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Standards and Guidelines for Crochet and Knitting

Standards and Guidelines for Crochet and Knitting
The publishers, fiber, needle and hook manufacturers and yarn members of the Craft Yarn Council have worked together to set up a series of guidelines and symbols to bring uniformity to yarn, needle and hook labeling and to patterns, whether they appear in books, magazines, leaflets or on yarn labels. Our goal is to make it easier for industry manufacturers, publishers and designers to prepare consumer-friendly products and for consumers to select the right materials for a project and complete it successfully. Included are: We urge manufacturers, publishers and designers, to adopt these guidelines. We received valuable input from allied associations in the United States, such as The National NeedleArts Association, the Crochet Guild of America, and The Knitting Guild Association, as well as designers and consumers. Related:  chart & softwareJEUX*HOBBIES*CRAFTS*

Chez Plum » Tutorial: How I make my knitting charts for lace So, a couple weeks ago I showed a glimpse of the knitting chart I was working on. I finally took the time to make a little tutorial and explain the way I did it. I hope it’s clear enough, or feel free to ask your questions ! This one will be the lace pattern used in the Isabeau purse pattern. I start with creating a table in an Excell-type software (Im using the freeware OpenOffice Calc, here with a french version). First, select all the area of your future chart, go to format/columns/width and decrease the witdth of the columns (I chose 0,53 cm) to create nearly-square cells. Select the area of your future chart, color it in a light color of you choice. Number the rows and stitches, starting at bottom right corner of chart. Then the “real work” starts. Then I copy the “repeat” of my lace pattern below, in another colored area. The chart is nearly ready.

Knitting Chart Maker - Review of Knitting Chart Maker Program by Jacquie The Bottom Line For a free program, this is a good option for people who want to make charts for their own use and who have a good grasp of what the different symbols mean. I found it a little frustrating to use, but other people might not replicate the problems I had. And even with the issues I had, I would probably still use this program to make simple charts for my own use. Pros It's free.Easy to use for basic designs.Can easily transfer the chart to an image editing program.You can add custom cable patterns and colors for Fair Isle or intarsia.Shows a stitch count so you can ensure you're increasing and decreasing evenly across a row. Cons I had trouble sometimes switching between symbols.I couldn't get tinking to work in the color mode.I couldn't get back to the design mode after switching to color mode without shutting down.The online and downloaded versions have different features and are better for different things. Description Guide Review - Jacquie's Knitting Chart Maker

Amigurumi: Guide To Reading Japanese Patterns Just thought I'd make a guide on reading Japanese amigurumi patterns to complement this awesome guide, which I've seen linked a couple of times, since it isn't amigurumi-specific and hence didn't include some of the stitches commonly used to make amis. I am of the (very biased!) view that Japanese amis are some of the awesomest things ever, so I think it would be wonderful if others could learn how to read these patterns too. :) Do keep in mind that while I've only been working from these patterns, I'm still kind of new to this, so for those who have experience with these patterns (and in Japanese), if I've missed out something or got something wrong somewhere, please feel free to correct me! :) Now that's out of the way, let's get started! *This guide uses US stitch-terminology. INTRODUCTIONJapanese ami patterns usually look like this: You may also see a stitch-counting guide at the side of the pattern, which shows how many stitches you should have in each row.

Intwined Pattern Studio Les sites pour apprendre à coudre / patrons de couture gratuits | Madame Choup Apprendre à coudre sur Internet : des sites qui regorgent de conseils, tutos et patrons. Leçons, conseils couture Petit Citron: toutes les techniques de couture en image, des conseils, patrons…L’Atelier de Couture Husqvarna Viking : les base avec des vidéos explicatives pour coudre des poches, faire un ourlet, poser une fermetureCoupe Couture : « Le blog qui vous apprend à coudre ». ce blog est une mine d’informations pour nous les débutantes (et aussi les confirmées), des explications claires et illustrées pour faire des doublures, coussins…Leçons de couture : un blog qui recense les blogs couture avec des tutos. Classement par catégories : accessoires, jupe, hauts, pantalons… Patrons de couture gratuits Toujours plus haut : site qui liste des patrons de couture gratuits sur Internet. WordPress: J'aime chargement…

Crochet School 21: Reading Crochet Charts Remember in the last lesson where I said that the simpler the pattern the better? Well how's this for simple? (hover your mouse over to see the difference between the square and the chart overlay) Do you see how you could possibly not even need words to make a pattern if you knew what the symbols were? That's something that makes crochet awesome! Note: we have talked about US vs UK terms so far. I've found that some patterns will give written out directions along with a chart, which makes it a bit easier if you aren't sure what a symbol means. This first chart is of the general stitches that we have learned. The arrows on this image point to the parts of the stitch that make up the symbol. I for one love to read charts because I'm a visual person and the more information I can get packed into a visual is better. Here are the symbols for the other stitches and variations we have learned throughout crochet school: Now that you know the symbols, you probably should know how to read them.

software I mostly love my iPad, but I wish someone would write the perfect knitting app. The iTunes store has quite a large handful--counters, project managers, books--but none of them is The Killer Knitting App. Recently, a new program appeared that would seem, from reading the PR, to fulfill my KKA requirements. Errrgh. Basically, iAnnotate lets you download, read, annotate, organize, and send PDF files. First of all, let's go get a PDF. iAnnotate has a built-in web browser that let's you: Convert a web page to a PDF and download it--useful for grabbing Knitty patterns Get patterns from DropBox Navigate to a PDF in your Ravelry library and download it directly Download patterns directly from your Ravelry library via WebDav (a protocol that allows collaboration between users and websites for editing and managing documents and files)In the image below, I've navigated, via iAnnotate's built-in browser, to Mawelucky's gorgeous Gail (aka Nightsongs) shawl (Free!) I clicked on the download link...

Apprendre-Couture.fr | Tutoriaux, exercices de couture sur machines à coudre, brodeuse How Do You Read A Crochet Pattern? There are currently no images from other crafters. close Terms & Conditions You must enter into this Agreement if you want to submit digital images or other content to Prime Publishing through Sharing Customer Images (the "Service"). 1) Eligibility. 2) Definitions. 3) License Grant for Materials. 4) Removal of Materials. 5) License for Name, Trademarks and Likenesses. 6) Specifications and Guidelines. 7) Representations, Warranties and Indemnities. 8) Restrictions. 9) No Obligation. 10) Changes to Agreement. 11) Prime Publishing Intellectual Property. 12) Communications. 13) Waiver. 14) Disclaimer. 15) Miscellaneous. Sharing Your Own Images Who can share images? You! What should I share? Please share images that will help other visitors. Do include captions for your images. What shouldn't I share? Behave as if you were a guest at a friend's dinner party: please treat the Prime Publishing community with respect. The same guidelines apply to your captions and notes. Where will my image appear?

Software for Knitters: Part III--Knit Visualizer Review Knit Visualizer version 1.2 Platform: Mac and PCRating: 4 out of 5 stars Knit Visualizer is an astounding programming tour de force. The program not only lets you paint stitches onto a graph, it also can translate written directions into a chart for you. This version is not especially appropriate for charting in color—there are better programs currently available for this kind of design (and I will talk about them in later postings). As you can see from the picture above (which will be far clearer if you click on it.These blurry Blogger thumbnails are just awful), the layout consists of the main chart window, a panel of stitch symbols on the right, a text entry field on the bottom, and an icon toolbar under the Main Menu bar on the top. Here's a snip of the chart itself. There are several ways to use the program. Here I am typing in Row 5… And here’s what Knit Visualizer displays when I press the Enter key. There’s a limit to the translator’s intelligence. You get the idea.

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