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7 Characteristics Of Teachers Who Effectively Use Technology

7 Characteristics Of Teachers Who Effectively Use Technology
7 Characteristics Of Teachers Who Effectively Use Technology by TeachThought Staff Ed note: This post has been updated with an updated visual from Sylvia Duckworth, who took our graphic from alwaysprepped.com (now getalma) post and created the above visual. It is also sporting a new title, as the “habits of” is a trademarked term. As such, the new graphic and phrasing appears below. You can also see Sylvia’s tutorial on sketchnotes here. In most ways, teachers that use technology in the classroom aren’t much different than those that don’t. Any teacher worth their salt assesses, and then revises planned instruction based on data from those assessments. They manage their classroom in a way that works for them, create a positive learning environment, and (great teachers especially) collaborate with a variety of stakeholders to make sure every humanly possible attempt is made to meet all students need. 7 Characteristics Of Teachers Who Effectively Use Technology 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Related:  Good sitessmarkiewicz

All Things Topics - Home Free iPad Apps to Teach Current Events My students use their iPads as creators every day, whether they are recording their thoughts, using virtual tools or publishing authentic assessments. Content can be both created and consumed using an iPad, and my students take on both roles. There are abundant resources for content consumption, and these apps can be used to teach current events. Many schools are increasing their use of informational and multimedia texts in order to align their instruction to the Common Core Learning Standards. It's important to acknowledge that current events are more than just articles in a newspaper. There are a variety of free iPad apps that students and teachers can use to access high-interest texts and video clips that will connect your classroom to the world. Watchup This app is in my top ten for personal use, and it has a clear place in your classroom. SnagFilms There are lots of ways to introduce current events into your classroom, and documentary films can be a powerful tool. NBC Nightly News

The 21st century pedagogy teachers should be aware of Interpersonal learning , personalized learning, second life learning , 3d learning, collaborative learning and virtual learning , these are just some of the few buzz words you would be be reading so often in today’s educational literature. Things have changed , old methods and pedagogies are no longer relevant. The teacher-controlled learning where pre-constructed information is presented in a formal and standardized classroom settings becomes very obsolete. The urgent questions we should , as educators , ask ourselves are : what are the driving factors behind this huge transformation in learning ? and Do we need a new pedagogy to better enhance learning ? Advancements in technology and particularly social networking technologies are changing the whole educational framework . It is evident now that we are in front of two different versions of learner one is labeleed the the 20th century learning and the second is called the 21st century learning. 20th century and 21st century teachers

The Best Ideas For Using Games In The ESL/EFL/ELL Classroom I have many “Best” lists related to using online games with English Language Learners, and you can find them all at A Collection Of “The Best…” Lists On Learning Games. I’ve also written a lot and published a number of posts and resources related to playing non-online games in the classroom, but just realized I had never brought them all together in one place. Here they are (feel free to offer more suggestions!): Here are two excerpts from our book on teaching ELLs: Using Games in the ELL Classroom, Part I Using Games in the ELL Classroom, Part II Awhile back, I invited ESL teachers to send in their favorite games and posted them: The Best Language Learning Games (That Are Not Online) In Pursuit of the Excellent Game is an excellent piece from TESOL on using games with ELL’s. Articles on TEFL games is by Alex Case. Humanising Language Teaching is one of my favorite online journals, and they’ve just published the newest issue. A homemade revision game is by Sandy Millin. This Is Wild! Kaboom!

17 Free Tools for Creating Screen Capture Images and Videos When you're trying to teach people how to do something new on their computers having screencast videos or annotated screen capture images can be invaluable to you and the people you're trying to help. Here are some free tools that you can use to create screen capture videos and images. Vessenger, producers of a group messaging system, offers a free program for capturing and annotating images on your computer screen. Using the print screen key on your PC or "command+shift+4" on your Mac are easy ways to create a screen capture. Monosnap is a new, free screen capture tool for Mac and Windows. Szoter is a free online tool for annotating images that are stored on your computer. Explain and Send is a free Chrome extension that I have just installed in my browser. Pixlr offers a large set of image creation and editing tools. Screenr is a very simple, easy-to-use tool for creating screencast videos. Screen Castle is a simple screencast creation tool that is completely web-based.

