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Back to Basics: Perfect Your Note-Taking Techniques

Back to Basics: Perfect Your Note-Taking Techniques
Related:  Self Actualisation

WannaLearn.com Here's Why, How, And What You Should Doodle To Boost Your Memory And Creativity Did your boss ever catch you covering an important memo with Escher-like scribbles? In high school, did your teacher call you out for drawing on the desk, your sneakers, your skin? Today, the doodle nay-sayers are being drowned out by a growing body of research and opinion that indicates that connects that seemingly distracted scribbling with greater info retention and creativity. "I can’t tell you how important it is to draw," says Sunni Brown, whose creative consultancy Sunni Brown Ink, teaches "applied visual thinking"— a.k.a doodling—to coders, designers, and even journalists. Why Doodle Studies have shown that doodling can free up short- and long-term memory, improve content retention and increase attention span. What To Doodle These Brown-recommended doodling exercises will help you rethink the familiar and make unexpected connections. "Atomization." "Game-Storming." "Process Map." When To Doodle A lesson or presentation is a particularly great time to doodle. Where To Doodle

CVs, cover letters and application forms - The University of Auckland Tailoring your CV Employers receive dozens, if not hundreds of applications from job seekers, so they are looking for individuals that stand out from the crowd. The most effective way to do this is to research the employer’s requirements and match them as closely as possible. Research each employer and their field carefully: refer to the job advertisement, job description, company website etc. Find out what the employer is looking for. This could include qualifications, experience and skills. Skills in your CV Identify your skillsGive relevant evidence of your skills (i.e. practical examples)Choose action words carefully to provide clear information to the employerEmphasise your achievements CV formatting

Hacking Knowledge: 77 Ways to Learn Faster, Deeper, and Better If someone granted you one wish, what do you imagine you would want out of life that you haven’t gotten yet? For many people, it would be self-improvement and knowledge. Newcounter knowledge is the backbone of society’s progress. Great thinkers such as Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Edison, Benjamin Franklin, Albert Einstein, and others’ quests for knowledge have led society to many of the marvels we enjoy today. Your quest for knowledge doesn’t have to be as Earth-changing as Einstein’s, but it can be an important part of your life, leading to a new job, better pay, a new hobby, or simply knowledge for knowledge’s sake — whatever is important to you as an end goal. Life-changing knowledge does typically require advanced learning techniques. Health Shake a leg. Balance Sleep on it. Perspective and Focus Change your focus, part 2. Recall Techniques Listen to music. Visual Aids Every picture tells a story. Verbal and Auditory Techniques Stimulate ideas. Kinesthetic Techniques Write, don’t type.

Visual thinking Visual thinking is a way to organize your thoughts and improve your ability to think and communicate. It’s a way to expand your range and capacity by going beyond the linear world of the written word, list and spreadsheet, and entering the non-linear world of complex spacial relationships, networks, maps and diagrams. It’s also about using tools — like pen and paper, index cards and software tools — to externalize your internal thinking processes, making them more clear, explicit and actionable. Why is visual thinking important? There’s more information at your fingertips than ever before, and yet people are overwhelmed by it. We think in pictures. Think you can’t draw? Squiggle birds (I learned squiggle birds from my friend Chris Glynn). So why is visual thinking important? The whirl. Visualization is increasingly used in business and science to simplify complexity: a picture is worth a thousand words. Drawing is a natural process for thinking, exploring ideas and learning. 1. 2. 3. 4.

Teaching with Ted TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design. It started out (in 1984) as a conference bringing together people from those three worlds. Since then its scope has become ever broader. The intent of this project wiki is to address: How can the TED talks be used as springboards for further discourse, exploration, reflection, and action? The wiki was initiated independently of TED by Jackie Gerstein, but the TED team in New York know about it and are excited by its potential. The individual pages (see sidebar) not only contain the original TED talks, but also additional references, resources, and activities about the topic and/or speaker. Why study TED? The collection of all these leaders in different fields means you will learn of things you have never considered within your immediate realm. talks provide an opportunity to share something that’s not our own and opportunity to rethink what we and our colleagues do, publicly. Who owns TED

How to become smarter by doing less in the information age | The Uncommon Life by Kent Healy Common: Believing that focusing on detail is the only and best path to success. Uncommon: Let’s be honest: Most things studied in college are quickly forgotten. I believe this is partly due to the sheer number of concepts addressed per class, per semester. In my experience, the emphasis is often on breadth versus depth. This poses a challenge to students studying for comprehensive tests. I know; I’ve been there many times. But I didn’t have the “luxury” of making the library my second home to spend hours on rote memorization. The eclipsing effect of detail: Traditional college advice places an extremely high level of importance on detail, but this train of thought can be a hindrance, at times resulting in increased stress and workload. An extreme focus on detail limits one’s ability to grasp the larger picture, which is critical to knowing what details to focus on. Even though it may seem like some tests include everything covered during the semester, 99% of tests do not. Not so. - Kent

Sketchnotes 101: The Basics of Visual Note-taking Welcome to the second article in the the new Core77 "Sketchnotes Channel" (www.core77.com/sketchnotes) where we'll be exploring the application of visual thinking tools in the worlds of design and creative thinking. So you say you're ready to start sketchnoting. Maybe you're not much of a sketcher but you take a lot of notes, and are interested in making them more meaningful and interesting, but you're afraid your drawings are too crude. Maybe you're perpetually drawing and want to try and make your notes more useful and engaging but you are afraid of imposing structure to your normally freeform way of sketching. In the end, it's up to you. So let's get tactical. First you need the right tools for the job. My recommendation is to use an non-ruled notebook that feels big enough to draw in while it's in your lap, yet small enough that you're willing to bring it everywhere you go. Once you have your kit assembled, you'll need to think about the location you'll be sketchnoting.

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