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Project Wordsworth

Project Wordsworth
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Spraktrollet: Listening Here you will find good exercises to improve your listening skills. Prismatic Google Adds Waze's Crowdsourced Traffic Data to Apps Google Maps is already using data from its newly-acquired mapping service Waze to give users access to crowdsourced traffic reports and satellite imagery. Just two months after Google bought Waze for a reported $1.03 billion, it was announced on Tuesday that the two companies are already sharing data. From details about traffic jams and accidents to construction and road closures, Google Maps users can now submit traffic-related information to the app. SEE ALSO: 4 Reasons Google Bought Waze This feature, which has already been made popular by Waze, will be updated in real time.

13 ways to create compelling characters 1. Make the character exceptional at something. Give your character a trait or skill that makes him or her admirable in some way. It doesn’t have to be anything over-the-top. Maybe she’s an office manager…who is an amazing cook. Maybe he’s a rebellious teenager…who is unusually perceptive. As soon as that character is really good at something, the reader perks up. 2. This is so effective that screenwriters often use a “save the cat” scene (and the better the screenwriter, the subtler the scene) near the beginning of the screenplay to make the audience like and identify with the character. As soon as you show the character genuinely caring about the world, the reader starts to care. 3. Hands-down, one of the best pieces of writing advice I’ve ever received in my life. 4. I’m not talking about dialect or verbal tics or anything gimmicky. 5. Your characters might exist for the sake of the story…but you need to create the illusion that they don’t. 6. Passionate people are interesting. 7. 8. 9.

Supporting Student Comprehension in Content Area Reading Our lesson plans are written and reviewed by educators using current research and the best instructional practices and are aligned to state and national standards. Choose from hundreds of topics and strategies. More Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals. More Teacher Resources by Grade Home › Professional Development › Strategy Guides Strategy Guide Oftentimes, the support students get with a content area reading task is a list of questions to answer or terms to define. Offering students meaningful ways to respond to and make sense of what they’re reading can go a long way toward getting students to read with engagement and confidence. While all of these strategies enhance the possibility for meaningful engagement with text, none of them is likely to happen on its own.

Socialising 4: Active listening Perhaps the most important skill connected with socialising is to ‘shut up and listen’. In practice, it can be very difficult to resist the temptation to turn every conversation into a conversation about what we consider the most interesting thing in the world, i.e. ourselves. The most skilful active listeners include nurses, social workers, psychotherapists and counsellors, so this lesson focuses especially on the techniques studied and used by these professionals. Topic: Socialising and active listening Level: Intermediate (B2) and above Aims: To raise awareness of the importance of active listening skills, and some situations where they are especially important.To teach some language and techniques for active listening, including effective use of body language.To provide practice and feedback of the situation of actively listening to a friend or colleague talking about a difficult experience. Plan components Lesson plan: download Worksheets: download Copyright - please read

8 Pinterest Alternatives You May Not Know About Pinterest has garnered a reputation (whether incidentally or intentionally) as a website geared mostly towards females who need ideas for weddings, home décor, and recreation. Maybe you like the idea of Pinterest but not its subject matter. Maybe Pinterest just isn’t for you. Yes, there is. Juxtapost Juxtapost is a Pinterest knockoff but in a good way. The feature I like best in Juxtapost is the “More Like This” button. Use Juxtapost if you want to use a Pinterest-like site with many of the same features but presented in a different way. We Heart It If I had to describe We Heart It in one sentence, I’d call it the baby of Pinterest and Tumblr, and I don’t necessarily mean that in a bad way. There’s an undercurrent beneath all of the We Heart It posts which indicates that this site is mainly used by teens and college girls. Dribbble According to Dribbble’s homepage, “Dribbble is show and tell for designers“. Not a designer yourself? FoodGawker Are you a foodie? Liqurious Manteresting Dudepins

Creating Stunning Character Arcs, Pt. 1: Can You Structure Characters? What if there were a sure-fire secret to creating stunning character arcs? Would you be interested in discovering it? If you care about connecting with readers, grabbing hold of their emotions, and creating stories that will resonate with them on a level deeper than mere entertainment, then the answer has to be a resounding yes! But here’s the thing about character arcs: they’re way too easy to take for granted. 1. 2. 3. That’s character arc in a nutshell. Turns out: a lot. (Featured in the Structuring Your Novel Workbook.) The Link Between Character Arcs and Story Structure Too often, character and plot are viewed as separate entities—to the point that we often pit them against each other, trying to determine which is more important. We often think of plot as being about structure, but our notions of character and character arc tend toward the more airy-fairy. Surely, right? Wrong, actually. The three acts of the [story] correspond to the three stages of the hero’s outer motivation.

ereadingworksheets | Free Reading Worksheets Listening Welcome to EnglishClub Listening, to help you learn the skill of listening in English. Listening is the first of the four language skills, which are: 1. Listening 2. Speaking 3. Reading 4. Writing What Is Listening? How to Hear English Everywhere How can you hear English when you're not in an English-speaking country? Dictation Do you want to improve your English listening skills? Listen to English by Radio Listen to English online with programmes from stations like the BBC or Voice of America. Listen to the News Listen to our weekly digest of the news in English. Listen to Poetry in English Some classic pieces of poetry and other texts for you to listen to and read. Podcasts You can listen online or download these readings, many of which come with transcript and wordchecker to explain vocabulary. Improve your listening with MyEC! MyEnglishClub features thousands of videos and songs for English learners. This Week in History Listen to a new story every Monday. English Listening Links Taking a Tour

Patatap English 50 Exercises for Story Writers English 50 – Intro to Creative Writing: Exercises for Story Writers Basic Theory: What is a short story? As soon as someone delivers a definition, some good writer will write a story that proves the theory wrong. About the only thing we can say for sure is that short stories are short and that they are written in what we call prose. Short stories have a narrator; that is, someone tells the story; have at least one character in them; have some action occur (or perhaps fails to occur); take place somewhere; that is, there is a setting for the action; and someone either learns something or fails to learn something (theme).With these five characteristics in mind, we can create an almost endless supply of exercises to help sharpen our techniques of story telling. Narrative Voice Twenty or so years ago, voice was the "rite of passage" into a successful writing career. NOTE: It is quite common for writers in the early stages of their careers to imitate the writers they are reading or admire most.

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