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TimeRepublik, the ultimate Sharing Economy Experience: a global TimeBank where you share your talents, interests and passions in exchange for time

https://timerepublik.com/

Related:  technology / innovationMoneyless

Top 10 business ideas & opportunities for 2016 Just like the Nerdalize servers, the best innovations look to solve more than one problem at once. Tackling the dual problems of derelict housing lots and a lack of affordable housing in Amsterdam, Heijmans ONE are complete, self-contained two storey living units. They cost around EUR 700 per month to rent and come equipped with all the basic required facilities, including kitchen, bathroom, separate bedroom, living room and outside patio space. The units can be installed in derelict lots in less than a day, breathing life into neglected areas.

Time Banking with Onion River Exchange May 23, 2014 | Appropriate Technology, Community Projects | 21 Comments | Author: Kirsten Bradley Never has the saying ‘time is money’ been truer than when it comes to this community-based alternative currency idea. Members of a Time Bank exchange goods and services without money; using their own time instead as the currency, on the presumption that my time is just as valuable as your time…. An hour of sharing your gardening skills might get you an hour of someone’s time fixing your car. Providing a home-cooked meal might get you a yoga lesson. Meet Project Jacquard, Google's Plan To Turn Your Clothes Into A Touch Screen It’s one thing to say you want a culture of innovation. It’s another to actually get everyone truly innovating. We hear it all the time from the executive suite—take more risks, embrace uncertainty, learn from failure. The problem is that these mandates don’t necessarily move the needle. In fact, if they become seen as leadership lip service, they can actually lower morale and stifle the very innovation you want most. So what can you do?

Personal Sovereignty library Social Criticism Collection Most social criticism is an expression of reactive self-justification. A few individuals transcend their own limitations and write about what actually is so. Here you will find books by Vance Packard, Ralph Borsodi, Ferdinand Lundberg and many others.

5 Design Jobs That Won't Exist In The Future Organ designers, chief drone experience designers, cybernetic director. Those are some of the fanciful new roles that could be created by the global design industry in the next few years. But what about current design roles? How will they favor over the next 15 years? Will every company by 2030 have a chief design officer, or will they all go extinct? A year spent without shopping Michelle McGagh, a personal finance journalist from London, has nearly finished her year-long ban on shopping and has learned some interesting lessons along the way. It has been nearly one year since Michelle McGagh embarked on a buy nothing challenge. The 32-year-old personal finance journalist from London, England, realized that she was actually terrible with managing her own money.

» Capturing Motion with Photogrammetry and PhotoModeler Posted on Friday, October 11th, 2013 In this post I highlight the practical uses of PhotoModeler Motion (PMM), and feature two example projects. PhotoModeler Motion / PMM is the top of the PhotoModeler product line. It brings the time dimension into your measurement and modeling projects. PMM includes all features of PhotoModeler and PhotoModeler Scanner, and adds modeling of a dynamic object or scene over time – a PMM project encapsulates a series of mini projects – one per ‘epoch’, based on the frame rate of your photography or video.

Heidemarie Schwermer: A rich life without money Living without money was the way to live in the past. Money is only a recent phenomenon. But since we live in a money economy it's a big challenge to live without money. Empowering innovative companies to recruit and retain diverse talent Joelle Emerson Founder & CEO As the Founder and CEO of Paradigm, Joelle partners with leaders of some of the world's most exciting and innovative companies to develop and execute effective diversity strategies.

Mincome Mincome was an experimental Canadian basic income project that was held in Dauphin, Manitoba during the 1970s. The project, funded jointly by the Manitoba provincial government and the Canadian federal government, began with a news release on February 22, 1974, and was closed down in 1979. The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether a guaranteed, unconditional annual income caused disincentive to work for the recipients, and how great such a disincentive would be. It allowed every family unit to receive a minimum cash benefit. The results showed a modest impact on labor markets, with working hours dropping one percent for men, three percent for wives, and five percent for unmarried women.[1] However, some have argued these drops may be artificially low because participants knew the guaranteed income was temporary.[2] These decreases in hours worked may be seen as offset by the opportunity cost of more time for family and education.

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