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21st-Century Teacher Education

21st-Century Teacher Education
For almost as long as there have been institutions dedicated to the preparation of new teachers, the endeavor has come in for criticism. Teacher education has long struggled both to professionalize and to fully integrate itself into mainstream academia. At the core of this struggle was a perception that there was no body of specialized knowledge for teaching that justified specialized training. Over the last few decades, criticism of teacher preparation has shifted away from a largely academic debate to the troubling performance of American students. Shocked by teacher education’s refusal to train teachers to use scientifically based reading methods, Reid Lyon, who headed a 30-year study at the National Institutes of Health of how people best learn to read, once stated, “If there was any piece of legislation that I could pass it would be to blow up colleges of education.” An occasional insider has joined the fray. The Perspective of Teacher Educators Far beyond Semantics • Early reading. Related:  Metasites

Association of American Educators Strategies for Effective Lesson Planning Stiliana Milkova Center for Research on Learning and Teaching A lesson plan is the instructor’s road map of what students need to learn and how it will be done effectively during the class time. Before you plan your lesson, you will first need to identify the learning objectives for the class meeting. Objectives for student learningTeaching/learning activitiesStrategies to check student understanding Specifying concrete objectives for student learning will help you determine the kinds of teaching and learning activities you will use in class, while those activities will define how you will check whether the learning objectives have been accomplished (see Fig. 1). Steps for Preparing a Lesson Plan Below are six steps to guide you when you create your first lesson plans. (1) Outline learning objectives The first step is to determine what you want students to learn and be able to do at the end of class. What is the topic of the lesson? (2) Develop the introduction (6) Create a realistic timeline

Agency for Instructional Technology (AIT) 6 Free Websites for Learning and Teaching Science From robotics to space research, from physics to computer science, the Internet is a vast trove of information about the sciences. Resources such as Wikipedia (and its easy-on-younger-minds counterpart, Simple English Wikipedia) and online video make the process of learning about and teaching science subjects much easier than ever before. Rather than resorting to yet another 600-page textbook, next time you're hard up for understanding or inspiration, check out one of these six websites that offer information on the sciences. 1. If genetics and evolution are of interest to you, Scitable is a must-see resource. Cool Fact: "Genetic drift describes random fluctuations in allele frequencies in populations, which can eventually cause a population of organisms to be genetically distinct from its original population and result in the formation of a new species." Must-See Page: Student Voices, a blog about science by students, for students. 2. iTunes U 3. 4. 5. 6.

Educational Leadership:Teaching for the 21st Century:21st Century Skills: The Challenges Ahead Andrew J. Rotherham and Daniel Willingham A growing number of business leaders, politicians, and educators are united around the idea that students need "21st century skills" to be successful today. Critical thinking and problem solving, for example, have been components of human progress throughout history, from the development of early tools, to agricultural advancements, to the invention of vaccines, to land and sea exploration. What's actually new is the extent to which changes in our economy and the world mean that collective and individual success depends on having such skills. This distinction between "skills that are novel" and "skills that must be taught more intentionally and effectively" ought to lead policymakers to different education reforms than those they are now considering. What Will It Take? The history of U.S. education reform should greatly concern everyone who wants schools to do a better job of teaching students to think. Better Curriculum Better Teaching References

25 Best Websites for Teachers 1. Best for Young Readers: The Stacks At The Stacks, students can post book reviews, get reading recommendations, play games based on the latest series, watch "Meet the Author" videos, and more. It's like Facebook for reading and it's safe for school, too. 2. Use Scholastic's Book Wizard to level your classroom library, find resources for the books you teach, and create reading lists with the click of a button. 3. With hundreds of lessons for every grade level, you're guaranteed to find a colorful idea for your class, such as the "Chinese Dragon Drum" for Chinese New Year or the "What Do You Love?" 4. Establish a morning routine with Scholastic's Daily Starters — fun, fast math and language arts prompts and questions, including Teachable Moments from history and Fun Facts, such as "Before erasers, people used a piece of bread!" 5. 6. Add the beginner's version of the Wordsmyth widget to your toolbar, and students can look up new vocabulary no matter where they are online. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Podcast Type of digital media A podcast is an episodic series of digital audio or video files which a user can download in order to listen. Alternatively, the word "podcast" may refer to the individual component of such a series or to an individual media file.[1] Podcasting often uses a subscription model, whereby new episodes automatically download via web syndication to a user's own local computer, mobile application, or portable media player.[2] Ben Hammersley originally suggested the word "podcast" as a portmanteau of "iPod" (a brand of media player) and "broadcast"[3][4] in 2004. The files distributed are in audio format, but may sometimes include other file formats such as PDF or EPUB. Podcasting studio in What Cheer Writers Club in Providence, Rhode Island Some[who?] Name[edit] Other names for podcasting include "net cast", intended as a vendor-neutral term without the loose reference to the Apple iPod. History[edit] In August 2004, Adam Curry launched his show Daily Source Code. Oggcast[edit]

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