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 News, Non-fiction, Documentary in the 3D virtual space

 News, Non-fiction, Documentary in the 3D virtual space

http://www.immersivejournalism.com/

Related:  Le futur...Web Journalisme : médias immersifsRealidad Virtual

Virtual reality is journalism's next frontier Gannett Digital/Des Moines Register Virtual reality is ascendant, and it’s time for media outlets to take notice. Why? The Storyteller’s Guide to the Virtual Reality Audience — Stanford d.school Thank You The extended team: Paisley Smith, Judeth Oden Choi, Alexandra Garcia, Amy Santamaria, Joseph Lim, Maya Hawke and Emily Goligoski. As well as the test participants & actors. Our partners: Tran Ha and Stanford’s d.school Media Experiments; Vincent McCurley, Milan Koerner-Safrata, Paisley Smith, Janine Steele, Loc Dao, from NFB Interactive.

Virtual Strangers – Leap Motion Gallery This virtual reality app requires the use of an HTC Vive or Oculus Rift, a mounted Leap Motion Controller (using the VR Developer Mount or unofficial alternative), and the Leap Motion Orion software. Virtual Strangers puts two complete strangers, from anywhere in the world, into a shared virtual space and gives them the ability to talk to each other, create drawings together, and scale them to mind-bending sizes. This project was featured at the 2016 Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) as part of The Verge’s summer series POP, which explores all facets of VR storytelling. By Mike Harris & Alec Slayden

Towards a VR Manifesto – Immerse I love manifestos. In her article, Janet spells out the beginnings of a manifesto for VR. I appreciate how polite she is, compared to, say, Lars Von Trier’s Dogme Rules for film 20 years ago. Unlike Lars, Janet starts every one of her rules with “please.” So I’m 100 with Janet on the Empathy question. Not a Film and Not an Empathy Machine – Immerse With the arrival of the first generation of consumer headsets, virtual reality has produced a wealth of exploratory projects from a diverse group of very talented practitioners including game designers, animators, documentary journalists, Hollywood filmmakers, social activists, university researchers, and visual artists. Most of what these adventurous folks (myself and my students included) are producing is terrible, which is just as it should be. Expanding human expressivity into new formats and genres is culturally valuable but difficult work.

Towards a VR Manifesto – Immerse I love manifestos. In her article, Janet spells out the beginnings of a manifesto for VR. I appreciate how polite she is, compared to, say, Lars Von Trier’s Dogme Rules for film 20 years ago. Unlike Lars, Janet starts every one of her rules with “please.” So I’m 100 with Janet on the Empathy question. VR is not film. So what is it? – Immerse I’m grateful to Janet Murray for reminding us that, at least when it comes to media, we tend to back into the future. We have a habit of taking what we already know and projecting it onto the next shiny new thing coming down the technological highway. Just as film’s pioneers spent their first decade emulating theater, many of today’s VR makers are doing their best to emulate the logic of film. And just as early filmmakers finally shattered the proscenium arch and evolved new vocabularies, we can expect VR’s makers to find robust, exploration-based alternatives to the still-dominant film paradigm of carefully composed frames, editing strategies and fades to black.

Creation, curation and community: How the Seattle Times restructured to ensure survival Back in 2009 the Seattle Times was reported as being in a "dire position". Time magazine reported sources at the time who said that even in the face of the closure of competitor newspaper the Post Intelligencer, which moved online-only, the future of the Seattle Times was far from certain. But today, three years later, the newspaper has more than doubled web traffic, raised the cover price by 40 per cent and seen circulation revenue grow. So how did it get here? Towards a VR Manifesto – Immerse I love manifestos. In her article, Janet spells out the beginnings of a manifesto for VR. I appreciate how polite she is, compared to, say, Lars Von Trier’s Dogme Rules for film 20 years ago. Standouts in Tech: Drones, Virtual Reality, Instant Translation and A.I. Photo LOTS of cool new technology products come out every year, but usually only a few stand out. These few, though, are often mind-bending — they alter your perspective of what’s possible in the future. There were four such technologies for me in 2014:

VR is not film. So what is it? – Immerse I’m grateful to Janet Murray for reminding us that, at least when it comes to media, we tend to back into the future. We have a habit of taking what we already know and projecting it onto the next shiny new thing coming down the technological highway. Just as film’s pioneers spent their first decade emulating theater, many of today’s VR makers are doing their best to emulate the logic of film. And just as early filmmakers finally shattered the proscenium arch and evolved new vocabularies, we can expect VR’s makers to find robust, exploration-based alternatives to the still-dominant film paradigm of carefully composed frames, editing strategies and fades to black. VR is not film.

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