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The Vikings - Britons, Gaels, Picts, Angles and Vikings

The Vikings - Britons, Gaels, Picts, Angles and Vikings
The Vikings were Norsemen who came to raid and pillage, to trade and to settle in Scotland. They were expert sailors who made their way across the treacherous North Sea in longships from Norway and Denmark from the late 8th century. The Vikings sailed as far west as Greenland and North America. The pagan Vikings raided Christian monasteries in search of gold and silver, food and slaves. Monks wrote in horror of their attacks – seeing dreadful omens in the sky. In this year terrible portents appeared over Northumbria and sadly affrightened the inhabitants: there were exceptional flashes of lightning, and fiery dragons were seen flying in the air. Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, AD 793 The Norse began to settle in Scotland and gradually merged with the local people. Before the Vikings came as raiders their ancestors were probably traders who visited Scotland.

http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/scotlandshistory/britonsgaelsvikings/vikings/index.asp

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Viking Adventures A one-hour schools and families broadcast called Viking Adventures from the British Museum. Ed Petrie, much-loved presenter of Pompeii Live for schools, and well-known BBC presenter Sonali Shah will present the show. "Viking Adventures from the British Museum should be compulsory viewing for all school age children. Education Authorities should book en-bloc and take all the school children to the cinema for this experience!"

"Thor's Hammer" Found in Viking Graves Kate Ravilious in York, U.K. Long dismissed as accidental additions to Viking graves, prehistoric "thunderstones"—fist-size stone tools resembling the Norse god Thor's hammerhead—were actually purposely placed as good-luck talismans, archaeologists say. The Norse thunder god, Thor, wields his hammer, Mjöllnir, in an undated woodcut. Illustration from World History Archive, Alamy. Using fire-starting rock such as flint, Stone Age people originally created the stones to serve as axes. But the Vikings, whose Iron Age heyday lasted from about A.D. 800 to 1050, saw the primitive tools as lightning repellent.

Viking Longships - Children's British History Encyclopedia Many Vikings were good sailors because they lived close to rivers and fjords (sea inlets). They grew up from childhood able to use ships for fishing and travelling. A big Viking longship would be about 30 metres long and were made from overlapping planks of oak wood joined together with iron rivets (bits of metal hammered into holes). Each ship could carry 60 men.

Beyond Lands' End: Viking Voyage 1000 Click on the images below to view enlargements Nomads of the North Atlantic: The Original Viking Ships Without their marvelous sailing ships, the Vikings would have played a much smaller part in history. But centuries of getting around on the water created a race of master boatbuilders, and the ships they developed represented a giant step forward in the design and capabilities of coastal and seagoing vessels. Viking ships evolved from much earlier and simpler watercraft. Dugouts, for example, existed in Denmark as far back as 5000 B.C.

Vikings homework help The Vikings wanted new land because the places where they came from in Scandinavia – Norway, Sweden and Denmark – weren’t very easy to live on. It was hard to grow crops, which meant there wasn’t a lot of food as the population got bigger. Britain and Europe had plenty of good farmland, so the Vikings tried to claim some of that land for themselves. Viking Age The Viking Age is the period from 793 to 1066 in European history, especially Northern European and Scandinavian history, following the Germanic Iron Age. It is the period of history when Scandinavian Norsemen explored Europe by its seas and rivers for trade, raids and conquest. In this period, the Vikings also settled in Norse Greenland and Newfoundland, and present-day Faroe Islands, Iceland, Normandy, Scotland, Ireland, Russia and Anatolia.[2]

* 101 Viking Facts from the History Specialists 1. Vikings were very clean people (at least by comparison to other people at the time!). 2. A Viking's most treasured weapon was his sword. They were handed down generations via inheritance, were often named and could be inscribed with runes by talented smiths to magically increase their power. 3. Norse Social Structure The ancient Vikings Social structure was relatively simple, and followed many of the common traits all societies exhibit. Of course in every society there are the high status members and the lower status members, Viking society was no different at all. Being a member of upper echelon of Viking society obviously offered plenty of rewards and benefits, and was held by the Viking Kings.

Fun Facts on Vikings for kids *** Fun Facts on Vikings for KidsLooking for help with homework and school? Find out fast, fun facts and interesting information using our useful fact files, fact sheets and funny videos on each of the Viking Subjects. The free Facts Files and Fact sheets provide interesting, amazing, fun facts and information, together with pictures, photos and a fun video. The free fact files and free fact sheets include cool info plus a free video, they are great guide to the Viking Era and include topics about warriors, ships, women, children, history, clothing and daily home life Fun Facts on Vikings Ships for KidsFind out quick, fun facts and interesting information using our useful fact files and fact sheets on Viking Ships.

Courtship, Love and Marriage in Viking Scandinavia Part I -- Forward and Introduction Forward Some time ago, some friends of mine came to me and asked me to tell them how a Viking wedding was conducted. Although I write a column entitled"The Viking Answer Lady" for my local SCA newsletter, I hadn't a clue as to the answer. When I turned to the sagas, they didn't tell me, either. Thus began the start of a massive research project that has produced the work you are about to read. Social Classes in Viking Society Social Classes in Viking Society Three social classes existed in Norse society. The classes were nowhere near as rigid as they were in other parts of Europe at the time.

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