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English conversation practice

English conversation practice
Related:  SpeakingLangues étrangères

PET Speaking: Home There are four parts in the PET speaking test: Part 1: general introductions;Part 2: discussion about a situation;Part 3: photographs; andPart 4: discussion about a topic. You can find up-to-date information about the PET exam at the Cambridge ESOL website. Part 1 In Part 1 the examiner will ask you questions. These could be about home, work, where you live, what you do, your family, etc. The examiner will ask you in turn. Part 2 In Part 2 you have to listen while the teacher explains a situation. You have to use words like “Why don’t we?” Back to top Part 3 In Part 3, you have to talk for one minute about a picture. Click on each picture to open it. Part 4 In Part 4, you have to talk with your partner about a topic. For example, if the two photos were about games, then you will have to talk together about games you play or like, or games you used to play. Back to top

Edulang - 1 an de cours d'anglais à partir d'un euro. 5Minute English Listening Lessons Dogs, Dogs, Dogs - Idioms and phrases using the word 'Dog'. Get the phone! - A listening exercise. ESL Lessons Daily Word Copyright 2009 - 2013 - 5MinuteEnglish.com is an ESL (English as a Second Language) Resource mrsabercrombie - English III Honors Navigation Skip to main content Create interactive lessons using any digital content including wikis with our free sister product TES Teach. Get it on the web or iPad! guest Join | Help | Sign In mrsabercrombie Home guest| Join | Help | Sign In Turn off "Getting Started" Loading... Listen A Minute: Easier English Listening and Activities

How to Come Up with Good Conversation Topics (with Sample Topics) Expert Reviewed Four Parts:Learning About Basic Conversation StartersExtending the ConversationPushing BoundariesConversation HelpCommunity Q&A Even if you're good with people, there are likely times when you're stuck for something more to say and start wondering what topic to bring up next. To come up with good conversation topics, you should prepare a mental list of ideas beforehand so that you can seamlessly pull up one idea and continue on with your chat. Form conversation around the other person, tailoring the topic based on how well you know him or her, and give the other person equal opportunity to steer the conversation in other directions. Steps Part 1 Learning About Basic Conversation Starters Part 2 Extending the Conversation Part 3 Pushing Boundaries Community Q&A Add New Question Is it normal to get nervous talking to a cute girl? Ask a Question If this question (or a similar one) is answered twice in this section, please click here to let us know. Please use 700 characters or less.

TV FREE LIVE TV MOVIES AND SOCIAL TELEVISION Everyday English in Conversation Does it happen to you that sometimes you feel frustrated because you find yourself unable to express yourself clearly and yet when you hear native speakers, you feel that it is so simple and easy? In this section, we will focus on learning idiomatic and everyday expressions to help us deal with daily conversational situations. Now, surf into Everyday English in Conversation!!! Note: The audio files are being updated in MP3. The following sections have been revamped: communication, eating, emotions, fashion, friendship, romance, health, housing, weather, and work. How to Start a Conversation When You Have Nothing to Talk About (with Examples) Edit Article Sample HintsStarting Your Conversation Edited by Anthony J. Colleluori, Jack Herrick, DrLynx, Ben Rubenstein and 164 others Starting a conversation to get to know someone or breaking an awkward silence can be very stressful. To start a conversation when you have nothing to talk about, use these guidelines. Ad Steps Starting Your Conversation 1Introduce yourself if necessary. 10Maintain the equilibrium. Tips Follow the lead that your listener is expressing. Warnings Make use of "please", "may I", "thank you", "could you" when someone is nice to you and when you want something.

Forvo : le guide de la prononciation. Tous les mots du monde prononcés par des locuteurs natifs English Club Welcome to EnglishClub Listening, to help you learn the skill of listening in English. Listening is the first of the four language skills, which are: 1. Listening 2. What Is Listening? How to Hear English Everywhere How can you hear English when you're not in an English-speaking country? Dictation Do you want to improve your English listening skills? Listen to English by Radio Listen to English online with programmes from stations like the BBC or Voice of America. Listen to the News Listen to our weekly digest of the news in English. Listen to Poetry in English Some classic pieces of poetry and other texts for you to listen to and read. Podcasts You can listen online or download these readings, many of which come with transcript and wordchecker to explain vocabulary. Improve your listening with MyEC! MyEnglishClub features thousands of videos and songs for English learners. This Week in History Listen to a new story every Monday. The Learning English Video Project Lots of listening practice.

Language In Use It is great to show and offer students many examples of English language in use. Meaning, students appreciate that there are many ways to say the same thing and like to see the "nuance" of the English language. Here are some images showing different ways / expressions to communicate a similar thing. Might be handy. bab.la Phrases The phrase dictionary includes thousands of common phrases divided into six main categories: Academic Writing, Business Communication, Applications and Résumés, Personal Correspondence, Travel, and Immigration. Within each category widely used phrases are grouped together according to the situation in which a phrase is used. The situation description helps you judge in which context to use the phrase. The idea behind the phrases dictionary is to use it as a tool to help with formal writing or where it is expected to use a particular writing style. Rules for formal writing are quite strict, though often unstated and very difficult to learn as a non-native speaker. The most telling example is writing an academic paper or thesis, but also business proposals or letters are expected to have a certain style.

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