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ETTC's new and improved Poetry Forms

ETTC's new and improved Poetry Forms

Results on ReadWriteThink Home › Results from ReadWriteThink 1-8 of 8 Results from ReadWriteThink Sort by: Classroom Resources | Grades K – 12 | Student Interactive | Writing Poetry Acrostic Poems This online tool enables students to learn about and write acrostic poems. FREE Online Rhyming Dictionary Writing Challenge Generator Challenges The story must involve a crown in it. During the story, a character finds out a dark secret. During the story, there is a fight. A character becomes furious during the story. The story ends during a jailbreak. The story must have a rabbit at the beginning. A character will send a package. During the story, a relative shows up. A character steals something, and the action has far better results than expected. The story must have a navigator in it. During the story, a famous person goes missing.

Yarny Learning Resources | Shel Silverstein “My beard grows to my toes, I never wear no clothes, I wraps my hair Around my bare, And down the road I goes.” – “My Beard” Where the Sidewalk Ends “Needles and pins, Needles and pins, Sew me a sail To catch me the wind.” – from “Needles and Pins” Falling Up “Millie McDeevit screamed a scream So loud it made her eyebrows steam.” – from “Screamin’ Millie” Falling Up “I will not play at tug o’ war. I’d rather play at hug o’ war” – from “Hug O’ War” Where the Sidewalk Ends “If you are a dreamer, come in.” – from “Invitation” Where the Sidewalk Ends “Anything can happen, child, ANYTHING can be.” – from “Listen to the Mustn’ts" Where the Sidewalk Ends “Balancing my ABCs Takes from noon to half past three. I don’t have time to grab a T Or even stop to take a P.” – “Alphabalance” Falling Up “Last night I had a crazy dream That I was teachin’ school.

WritingFix: prompts, lessons, and resources for writing classrooms Character Chart FAVORITES Color: Music: Food: Literature: Expressions: Book: Quote: Expletive(s) (swears): Mode of transportation: HABITS Smokes: What? How often? SELF-PERCEPTION One word character would use to describe self: One paragraph description of how character would describe self: What does character consider best physical characteristic? Immediate goal(s): Long range goal(s): How does character plan to accomplish goal(s)? How character react in a crisis (calm/panic/etc.)? Jewelry? Owns a computer? © (c ) copyright 1990-2011 Rebecca Sinclair ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Authors Note: I worked hard on this. ~ Permission is granted to LINK TO the Fiction Writers Character Chart. ~ Permission is granted to print out a copy of the Fiction Writers Character Chart FOR PERSONAL USE ~ Permission is NOT granted to copy and/or use the Character Chart in print and/or electronic form (including the internet) without express written permission)

Barbaric Yawp in the 21st Century: Using Tech to Engage Budding Poets What if Dead Poets Society were set in modern times? Would Mr. Keating (Robin Williams' character) tweet Walt Whitman? I sound my barbaric yawp over the roofs of the world. Would the students have created a Facebook group rather than sneak off to a cave? In the movie, students shouted quotes to music blasted from a record player while on the soccer field. We don't read and write poetry because it's cute. We teach poetry because "it is language distilled to its most effective level. However, given our students' inclination to use technology, consider the potential if we leveraged that desire to help them better identify with poetry. Uncovering Poetry in Primary Sources Much like I inadvertently destroyed a number of great literary works with bad book projects, I will also confess to assigning a handful of brutally dry poetry assignments. Lauren also incorporated the audio recording features of Explain Everything into the process. Delivering Poetry through Multiple Media

Writing Exercises and Prompts for Journaling, Prose, Poetry and Memoirs These Writing Exercises are a collection of prompts originally published in The Journal Newsletter. The prompts include journaling prompts, prose prompts, poetry prompts, free writing prompts, and memoir prompts. Jump to the exercises you would like to see: Prompts Copyright © by Susan Michael and David Michael. Journaling Prompts Journaling Prompt - Imagine yourself in a place you like to be (not necessarily someplace you like to *go*). Journaling Prompt - Pretend that you see yourself walking into a room. Journaling Prompt - Create a list of images that symbolize the following: toughness, cruelty toughness, strength Journaling Prompt - Close your eyes for a minute and imagine you are skydiving. Journaling Prompt - Sit yourself in a favorite spot, or imagine an ideal place and describe it as an expanding bubble or sphere. Journaling Prompt - Hold your hands out in front of you, palms down. Journaling Prompt - By what do you measure your value as a person? Free Writing Prompts Poetry Prompts

creative writing National Poetry Month April is National Poetry Month, 30 days of celebrating the joy, expressiveness, and pure delight of poetry. Learn more about the National Poetry Month, get to know some of our most well-loved children's poets in our video interview series, browse the many online resources listed here, and visit your local library or bookstore to discover wonderful new books and anthologies. Poets on poetry Listen in as acclaimed children's writers like Marilyn Singer, Ashley Bryan, Jack Prelutsky, Mary Ann Hoberman, Nikki Grimes, and Janet Wong talk about reading poetry aloud and writing poetry. National Poetry Month resources National Poetry Month is a month-long, national celebration of poetry established by the Academy of American Poets. Bloggers in the kidlitosphere Kidlit bloggers are sharing poetry and poets in exciting new ways during National Poetry Month. 30 Poets/30 DaysThe GottaBook hosts the annual 30 Poets/30 Days project.

English 50 Exercises for Story Writers English 50 – Intro to Creative Writing: Exercises for Story Writers Basic Theory: What is a short story? As soon as someone delivers a definition, some good writer will write a story that proves the theory wrong. About the only thing we can say for sure is that short stories are short and that they are written in what we call prose. Some attributes, however, seem to show up more often than not. Short stories have a narrator; that is, someone tells the story; have at least one character in them; have some action occur (or perhaps fails to occur); take place somewhere; that is, there is a setting for the action; and someone either learns something or fails to learn something (theme).With these five characteristics in mind, we can create an almost endless supply of exercises to help sharpen our techniques of story telling. Narrative Voice Twenty or so years ago, voice was the "rite of passage" into a successful writing career. If you've written a story in third person, try it in first.

13 Lectures from Allen Ginsberg’s “History of Poetry” Course (1975) - If you want to understand poetry, ask a poet. “What is this?” you ask, “some kind of Zen saying?” Obvious, but subtle? Maybe. What I mean to say is that I have found poetry one of those distinctive practices of which the practitioners themselves—rather than scholars and critics—make the best expositors, even in such seemingly academic subject areas as the history of poetry. We’ve previously featured some of Ginsberg’s Naropa lectures here at Open Culture, including his 1980 short course on Shakespeare’s The Tempest and his lecture on “Expansive Poetics” from 1981. Ginsberg references Pound’s pithy text The ABC of Reading and discusses his penchant for “ransack[ing] the world’s literature, looking for usable verse forms.” Part 3: class on the history of poetry by Allen Ginsberg, in a series of classes in the Summer of 1975. Part 10: A class on the history of poetry by Allen Ginsberg, in a series of classes from 1975. Related Content:

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