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Digital Citizenship Graphic

Digital Citizenship Graphic
Digital citizenship is " the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use."It is the combination of technical and social skills that enable a person to be successful and safe in the information age. Just like literacy and numeracy initiatives which provide people with the skills to ' participate in the work force, digital literacy has become an essential skill to be a confident, connected, and actively involved life long learner.' I personally recommend that teachers and educators should, throughout the entire school year, devote special sessions to just teaching students about Digital Citizenship. Students need to learn how to act appropriately while using the net and there are several activities and resources to help you do that with them. Check out this section to access some of these resources. I am also sharing with you today a great graphic on the components of digital citizenship.Try out printing it and using it with your students in the classroom.

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/04/awesome-digital-citizenship-graphic-for.html

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Nine Elements of digital Citizenship Nine Themes of Digital Citizenship Digital citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use. 1. Digital Access: full electronic participation in society. Technology users need to be aware that not everyone has the same opportunities when it comes to technology. Digital footprint One of the great things about being online is the ability to share videos and photos with your friends and seeing their response. Everything you post online combines to make your digital footprint. Remember that what you share with your friends may also be viewed by people you don’t know. And once it’s online, it could be there forever. So think before you post.

46 Tools To Make Infographics In The Classroom Infographics are interesting–a mash of (hopefully) easily-consumed visuals (so, symbols, shapes, and images) and added relevant character-based data (so, numbers, words, and brief sentences). The learning application for them is clear, with many academic standards–including the Common Core standards–requiring teachers to use a variety of media forms, charts, and other data for both information reading as well as general fluency. It’s curious they haven’t really “caught on” in schools considering how well they bridge both the old-form textbook habit of cramming tons of information into a small space, while also neatly overlapping with the dynamic and digital world. So if you want to try to make infographics–or better yet have students make them–where do you start? The 46 tools below, curated by Faisal Khan, are a good place to start.

10 Excellent Digital Citizenship Tips for Your Students and Kids Now that you have understood the basics of Digital Citizenship and have read the digital footprint guide, you night be in need of a handy graphic to share with your students to wrap it up all. Well, I have one for you. The graphic below features some wonderful tips and pieces of advice on how to develop good manners online. Look at it as a code of online ethics to recommend not only to your students but to your kids as well. You can also print it and hang it on your classroom wall to constantly remind students of what is expected from them while using the world wide web. Enjoy

Devices Need to Support Learning So yesterday as I was scanning the #NJED hash tag on TweetDeck I came across this intriguing image shared by Mike Marotta. It really puts into perspective why we make many of the decisions that we do at New Milford High School as to why we decided to implement a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) initiative and don't mandate the use of one specific tool to support learning. His tweet contained this message, "Don't let the device drive instruction. Let it support learning." When it comes to educational technology I often get the feeling that the learning is often secondary. Using technology just for the sake of using it equates to a huge waste of instructional time that could be dedicated to deep, meaningful learning.

Lessons for Understanding YouTube & Digital Citizenship Overview We have devised an interactive curriculum aimed to support teachers of secondary students (approximately ages 13-17). The curriculum helps educate students on topics like: YouTube’s policies How to report content on YouTube How to protect their privacy online How to be responsible YouTube community members How to be responsible digital citizens

Nine Elements Nine Themes of Digital Citizenship Digital citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate, responsible behavior with regard to technology use. 1. Digital Access: full electronic participation in society. Technology users need to be aware that not everyone has the same opportunities when it comes to technology. elaboration So often student writing efforts are what I call "bare bones." Student writing lacks muscle and flesh and features, due to a paucity of specific verbs, adverbs, and adjectives, as well as a lack of complex sentence structure. Students often have not received instruction in showing versus telling.

Learning from experience How does the Cybersmart program stay up-to-date with the way children and young people use technology? This is an landscape that is changing at the speed of light, and it’s critical to know what the current issues really are, who they’re most important to, and how they might successfully be addressed within the educational framework we provide. We speak with literally thousands of children and young people each year as part of our internet safety awareness presentations in schools. This level of face-to-face interaction gives a perpetual stream of up-to-the-minute intelligence about what’s ‘in’ and what’s not, and what kind of things kids are actually doing. We also conduct formal research: the ACMA has released a number of widely acknowledged studies into how Australian families use media and technology, including our 2009 study “Click and Connect: Young Australians’ use of social media”.

Are Your Students Digitally Literate? 10 Resources Posted by Shelly Terrell on Friday, December 27th 2013 Included in the Digital Tips Advent Calendar and part of the Effective Technology Integration category A computer does not substitute for judgment any more than a pencil substitutes for literacy. ~ Robert S McNamara Our learners live in a connected world where technology impacts their lives daily. Kids and Media: Netiquette As in all public places, there are certain generally accepted rules for behaviour and etiquette on the Internet. It is important for both adults and children to know these rules, and we recommend parents to make sure that their children follow the rules in all their online activities. Guidelines for netiquette

Online Reputation Infographic You don't have to be running for president to care about your online reputation. Almost everything you do online is easy to track, especially when you're using social media sites. This infographic shows you how to manage your "e-reputation," perhaps saving you some embarrassment, or even your career.

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