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Easter

Easter
The last week of Lent is called Holy Week, and it contains the days of the Easter Triduum, including Maundy Thursday (also known as Holy Thursday), commemorating the Last Supper and its preceding foot washing,[8][9] as well as Good Friday, commemorating the crucifixion and death of Jesus.[10] Easter is followed by a fifty-day period called Eastertide, or the Easter Season, ending with Pentecost Sunday. Easter is a moveable feast, meaning it is not fixed in relation to the civil calendar. The First Council of Nicaea (325) established the date of Easter as the first Sunday after the full moon (the Paschal Full Moon) following the March equinox.[11] Ecclesiastically, the equinox is reckoned to be on 21 March (although the astronomical equinox occurs on 20 March in most years), and the "Full Moon" is not necessarily on the astronomically correct date. The date of Easter therefore varies from 22 March to 25 April inclusive. Etymology Theological significance In the early Church Date Computations Related:  Common connotations of YELLOW

Autumn Autumn, interchangeably known as fall in the US and Canada,[1] is one of the four temperate seasons. Autumn marks the transition from summer into winter, in September (Northern Hemisphere) or March (Southern Hemisphere) when the arrival of night becomes noticeably earlier and the temperature cools. One of its main features is the shedding of leaves from deciduous trees as they pave way for further growth. The equinoxes might be expected to be in the middle of their respective seasons, but temperature lag (caused by the thermal latency of the ground and sea) means that seasons appear later than dates calculated from a purely astronomical perspective. In North America, autumn is usually considered to start with the September equinox.[5] In traditional East Asian solar term, autumn starts on or around 8 August and ends on about 7 November. Etymology[edit] Autumn in suburban Canterbury, Victoria, Australia The alternative word fall for the season traces its origins to old Germanic languages.

Triduum Since the 1955 reform by Pope Pius XII, the Easter Triduum, including as it does Easter Sunday, has been more clearly distinguished as a separate liturgical period. Previously, all these celebrations were advanced by more than twelve hours. The Mass of the Lord's Supper and the Easter Vigil were celebrated in the morning of Thursday and Saturday respectively, and Holy Week and Lent were seen as ending only on the approach of Easter Sunday. After the Gloria in Excelsis Deo at the Mass of the Lord's Supper all church bells are silenced and the organ is not used. The period that lasted from Thursday morning to before Easter Sunday began was once, in Anglo-Saxon times, referred to as "the still days".[5] In the Catholic Church, weddings, which were once prohibited throughout the entire season of Lent and during certain other periods as well,[6] are prohibited during the Triduum. Maundy Thursday (also called Holy Thursday)[edit] Good Friday[edit] Holy Saturday[edit] Easter Sunday[edit] Holy Week

Lent Its institutional purpose is heightened in the annual commemoration of Holy Week, marking the death, burial and resurrection of Jesus, which recalls the tradition and events of the New Testament beginning on Friday of Sorrows, further climaxing on Jesus' crucifixion on Good Friday, which ultimately culminates in the joyful celebration on Easter Sunday of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ. During Lent, many of the faithful commit to fasting or giving up certain types of luxuries as a form of penitence. Many Christians also add a Lenten spiritual discipline, such as reading a daily devotional, to draw themselves near to God.[6] The Stations of the Cross, a devotional commemoration of Christ's carrying the Cross and of his execution, are often observed. Etymology[edit] In most Slavic languages the common name is simply a phrase meaning "fasting time" (as Czech postní doba) or "great fast" (as Russian великий пост vyeliki post or Polish wielki post). Duration[edit] Associated customs[edit]

Note 3 Easter Sunday - Church Days Easter Sunday is the celebration of the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. In Matthew 20:19, Jesus said, ‘Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be betrayed to the chief priests and to the scribes; and they will condemn him to death, and deliver him to the Gentiles to mock and to scourge and to crucify. And the third day he will rise again (NKJV).’ Jesus died on the day we commemorate as Good Friday. The day is celebrated by Christians across the globe at services, parades and feasts. Matthew 28:1-10 tells about the resurrection of Jesus. He Is Risen 5But the angel answered and said to the women, “Do not be afraid, for I know that you seek Jesus who was crucified. 6He is not here; for He is risen, as He said. 8So they went out quickly from the tomb with fear and great joy, and ran to bring His disciples word. The Women Worship the Risen Lord 9And as they went to tell His disciples, behold, Jesus met them, saying,“Rejoice!” Read more about Easter here.

Liberalism Liberalism is a political philosophy or worldview founded on ideas of liberty and equality.[1] Liberals espouse a wide array of views depending on their understanding of these principles, but generally they support ideas such as free and fair elections, civil rights, freedom of the press, freedom of religion, free trade, and private property.[2][3][4][5][6] Etymology and definition[edit] Words such as liberal, liberty, libertarian, and libertine all trace their history to the Latin liber, which means "free".[13] One of the first recorded instances of the word liberal occurs in 1375, when it was used to describe the liberal arts in the context of an education desirable for a free-born man.[13] The word's early connection with the classical education of a medieval university soon gave way to a proliferation of different denotations and connotations. History[edit] Beginnings[edit] Glorious Revolution[edit] Era of enlightenment[edit] American revolution[edit]

