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8 Steps to Create Engaging Google Forms ( for Teachers )

8 Steps to Create Engaging Google Forms ( for Teachers )
Today's tutorial is on the use of Google forms. By the end of this guide you will be able to : Create a Google form with different questionsCustomize your Google Forms using a plethora of templatesShare your Google forms Embed your Forms in your Blog or websiteStep 1 Head over to your Google Docs and click on Create then on Form Step 2 Give your form a title and a description Step 3 Choose a background for your form to make it look cute. Step 4 Now you start filling up you form. and then choose which type of questions you want to use. Here is how each form looks like. Multiple choice questions Grid Scale Choose from a list Check-boxes Paragraph text Or just text Step 5 Click on " Add Other " to add the option other to your questions. Step 6 If you want to add page break to your form so that students answer a set of questions on one page and then click on continue to answer the others here is how to do it : Click on " add items " located at the bottom of the page and add the forms you want . Related:  explore

Quickly Add Speech Bubbles and Effects to Images Phrase.it is a simple service that anyone can use to add speech bubbles and some basic Instagram-like effects to your pictures. To use the service just upload a picture and choose a speech bubble. Drag your speech bubble into place then type your text. Applications for EducationPhrase.it does not require any kind of registration to use which means that students don't have to have email addresses to use it. H/T to Larry Ferlazzo. Quest to learn : l’école où l’on joue à apprendre Malgré les multiples de tentatives de réformer l’éducation en France et ailleurs, le rapport entre l’élève, le professeur et la connaissance n’a guère changé : l’enseignant reste l’unique diffuseur du savoir. Quant à l’intégration des technologies, elle se limite souvent à la salle d’informatique où l’on apprend péniblement quelques fonctionnalités de Word. Ne parlons même pas des jeux vidéos, qui restent le grand Satan. Image : Katie Salen lors de la conférence Hacking Education organisée par l’Union Square Ventures en 2009. Autant d’attitudes dont Katie Salen prend le contrepied. Dans le cadre des rencontres organisées par le CRI (Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire), autour des nouveaux modèles d’apprentissage à l’école et de la place de l’enfant, elle a défendu le rôle de la technologie dans l’élaboration de projets communs dans lesquels l’expertise des élèves est reconnue au même titre que celle du professeur. Image : La home page de présentation de Quest to lean.

20+ Creative Ways Teachers Can Use Google Forms A couple of days ago I created and shared with you a Google Form tutorial simplifying the process of creating forms to use in your teaching. The assessment form I included at the end of that post proved to me that you really liked and benefited from this tutorial. I am so glad you did and thank you for the time you spent reading and filling in the form. Today I am sharing with you another resource on how to use Google Forms with your students or as Tanya, the creator of this slideshow, named them innovative pedagogical strategies for using Google Forms.There is alot to learn from Tanya's ideas and which you can apply in your own teaching context. Here is in brief the innovative pedagogical ways of using Google Forms Tanya talked about in this slide : Check out the slide HERE

Brainstorming and Voting -Tricider Find the best solution by involving your friends, colleagues or clients. A feedback session with customers or the decision on the new logo. tricider is the easiest way, to gather all opinions and ideas. It´s brainstorming and voting, all in one and online! Even hard decisions can be easy with tricider. Free and no registration. Save time - discussing and voting online. tricider is easy to use. Brainstorming without limits Whether you want to collect ideas for best location for the next team event or vote for the new name and logo of your product: tricider provides the right features for any kind of question. That's what others say Quickly Add Speech Bubbles and Effects to Images Phrase.it is a simple service that anyone can use to add speech bubbles and some basic Instagram-like effects to your pictures. To use the service just upload a picture and choose a speech bubble. Drag your speech bubble into place then type your text. You can change the font style in your speech bubbles. Click the "add more drama" button to add one of four image shading effects. Applications for EducationPhrase.it does not require any kind of registration to use which means that students don't have to have email addresses to use it. H/T to Larry Ferlazzo.

La pédagogie active, selon Marcel Lebrun, doit… New in Google Forms- Print Friendly Forms for Teachers Just another great update to the Google Froms service. Google announced today that users can now print their Google forms in a print friendly format. Say goodbye to the days of trying to create a form or survey in a text document -- you can now print your Google Forms with ease. When you print a form, each question is formatted in a way that makes it simple for people to fill in when printed on paper. To try it out, just create a form and press the print button. With this new update, teachers now can have a better page layout for the quizzes, surveys, and polls they created using Google form.

How can you make a “good” clicker question GREAT? By: Stephanie Chasteen, University of Colorado Boulder | Category: Higher Education Sometimes we can be lucky enough to have access to a great set of clicker questions (see, for example, the list at STEMclickers.colorado.edu). But often a good set of questions for our course doesn't exist, or another instructor's questions don't quite fit. Factual recall questions are the most common type of question that you might find yourself stuck with. So, how do we take a question like that and turn it into a question that sparks discussion, reasoning, and debate? Bloomifying Your Questions "Bloomifying" basically takes a lower-level question and uses some handy verbs to get ideas on how to make it a higher-level question that requires more thought. The nice thing is that many people have developed lists of verbs that go along with each level of Bloom's Taxonomy – and this is a very helpful thing. Here's an example. That wouldn't really generate much discussion. Here's another example.

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