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Html5shiv - HTML5 IE enabling script

Html5shiv - HTML5 IE enabling script
Dual licensed under the MIT or GPL Version 2 licenses Full original, uncompressed source available here: Source code adds new HTML5 elements (which is simple code), but also supports printing HTML5 elements and includes the default styles for HTML5 elements, like block on article and section. Getting it to work in the browser was easy, @jon_neal and afarkas made IE actually print HTML5 elements - these guys are to take all the credit. To use this script, download the html5shiv and roll it in to your own code (ideally minified). Common question: what's the difference between the html5shim and the html5shiv? Related:  HTML / CSS

About normalize.css Normalize.css is a small CSS file that provides better cross-browser consistency in the default styling of HTML elements. It’s a modern, HTML5-ready, alternative to the traditional CSS reset. Normalize.css is currently used in some form by Twitter Bootstrap, HTML5 Boilerplate, GOV.UK, Rdio, CSS Tricks, and many other frameworks, toolkits, and sites. Overview Normalize.css is an alternative to CSS resets. The aims of normalize.css are as follows: Preserve useful browser defaults rather than erasing them.Normalize styles for a wide range of HTML elements.Correct bugs and common browser inconsistencies.Improve usability with subtle improvements.Explain the code using comments and detailed documentation. It supports a wide range of browsers (including mobile browsers) and includes CSS that normalizes HTML5 elements, typography, lists, embedded content, forms, and tables. Despite the project being based on the principle of normalization, it uses pragmatic defaults where they are preferable.

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CSS Tools: Reset CSS The goal of a reset stylesheet is to reduce browser inconsistencies in things like default line heights, margins and font sizes of headings, and so on. The general reasoning behind this was discussed in a May 2007 post, if you're interested. Reset styles quite often appear in CSS frameworks, and the original "meyerweb reset" found its way into Blueprint, among others. The reset styles given here are intentionally very generic. There isn't any default color or background set for the body element, for example. In other words, this is a starting point, not a self-contained black box of no-touchiness. If you want to use my reset styles, then feel free! Previous Versions v1.0 (200802) Acknowledgments Thanks to Paul Chaplin for the blockquote / q rules.

Layout 31 1) Content here. column long long column very long fill fill fill long text text column text silly very make long very fill silly make make long make text fill very long text column silly silly very column long very column filler fill long make filler long silly very long silly silly silly long filler make column filler make silly long long fill very. very make make fill silly long long filler column long make silly silly column filler fill fill very filler text fill filler column make fill make text very make make very fill fill long make very filler column very long very filler silly very make filler silly make make column column fill long make long text very make long fill column make text very silly column filler silly text fill text filler filler filler make make make make text filler fill column filler make silly make text text fill make very filler column very Add Text to this section

Five simple steps to designing grid systems - Part 5 – September 19th, 2005 – It’s been a while, but this is the final part in my series ‘Five Simple Steps to designing Grid Systems’. Flexible vs Fixed. Lets’s start by briefly examining Fixed and Flexible, or Fluid designs. They both have their merits. Fixed width designs are, well, just easier to produce. Flexible width designs scale to the user’s resolution, and therefore the browser window. However, they both also have the down sides such as fixed layouts generally scale badly and flexible layouts tend to look very wide and short. Flexible grids As discussed the first few parts of this series, grid system design deals in fixed measurements - the media size, the type size and ultimately the grid size. I’ve been giving flexible width a lot of thought over the past few weeks in preparation for writing this article. Adaptive Grid Systems Ideally grid systems should be designed around the type size. The grid elements adapt to the user’s changes, andThe grid must retain it’s orginal proportions

CSS Shorthand Guide Sunday Oct 23 2005 Ok. Let's set the record straight. Background Backgrounds can be tricky. background properties Believe it or not, all these properties can be combined into one single background property as follows: the background shorthand property The Unknown Often times developers find themselves wondering What if I leave out this value or that one? default background property values Lesson learned: be careful on what you don't declare. background shorthand example (unexplicit) This would be the same as declaring the following values: background shorthand example (explicit) Font Font is perhaps the trickiest. font properties The default values for the font shorthand property are as follows: default font property values And of course without any further ado. the font shorthand property Here is where it gets tricky. or and . strong element styled with font font shorthand property example (unexplicit) This would be the same as declaring the following properties: the font shorthand property (explicit)

