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Awesome Chart on " Pedagogy Vs Andragogy "

Awesome Chart on " Pedagogy Vs Andragogy "
Adult learning is a vast area of educational research and probably one of the most complicated. Adults learn differently and have different strategies in learning. Adults Learning Theory and Principles explain in details these strategies and sheds more light on how adults cultivate knowledge. Talking about adult learning brings us to the concept of Andragogy. According to the article Malcolm Knowles an American practitioner and theorist of adult education, defined andragogy as “the art and science of helping adults learn”. Knowles identified the six principles of adult learning as: Adults are internally motivated and self-directedAdults bring life experiences and knowledge to learning experiencesAdults are goal orientedAdults are relevancy orientedAdults are practicalAdult learners like to be respected Tom Whitby wrote this great article " Pedagogy Vs Andragogy " in which he argued for using these same principles of adults learning in kids learning.

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/05/awesome-chart-on-pedagogy-vs-andragogy.html

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Social Media in Social Work Education - Social Work - Browse & Buy "The next generation of social services will rely on a backbone of new technology and confident, IT-savvy social care and health specialists." … I smiled as I read through my undergraduate dissertation this week. It was written many years ago and was about the internet, and its implications on social work practice. Yes, I was a geek even back then! So much has changed since I wrote it… but there were things that I wrote that are still topical today. One of the things that has taken off has been the advent of social media – such as Facebook, Twitter and many more. While the technology and the tools might be relatively new, the concept of social networking has been around much longer than the internet or even mass communication.

Training Teachers to Teach Critical Thinking How KIPP educators instruct their colleagues to enhance their classroom practice. KIPP King Collegiate High School principal Jason Singer trains his teachers to lead Socratic discussions (above); Katie Kirkpatrick (right), dean of instruction, developed a step-by-step framework -- described below -- for teaching students basic critical-thinking skills. Credit: Zachary Fink Thinking critically is one thing, but being able to teach it can be quite another. Katie Kirkpatrick, dean of instruction at KIPP King Collegiate High School, developed the school's Speech & Composition class, a requirement for all students. In the class, students learn basic critical-thinking skills.

Debunking the Genius Myth Picture a “genius” — you’ll probably conjure an image of an Einstein-like character, an older man in a rumpled suit, disorganized and distracted even as he, almost accidentally, stumbles upon his next “big idea.” In truth, the acclaimed scientist actually said, “It’s not that I’m so smart, it’s just that I stay with problems longer.” But the narrative around Einstein and a lot of accomplished geniuses — think Ben Franklin, the key and the bolt of lightning — tends to focus more on mind-blowing talent and less on the hard work behind the rise to success. A downside of the genius mythology results in many kids trudging through school believing that a great student is born, not made — lucky or unlucky, Einstein or Everyman.

Develop Lifelong Learners in One Step - Leadership 360 Among the most common phrases being used in classrooms, hallways, and mission statements these days often focuses on this one: Preparing Students To Be Lifelong Learners How are schools preparing children to become lifelong learners? In the early years, teachers try to model a love of reading and writing. Social media should be an essential part of new social workers’ toolkits From production and management of services to workforce development and community engagement strategy, local authorities and councillors are exploring the potential of digital media for co-production and enhancement of services. The fast pace of technology means greater and more powerful means of collaboration and transformation of services and the workforce. However, we also need to be aware of potential knowledge gaps that could affect both the workforce and the users of services.

How to measure the effectiveness of professional development activities This post on measurement on the effectiveness of professional development attracts my attention. Stephen commented in his OLDaily: And the good point he make is that the effectiveness (if you want to call it that) of a learning event isn’t measurable at the time of the event – you have to wait for the cycles to complete. Can the effectiveness of professional development be measured? Adult Learning Methods and Technology Skip to main content Adult Learning Methods and Technology Adult Learning Guide 21st Century Collaborative What’s different about this book? The Connected Educator is about Learner first, educator secondConnected Learning Communities – the next generation of professional learning communitiesDo It Yourself professional developmentBecoming a connected learner The time has come to reject incremental change and to radically transform education to fully prepare students for life in the 21st century.

The Web is 25 years old today – so how has it changed the way we learn? Updated: 15 April 2014 25 years ago today, on 12 March 1989, the British scientist Tim Berners-Lee wrote a proposal to develop a distributed information system for CERN, and in doing so lay down the foundation for what was to become the World Wide Web. In the ensuing 25 years there can be few people whose lives haven’t been influenced by the Web in some way or other. But how has it changed the way we learn? My own research (particular involving my Top 100 Tools for Learning survey over the last 7 years) has shown that many us are now learning very differently, but the most striking thing is that we are taking control of our own learning in ways not possible before. But more than this many of us are using social networks like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ to build a personal/professional network of trusted friends and colleagues.

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