Teachers And Social Media: Finding Your Comfort Zone by Dawn Casey-Rowe, Social Studies & Educational Technology Teacher Teachers And Social Media: Finding Your Comfort Zone “You’re a teacher. You shouldn’t blog.” My friend was serious–and concerned. Social media has the potential to strike fear in the hearts of many educators. As more and more teachers reach out in the public sphere, they wonder if this leaves them overexposed, and if so, the best practices that they should use. “Well,” I reply, “I want them to use my Learnist boards, and there’s nothing I wouldn’t say in public on my blog, though I’m not sure the topics are of interest to them. The payoffs are huge. I now have a PLN, (Professional Learning Network) of national experts in education, tech, writing, blogging, social media, sustainability–any interest I develop. If you’re just jumping into social media, you might appreciate the following Learnist resources. Teachers & Social Media: 6 Resources For Finding Your Comfort Zone 1. 2. 3. 4. 21st Century Leaders: Connected Principals

ESL Plans EFLWeb (English as a Foreign Language Magazine). EFLWeb is an on-line magazine for those teaching and learning English as a Foreign Language. Includes articles, Web resources, information on books and software, product reviews, events and conferences and more. ELT Newsletter. Teachers of ESL and EFL can read weekly articles on topics of interest, gather teaching tips from the weekly articles, discuss their thoughts on anything to do with English Language Teaching in the ELT Forum, find links to other sites of interest to English teachers (and learners) and submit articles to for publication here in their weekly column. English as a Second Language. English Forum. English Grammar Links for ESL Students. English Grammar Online. EnglishLearner.Com. English Programs Around the World. English Second Language Resources. English Teacher's Assistant. ESL Emporium A Public Service for Learners of English. ESL Hub. ESL-Lounge. ESL Online Catalog: ESL Software. ESL Standards for Pre-K-12 Students.

iPad Curriculum Google Forms for Teachers- A Must Read Guide In today's post, we are sharing with you one of the best and simplest guides I have ever read on Google Forms. This visual tutorial is created by Eric Curts and covers a wide range of tips and tricks on anything you need to know about Google Forms. Check it out and, as usual, your feedback is most welcome. Enjoy Here is a cursory look on the table of content of this guide : What is Google Forms? ESL without Photocopies 4 Stages: The Integration Of Technology In Learning The 4 Stages Of The Integration Of Technology In Learning by Terry Heick For professional development around this idea or others you read about on TeachThought, contact us. Technology can be used in the learning process in a variety of ways. Some are supplementary, serving the original design of the classroom and usually automate some previously by-human task or process–grading multiple choice assessments, searching for a source of information, or sharing messages and other data across large groups. But fully integrated and embedded in the learning process, technology can be transformative–and disruptive. Scaffolding the learning of anything unfamiliar–somehow–is a way of supporting the learner and setting them up for long-term independent success. Should elementary school be stage 1, middle school stage 2, and so on? Should all learners begin a school year at stage 1 and move as far as they can towards stage 4? Can a planned learning experience be evaluated using this framework in mind?

S.O.S. for Information Literacy English Grammar Online - free exercises, explanations, vocabulary, dictionary and teaching materials The Evolution of Classroom Technology Classrooms have come a long way. There’s been an exponential growth in educational technology advancement over the past few years. From overhead projectors to iPads, it’s important to understand not only what’s coming next but also where it all started. We’ve certainly come a long way but some things seem hauntingly similar to many years ago. For example, Thomas Edison said in 1925 that “books will soon be obsolete in schools. Also in 1925, there were “schools of the air” that delivered lessons to millions of students simultaneously. Here’s a brief look at the evolution of classroom technology. c. 1650 – The Horn-Book Wooden paddles with printed lessons were popular in the colonial era. c. 1850 – 1870 – Ferule This is a pointer and also a corporal punishment device. 1870 – Magic Lantern The precursor to a slide projector, the ‘magic lantern’ projected images printed on glass plates and showed them in darkened rooms to students. c. 1890 – School Slate c. 1890 – Chalkboard c. 1900 – Pencil B.

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