Can I use... Support tables for HTML5, CSS3, etc HTML5 / CSS3 Browser Support 4 comments | Related thoughts: CSS3, HTML5, Mobile Support Charts If you need to find which browsers support which HTML5/CSS3/SVG/lastest-and-greatest features, here are a few resources that I find helpful (I’m sure there are other — let me know which sites you use in the comments below). When Can I Use is a frequently updated set of tables showing browser support for CSS3, HTML5, SVG and other cutting edge technologies. Testing There are several sites that can report your browser’s support for various technologies — just visit the sites below and you’ll see a list of where your browser succeeds … and fails. HTML5 Test provides a quick test of your browser’s support for HTML5 elements and related technologies (like Geolocation, Web Workers, and WebGL).

Browser Sandbox - Spoon.net The Spoon.net Browser Sandbox makes cross-browser testing and backwards compatibility easy. Just click Run for any browser to launch it instantly. Browsers run within an isolated virtual environment, eliminating the need for installs and allowing legacy browsers such as Internet Explorer 6 to run on Windows 7 and 8. Virtualized browsers behave exactly like installed browsers. Spoon.net supports standard browser components like Java applets and ActiveX controls as well as popular browser plugins like Firebug, IE Developer Toolbar, and CSS and JavaScript debugging consoles. Using the Browser Sandbox at Work?

CSS3 Animation Cheat Sheet - Justin Aguilar How it works The CSS3 Animation Cheat Sheet is a set of preset, plug-and-play animations for your web projects. All you need to do is add the stylesheet to your website and apply the premade CSS classes to the elements you want animated. The CSS3 Animation Cheat Sheet uses CSS3 @keyframes and works on all the latest browsers (that's IE 10). Using CSS3 @keyframes, you don't have to worry about positioning the element to accomodate the animations - it will animate into place. Also for users with older browsers, the animated element will be visible and in place, even if the animation doesn't trigger. Add the animation stylesheet to the <head> element of your webpage: Replace css with the name of the directory where the animation stylesheet is. Add an animation class to the element you want animated: Replace slideUp with the desired animation class. For entrance animations, you need to make them invisible by adding the visibility: hidden property to the animated element: Adding effects

Emmet — the essential toolkit for web-developers Learn Web Design: 50+ of the Best Online Educational Resources to Learn to Build Web Sites Tutorials & Guides Free or Low Cost Keep your hard-earned dollars in your pocket Text-Based Good for those who like to learn via reading and see text code examples Shay Howe's Guides to HTML & CSS Shay Howe bundles HTML and CSS into one learning block that is beginner-friendly and well organized. Those who have the basics can continue with his advanced guide, which expands the concepts previously learned and specifically aims to help designers broaden and shore up their HTML, CSS and jQuery skills. HTML 101 at Berkeley Knight Digital Media Center While this resource is provided by a very credible source, its intended audience is not hardcore developers but career journalists and communication professionals. Web Development for Beginners from WebPlatform Web Development for Beginners is a survey of the essential skills necessary for a web developer to be able to execute code efficiently and effectively, even with little to no skill. The HTML & CSS Book from Wiley Books Online Courses Codecademy

Coder's Block Blog / Fun Times with CSS Counters CSS counters are one of those “oh neat, didn’t know CSS could do that” features with a lot of interesting potential. In simple terms, they let you keep a running tally of things in CSS — no JavaScript needed. Basic Counter Here’s an easy pagination example to get us started: The numbers you see aren’t hardcoded in HTML. Counter properties follow a “when this element is encountered in the document” flow. Multiple Counters You can have multiple counters just by using different names. Relevant CSS: Here you can see the syntax for initializing multiple counters at once (line 2). Counting User Selections Now we’re getting to the fun stuff. The CSS is really not much of a leap from our previous examples. Controlling Increments Counters don’t have to increment by 1. The syntax is simple enough: While we’re on the subject, you can also control the starting value of a counter: Potential Gotcha An element with display: none on it will not increment a counter. Closing Remarks

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