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Worldology

Worldology

http://www.worldology.com/

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The World of 1898: The Spanish-American War "The war of the United States with Spain was very brief. Its results were many, startling, and of world-wide meaning." --Henry Cabot Lodge Hispanic Division, Library of Congress This presentation provides resources and documents about the Spanish-American War, the period before the war, and some of the fascinating people who participated in the fighting or commented about it. Information about Cuba, Guam, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, Spain, and the United States is provided in chronologies, bibliographies, and a variety of pictorial and textual material from bilingual sources, supplemented by an overview essay about the war and the period. Classic Age The National Academy in Athens, with Apollo and Athena on their columns, and Socrates and Plato seated in front represents the intellectual legacy of the Classic Age that continues to inform how humans understand life, truth and the universe. Classical antiquity, era, or period is a broad term for a long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean Sea, which begins roughly with the earliest-recorded Greek poetry of Homer (eighth-seventh century B.C.E.), and continues through the rise of Christianity and the fall of the Western Roman Empire (fifth century C.E.), ending in the dissolution of classical culture with the close of Late Antiquity (300—600 AD), or the similar and better known periodization of history, the Early Middle Ages (500-1100 C.E.). Such a wide sampling of history and territory covers many rather disparate cultures and periods.

Internet History Sourcebooks Project This page is a subset of texts derived from the three major online Sourcebooks listed below, along with added texts and web site indicators. For more contextual information, for instance about Western imperialism, or the history of a given period, check out these web sites. Internet Ancient History Sourcebook Europe Europe is the second smallest of the seven continents covering roughly 2% of the earth’s surface. The name 'Europe’ has long been thought to have been derived from the ancient myth of Zeus and Europa. According to this tale, the great god Zeus, seeing the lovely Phoenician princess Europa bathing (or, according to other versions, playing with her handmaidens) by the sea shore, transformed himself into a magnificent white bull and slowly approached her from the sea.

Connections Connections The Metropolitan Museum of Art Share Share Facebook Twitter StumbleUpon Email Internet History Sourcebooks Internet Ancient History Sourcebook The Internet Ancient History Sourcebook has expanded greatly since its creation, and now contains hundred of local files as well as links to source texts throughout the net. See Introduction for an explanation of the Sourcebook's goals. See the Help! page for all the help on research I can offer. Although I am more than happy to receive notes if you have comments on this web site, I cannot answer specific research enquiries [and - for students - I cannot, or rather will not, do your homework.]

Who were the Mongols? Around 500 BCE, a tribe of nomadic people called the Mongols lived in Asia. The Mongols were traders and herdsmen. They herded sheep and traded horses with the ancient Chinese and Persians. In the summer, they moved with their herds across the vast steppes of Asia, seeking fresh pasture land. GREAT MILITARY BATTLES At the height of the Assyrian Empire (700 BC) she possessed the most powerful army yet seen in the ancient world, and would go on to dominate the for three hundred years. Expansion began in the reign of King Ashurnasirpal II (883 – 859) BC whose campains would reveal the true military skill on which the Assyrians would conquer, their superior tactics and technology in siege warfare. In his first campaign, Ashurnasirpal captured five cities in an era when other warlords would have regarded the capture of one a successful conclusion to hostilities. Ashurnasirpal’s son Shalmaneser III (859 - 824) BC also adopted a policy of conquest.

Sakamoto Ryoma and Nakaoka Shintaro: Very Different, Yet Very Similar The alliance between Satsuma and Choshu, concluded in early 1866, was a turning point in the revolution. Sakamoto Ryoma’s biographers never fail to point out that the epochal event was brought about by a political outlaw who considered himself “a nobody.” While Ryoma receives so much of the historical limelight, it must not be forgotten that Nakaoka Shintaro, Ryoma’s cohort from Tosa, also played an indispensable role in bringing about the Satsuma-Choshu Alliance. Until the alliance was concluded, Satsuma and Choshu were bitter enemies.

The Crusades - home page Return from the Crusade by Karl Friedrich Lessing Rheinisches Landesmuseum This site is a fully virtual course offered through Boise State University. The course materials are open to the general public and to other educators. Please see the Visitor Center for details. Visitor Center Classroom The 9,000-year-old underground megalithic settlement of Atlit Yam Not far off the coast of the village of Atlit in the Mediterranean Sea, near Haifa in Israel, lies the submerged ruins of the ancient Neolithic site of Atlit Yam. The prehistoric settlement, which dates back to the 7 th millennium BC, has been so well preserved by the sandy seabed that a mysterious stone circle still stands as it was first erected, and dozens of human skeletons lay undisturbed in their graves. Atlit Yam is one of the oldest and largest sunken settlements ever found and sheds new light on the daily lives of its ancient inhabitants. Today, Atlit Yam lies between 8 – 12 metres beneath sea level and covered an area of 40,000 square metres.

Europe in the Late Middle Ages This site is Dr. Knox's online course on the Late Middle Ages. This upper-division college course covers the history of Europe from 1300 to the beginning of the Reformation (1517), a period that is often called "the Renaissance." This course concentrates on social, political and economic history, leaving the visual and literary arts to other disciplines on campus; it does, however, consider the Renaissance as a general cultural movement. The Early Middle East Symbols of the three religions that originated in the Middle East: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. "The cradle of civilization." Throughout the centuries, historians have used these powerful words to describe the Middle East. In the ancient Middle East, many great civilizations rose and fell. The religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam each trace their origins back to this part of the world.

Europe in the Age of the Reformation This site is intended for multiple audiences: my students, other teachers, and the general public. Anyone is welcome to browse through any part of the site. Only the discussion area is restricted to students currently enrolled in the course. If you are just visiting, go to the Visitors Center. If you are a current student, or if you are considering signing up for this course, go to the Classroom.

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