Celly, and the free social network Sophia. What tools do you use for your flipped classroom? 30 Flipped Classroom Tools From edshelf Image attribution flickr user audiolucistore

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The 10 best classroom tools for gathering feedback Getting feedback from your students can serve multiple purposes: it can help you understand your students’ comprehension of the material, it can give you insight into what teaching methods work or don’t work, and it can help engage students in their learning process by knowing they have a voice that is heard. Not only can feedback offer insight for both teachers and students, it can be an integral part of group work and classroom time, given the plethora of connected devices in the hands of our students these days. That said, there are a lot of classroom tools available for gathering feedback. You can poll students or have them create a survey for a project, use clickers and other classroom response type tools in real time, get feedback on teaching methods, and more.

7 Must-Have Tools For The Flipped Classroom 7 Must-Have Tools For The Flipped Classroom by first appeared on gettingsmart.com The flipped classroom uses technology to allow students more time to apply knowledge and teachers more time for hands-on education. It’s a continually changing strategy that evolves with technology. The Teacher's Guide To Flipped Classrooms Since Jonathan Bergman and Aaron Sams first experimented with the idea in their Colorado classrooms in 2004, flipped learning has exploded onto the larger educational scene. It’s been one of the hottest topics in education for several years running and doesn’t seem to be losing steam. Basically, it all started when Bergman and Sams first came across a technology that makes it easy to record videos. They had a lot of students that regularly missed class and saw an opportunity to make sure that missing class didn’t mean missing out on the lessons.

Mobile Learning Resources - Flipped Classrooms Try Wikispaces Classroom now. Brand new from Wikispaces. guest 10 Free Resources for Flipping Your Classroom Thanks to the folks over at Khan Academy, alternative modes of delivering classroom instruction are all the rage. We’ve got face to face models, labs, rotations, online-only, self-blend, and of course, flipped. While there are numerous ways to implement a flipped classroom, the basic components include some form of prerecorded lectures that are then followed by in-class work. Flipped classrooms are heralded for many reasons. For one thing, students can learn at their own pace when they’re watching lectures at home. Viewing recorded lessons allows students to rewind and watch content again, fast forward through previously learned material, and pause and reflect on new material.

The Flipped Learning Process Visually Explained April 2, 2015 After yesterday’s post on “Flipped Learning Resources” one of our readers emailed us this beautiful visual outlining the six main steps involved in the creation of a flipped classroom. These steps include: planning, recording, sharing, changing, grouping, and regrouping. Read the graphic for more details on each of these steps. As a refresher for those who are not yet familiar with the concept of a flipped classroom. Flipped learning or Flipped classroom or is a methodology, an approach to learning in which technology is employed to reverse the traditional role of classroom time.

8 Overlooked Useful YouTube Tools When most people think about YouTube they think sharing videos and or about all of the videos they can discover. Most people don't think about the useful editing tools that are built into YouTube. The YouTube video editor has some useful features for teachers and students. 1. Create photo slideshows. The 10 Best Web Tools For Flipped Classrooms While flipping the classroom is still one of the hottest trends in education, it’s got nothing on time-saving and downright useful apps and web tools. In an effort to provide a quick look at some of the best web tools for flipped classrooms, I thought it would be useful to poll the @Edudemic Twitter followers . POLL: What are your favorite apps and tools for flipped classrooms?

The Best Tools and Apps for Flipped Learning Classroom July 25, 2014 Following the posting of "Managing iPad Videos in Schools" somebody emailed me asking about some suggestions for tools and apps to create instructional videos to use in a flipped learning setting. In fact, over the last couple of years I have reviewed several web tools and iPad apps that can be used in flipped classroom but the ones I am featuring below are among the best out there. 1- Educlipper Educlipper is a wonderful tool for creating video tutorials and guides to share with students. The Flipped Classroom Model: A Full Picture Due to Khan Academy’s popularity, the idea of the flipped classroom has gained press and credibility within education circles. Briefly, the Flipped Classroom as described by Jonathan Martin is: Flip your instruction so that students watch and listen to your lectures… for homework, and then use your precious class-time for what previously, often, was done in homework: tackling difficult problems, working in groups, researching, collaborating, crafting and creating. Classrooms become laboratories or studios, and yet content delivery is preserved. Flip your instruction so that students watch and listen to your lectures… for homework, and then use your precious class-time for what previously, often, was done in homework: tackling difficult problems, working in groups, researching, collaborating, crafting and creating.

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