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Learn To Code, Code To Learn

Learn To Code, Code To Learn
Is it important for all children to learn how to write? After all, very few children grow up to become journalists, novelists, or professional writers. So why should everyone learn to write? Of course, such questions seem silly. People use writing in all parts of their lives: to send birthday messages to friends, to jot down shopping lists, to record personal feelings in diaries. The act of writing also engages people in new ways of thinking. I see coding (computer programming) as an extension of writing. The recent surge of interest in learning to code, reflected in sites like codecademy.com and code.org, has focused especially on job and career opportunities. But I see much deeper and broader reasons for learning to code. Six years ago, my research group at the MIT Media Lab launched the Scratch programming language and online community in an effort to make coding accessible and appealing to everyone. We’ve been amazed with the diversity and creativity of the projects.

https://www.edsurge.com/n/2013-05-08-learn-to-code-code-to-learn

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Digital Literacy Standard Curriculum Version 2 Updated: October 1, 2007 The Digital Literacy Standard Curriculum Version 2 consists of five courses: Computer Basics Teaching Coding: Where Do You Start? EdSurge Newsletters Receive weekly emails on edtech products, companies, and events that matter. Soon after I wrote my last article on Edsurge “Where Does Tech-ed Belong in Edtech?,” advocating for the need for computer science education, there was a surprising amount of activity in this area--from President Obama’s interview to the much talked about Code.org video. The timing of my article was purely coincidence, though I wish I could say otherwise! Now that we are warming up to the idea that we must teach computer science or programming or “coding” in our schools, the next question is “Where do you start?”

Teaching Kids to Code Every era demands--and rewards--different skills. In different times and different places, we have taught our children to grow vegetables, build a house, forge a sword or blow a delicate glass, bake bread, create a soufflé, write a story or shoot hoops. Now we are teaching them to code. We are teaching them to code, however, not so much as an end in itself but because our world has morphed: so many of the things we once did with elements such as fire and iron, or tools such as pencil and paper, are now wrought in code.

How to Integrate Technology When technology integration in the classroom is seamless and thoughtful, students not only become more engaged, they begin to take more control over their own learning, too. Effective tech integration changes classroom dynamics, encouraging student-centered project-based learning. Think about how you are using technology with your students. Are they employing technology daily in the classroom, using a variety of tools to complete assignments and create projects that show a deep understanding of content? If your answer is "No," is it because you lack enough access to technology? Is it because you don't feel ready?

Teach Your Kids to Code: 6 Beginner's Resources for Parents Introducing computer programming to your kids can be a challenge, especially for those who aren’t familiar with the nuances of code. Fortunately, in the last few years, a number of apps, software, and guides have been produced that make the often-complex subject of computer coding easy to grasp for young learners. So where to begin? How to Teach Computing: An Introduction to Concepts, Tools and Resources for Secondary Teachers "Coding is like the new literacy!" Neelie Kroes, Vice President of the European Commission. Annoyed of students being distracted by their mobile phones? Tired of seeing students falling asleep after a night of gaming? Let's turn our students from passive consumers of technology into active producers of technology. Let's get them to develop apps, design games and start their own websites.

To Attract More Girls to STEM, Bring More Storytelling to Science A student from High Technology High School in Lincroft, New Jersey CREDIT: Marissa Hazel Guest Post by Jonathan Olsen and Sarah Gross, teachers at High Technology High School in Lincroft, New Jersey Women and girls are historically underrepresented in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) fields and much has been written lately about why girls in school seem disinterested in these areas. 'Coding Nation' Chronicles 300 Ways to Pick Up Programming EdSurge Newsletters Receive weekly emails on edtech products, companies, and events that matter. How many ways can you learn to code? Try more than 100101100--or, in translation, more than 300. That's according to a report, "Coding Nation," fresh from the digital press at the Kapor Center for Social Impact.

Sebran's ABC - free software for kids It's never too early for your child to become familiar with letters and numbers. Sebran's ABC's colorful pictures, pleasant music, and gentle games teach letters, numbers, simple math, and rudiments of reading. The program teaches using either Afrikaans, Bahasa Indonesian, Breton, Catalan, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Estonian, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Icelandic, Italian, Lithuanian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Samoan, Slovak, Slovenian, Spanish, Turkish, Swahili or Swedish (in Swedish, the droll zebra gracing the main screen is called "sebran"). The six simpler exercises display four possible answers. Choose the right one and it becomes a smile; an error gets a frown and a chance to try again.

7 Apps for Teaching Children Coding Skills It's hard to imagine a single career that doesn't have a need for someone who can code. Everything that "just works" has some type of code that makes it run. Coding (a.k.a. programming) is all around us. That's why all the cool kids are coding . . . or should be. 5 Unbeatable Reasons Your Kid Should Be Coding In a world driven by technology, the ability to understand and command computers puts you in the driver’s seat. Look around and you’ll find the most successful CEOs today are armed with the skill. Be it Zuckerber or Gates. Coding empowers kids to communicate with the machines and acquire the ability to turn creativity into interactive reality. The computer language like any other language is best learnt at a young age.

15+ Ways of Teaching Every Student to Code (Even Without a Computer) According to Code.org, 90 percent of parents in the U.S. want their children to learn computer science—it will be crucial for many jobs in the near future—but only 40 percent of schools teach it. Critics claim that it is mainly the more affluent schools that offer computer science courses, thus denying those who attend poorer schools the chance to learn necessary skills. A focus on STEM is not enough: Code.org also reports that while 70 percent of new STEM jobs are in computing, only 7 percent of STEM graduates are in computer science. It is imperative that savvy schools begin to focus some STEM resources on computer science and programming.

Should every school class be a computer coding class? This spring, at St. Anne’s-Belfield School in Charlottesville, Virginia, the fifth-grade Spanish class programmed computers to produce bilingual, animated photo albums. The seventh-grade science class rejiggered the code behind climate models. The first-graders programmed robots to run mazes. And that’s just for starters. “We’d like everybody to be more comfortable with computer science, because it’s running our lives now, and because it enhances what’s possible in the classroom,” said Kim Wilkens, a technology teacher at St.

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