Triduum Easter Triduum The Easter Triduum begins on Holy Thursday with the evening Mass of the Lord's Supper, is continued through Good Friday with the celebration of the passion of the Lord on Holy Saturday, reaches its high point in the Easter vigil, and concludes with evening prayer on Easter Sunday. The Season of Lent ends on Thursday of Holy Week. Mass of the Lord's Supper On Holy Thursday we remember the Last Supper and that Jesus gave himself in the Eucharist. The evening Mass of the Lord's Supper on Holy Thursday is a beautiful and joyful celebration. Good Friday On Good Friday we remember the death of Jesus. Easter Vigil On Holy Saturday the Church meditates on the suffering and death of Jesus. The Easter Vigil has four parts: The Service of Light; the Liturgy of the Word; the Liturgy of Baptism; and the Liturgy of the Eucharist. During the Service of Light, all the lights in the church are turned off and a fire is prepared outside the church.

Maundy Thursday Maundy Thursday (also known as Holy Thursday, Covenant Thursday, Great and Holy Thursday, Sheer Thursday and Thursday of Mysteries) is the Christian feast, or holy day, falling on the Thursday before Easter. It commemorates the Maundy and Last Supper of Jesus Christ with the Apostles as described in the Canonical gospels.[1] It is the fifth day of Holy Week, and is preceded by Holy Wednesday and followed by Good Friday.[2] Names in English[edit] Washing of the Feet and the Last Supper, painting of Altar of Siena Cathedral in 14th century Use of the names "Maundy Thursday", "Holy Thursday", and the others is not evenly distributed. The Anglican Church uses the name "Maundy Thursday" in the Book of Common Prayer,[5] whereas it treats "Holy Thursday" as an alternative name for Ascension Day.[6][7] But outside of the official texts of the liturgy, Anglicans sometimes apply the name "Holy Thursday" to the day before Good Friday.[8] Derivation of the name "Maundy"[edit] Services[edit]

Good Friday Good Friday is a religious holiday, observed primarily by Christians, commemorating the crucifixion of Jesus Christ and his death at Calvary. The holiday is observed during Holy Week as part of the Paschal Triduum on the Friday preceding Easter Sunday, and may coincide with the Jewish observance of Passover. It is also known as Holy Friday, Great Friday, Black Friday,[1] or Easter Friday,[2][3][4] though the last term properly refers to the Friday in Easter week. Good Friday is a widely-instituted legal holiday in many national governments around the world, including in most Western countries as well as in 12 U.S. states. Some governments have laws prohibiting certain acts that are seen as contrasting the solemn nature of the day.[8][9] Etymology[edit] The etymology of the term "good" in the context of Good Friday is contested. Biblical accounts[edit] Conflicting testimony against Jesus was brought forth by many witnesses, to which Jesus answered nothing. In the Roman Catholic Church[edit]

Schools - Religion - Christianity Libertarianism Traditionally, libertarianism was a term for a form of left-wing politics; such left-libertarian ideologies seek to abolish capitalism and private ownership of the means of production, or else to restrict their purview or effects, in favor of common or cooperative ownership and management, viewing private property as a barrier to freedom and liberty.[6][7][8][9] In the United States, modern right-libertarian ideologies, such as minarchism and anarcho-capitalism, co-opted the term in the mid-20th century to instead advocate laissez-faire capitalism and strong private property rights, such as in land, infrastructure, and natural resources.[10][11][12] Etymology[edit] The 17 August 1860 edition of Le Libertaire: Journal du Mouvement Social, a libertarian communist publication in New York In the mid-1890s, Sébastien Faure began publishing a new Le Libertaire while France's Third Republic enacted the lois scélérates ("villainous laws"), which banned anarchist publications in France.

Triduum Meditations on the Triduum by Victor Hoagland, C.P. The Easter triduum, marking the days of Jesus’ passion and resurrection, is the most important time of the church year. It begins with the evening Mass of Holy Thursday, reaches its high point in the Easter Vigil, and closes on Easter Sunday evening. Prepared by the days of Lent, Christians celebrate on these holiest of days the saving work God has accomplished in Christ. From the events remembered these days, so sorrowful and so joyful, the church learns the deepest lessons. We have only to look and learn from Jesus Christ. These are days for fixing our eyes on the holy mystery of his cross and filling our ears with the words of his gospel. Holy Thursday Good Friday The Good Friday rites center around the reading of the Passion of Jesus. The Easter Vigil The Easter Vigil is the high point of the Easter triduum celebrating the passion and resurrection of Jesus. Light conquers darkness The vigil opens with a service of light. Rejoice!

The Sacred Triduum: Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Easter. The Mystery of Faith - Easter / Lent "Beginning with the Easter Triduum as its source of light, the new age of the Resurrection fills the whole liturgical year with its brilliance. Gradually, on either side of this source, the year is transfigured by the liturgy" (Catechism of the Catholic Church) . CHESAPEAKE, VA (Catholic Online) – The Easter Triduum begins with the Vigil of Holy Thursday. It marks the end of the forty days of Lent and the beginning of the three-day celebration of the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ - Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Easter Vigil/Easter Sunday. The Fathers of the Second Vatican Council reminded us of the extraordinary significance of the Triduum : "Christ redeemed us all and gave perfect glory to God principally through his paschal mystery: dying he destroyed our death and rising he restored our life. Therefore the Easter Triduum of the passion and resurrection of Christ is the culmination of the entire liturgical year."

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